background preloader

The Self Sufficient Blog

The Self Sufficient Blog
The Self Sufficient Blog is my mini-journal about self sufficent farm living. It... -- keeps you up-to-date on new information and what others are doing to become more self sufficient. ---New methods and creative approaches to farm living. -- keeps you up-to-date with other postings or news about self sufficient farm living --Join my blog and become more self sufficent by clicking on the orange button to subscribe. Self Sufficient Living There is nothing like the feeling of self sufficient living. Continue reading "Self Sufficient Living" The "Ah ha" Moment Here I am, 54 years old. Continue reading "The "Ah ha" Moment" Aquaponics Systems Aquaponics systems, simply put, is an agriculture ecosystem where plants and animals co-habitat in a cultivated water environment. Continue reading "Aquaponics Systems" Homemade Solar Panels People are successfully making homemade solar panels that perform and look better than manufactured panels. Continue reading "Homemade Solar Panels" Farms R Us

Country Farm Lifestyles Blog Practical self sufficiency through food skills. Surviving The Middle Class Crash The urban guide to being self sufficient'ish This is an easy recipe to follow and creates a delightful, if not usual tasting beer. It is very cheap to make and follows a traditionally english recipe. Before hops were widely used in the 17th century all sorts of plant were used to flavor the ale including nettles.(Urtica dioica). It was also thought to help alleviate rheumatic pain, gout and asthma. Nettle beer has become more popular in recent years (we would like to think we helped influence that!). Ingredients 900grams (2lb) young nettle tops 3.8lts (1 gallon) of water 230 grams (8oz) of sugar, brown or demarrara sugar works best. 7.5 grams (0.25oz) of fresh yeast small piece of toast 7.5 grams (0.25oz) of ground ginger Method Boil the nettle tops in the water for half an hour (you will need a very large pan for this or preferably a cauldron). Keeping the mixture, strain and add sugar, stirring to dissolve. Spread the yeast onto the toast and float on the surface of the nettle liquid. False Economy Small Space and small budget Leaves

Sustainable Food Center - Austin, Texas A Man Replaces His Lawn With a Giant Vegetable Garden and No Regrets During the summer, nothing is better than the smell of freshly cut grass. That is, unless, you have a giant vegetable garden growing in the place of your lawn. Instead of turf, this awesome homeowner, user locolukas on Reddit, opted for tomatoes. The results are absolutely epic. What you see actually used to be a lawn. But instead of mowing grass, one man decided to say “screw the lawn” and plant vegetables. He filled his yard’s grid with compost that the city gave away. Seeds began growing quickly and he had to keep up by planting support systems around them. He even developed an irrigation system, which is much more difficult than it looks. He lined his garden with cinder blocks, covered the ground with wood chips and filled the cinder blocks with compost as well. Arugula came in first. Then spinach. Then beets. Radishes began growing quickly. He grew carrots by the bucketful. Peas aplenty! The man even began giving out the veggies he couldn’t possibly eat, helping to spread the wealth. Peppers.

High Altitude Living In WA & CO Resources - The Happy Homesteader Blog Bruce and Carol McElmurray live in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains of Colorado at an elevation of 9,750'. Ed and Laurie Essex live off grid in the Okanogan Highlands of Washington State at an elevation of 4200’. Bruce and Ed, bloggers for The Happy Homesteader at Mother Earth News, have decided to collaborate on a blog about their high-altitude living. What natural resources do you have on your property and how do you utilize them? Ed Essex: We use the sun for solar power. Our whole electrical system is powered by the sun including a 220V deep well pump. We also use the sun for passive heat in our home in the winter and to keep our insulated cold frames warm enough to grow fresh veggies in the winter without any other source of heat. We use the existing groundwater for our drinking water. We use the rainwater to fill our cisterns. We use the two cisterns at the house to water the garden and the one at the barn to water our two horses. We use our timber to heat our home and cook with.

Provident Living Today Will Always Reward You Lehman's Country Life

Related: