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Why 20% Time is Good for Schools

Why 20% Time is Good for Schools
Have you ever met an adult who doesn't really love what they do, but just goes through the motions in their job and everyday life? Have you spoken with men and women who constantly complain, showing no visible passion for anything in the world? I'm sure that, like me, you have met those people. I've also seen the making of these adults in schools across our country: students who are consistently being "prepared" for the next test, assessment, or grade level . . . only to find out after graduation that they don't really know what they are passionate about. These are the same students who are never allowed to learn what they want in school. Forced down a curriculum path that we believe is "best for them," they discover it is a path that offers very little choice in subject matter and learning outcomes. Enter 20% time. What 20% time allows students to do is pick their own project and learning outcomes, while still hitting all the standards and skills for their grade level. Students Teachers

https://www.edutopia.org/blog/20-percent-time-a-j-juliani

Related:  problem based learninggood ideasProject based/ inquiry learningcreativityPBL 2

How to Trigger Students’ Inquiry Through Projects Inquiry Learning Teaching Strategies Krauss/Boss By Jane Krauss and Suzie Boss Excerpt from Thinking Through Project-Based Learning: Guiding Deeper Inquiry, published by Corwin, 2013. When students engage in quality projects, they develop knowledge, skills, and dispositions that serve them in the moment and in the long term. Building Parent Support for Project-Based Learning When a teacher, school or district tells parents, "We're going to do project-based learning," the response may vary. You're lucky if some say, "Great news! Students need to be taught differently these days!" But a more typical response might be: The six cornerstones of creativity Ever wondered what creativity is? Well, according to men much smarter than me (and contrary to popular opinion), it’s something we’re all born with. Something which, over time, we can all learn to develop. Sorry to shatter all your illusions, but you weren’t bestowed with a special ‘gift’. In fact, a study by George Land reveals we’re all naturally creative. It’s something inherent in all of us.

Personalized PBL: Student-Designed Learning I wrote a blog about one of the pitfalls of personalization for the ASCD Whole Child Blog. Specifically, that pitfall is the lack of engagement. With all the focus on personalization through time, pacing, and place, it can be easy to forget about the importance of engagement. No matter where students learn, when they learn, and the timing of the learning, engagement drives them to learn. When we factor all the pieces of personalization together, we can truly meet students where they are and set them on a path of learning that truly meets their needs and desires. Project-based learning can be an effective engagement framework to engage students in personalized learning.

Habits of Mind Over the past few weeks I've been thinking about the Habits of Mind as described by Art Costa and Bena Kallick. These habits of mind are the dispositions that a student has towards behaving intelligently when confronted with problems. My question has been, do the PYP Attitudes and the IB Learner Profile also promote these habits of mind?

4 Phases of Inquiry-Based Learning: A Guide For Teachers According to Indiana University Bloomington, Inquiry-based learning is an “instructional model that centers learning on a solving a particular problem or answering a central question. There are several different inquiry-based learning models, but most have several general elements in common: Learning focuses around a meaningful, ill-structured problem that demands consideration of diverse perspectivesAcademic content-learning occurs as a natural part of the process as students work towards finding solutionsLearners, working collaboratively, assume an active role in the learning processTeachers provide learners with learning supports and rich multiple media sources of information to assist students in successfully finding solutionsLearners share and defend solutions publicly in some manner” The process itself can be broken down into stages, or phases, that help teachers frame instruction. 4 Phases of Inquiry-Based Learning: A Guide For Teachers 1.

Cultivating Creative-Mindedness Professor Guy Claxton will be speaking at the 2014 WISE Summit When people talk about education, they often focus on two dimensions. One is: What shall we teach children? Turn Your Classroom into a Workshop to Engage Learners If you think a classroom bereft of traditional tools like homework, bell work, worksheets and even grades sounds intriguing, you are ready to convert your classroom into a workshop setting, where learning will really soar. Say Goodbye to Order Order means control. There is no room for control in a dynamic workshop setting. When I created my first Results Only Learning Environment, desks were gathered in small groups.

The 8 Elements Project-Based Learning Must Have If you’re contemplating using Project-Based Learning or are already trying out the latest craze to hit the modern classroom, you should know about this checklist. It details if you’re actually doing it correctly. For example, does your project focus on significant content, develop 21st century skills, and engage students in in-depth inquirty (just to name a few)? If not, you might want to reconsider your PBL approach. See Also: What Is Project-Based Learning? The checklist is by the PBL masters over at BIE and they’ve outlined 8 different ‘essential elements’ that must be present in a project in order for it to be considered PBL.

Education Week Last week's question was: What are the Do's & Don'ts of Project-Based Learning? Few people know more about Project-Based Learning than Suzie Boss, and she graciously agreed to respond to this "question of the week." In addition, several readers left thoughtful comments. Between them, I don't really have much to add. However, I have collected useful resources on multiple cooperative learning activities, including on Project-Based Learning.

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