background preloader

Sewing School

Sewing School
Welcome to the Sewing School! I get a lot of emails and comments asking about how to do certain sewing related things and where to find old posts on my blog and so in an effort to consolidate the tutorials and sewing advice you find here on A Fashionable Stitch, I’ve made up this handy dandy Table of Contents page to navigate you through what’s available here. It’s due to be added to every now and then, so check back when you are searching for something and can’t find it. Happy Sewing Adventures! xoxo, Sunni Making a muslin or a test garment (also known as a toile) is a great way to find out if certain alterations are needed for a particular pattern. Alterations for Pants/Trousers Getting a pair of pants or trousers to fit perfectly can be one of the hardest fittings we ever do as sewists. Flat Pattern Adjustments Flat Pattern Adjustments are adjustments made to the pattern before you make a muslin. Ready to add a few techniques to your to your sewing box? Need a little inspiration?

http://www.afashionablestitch.com/sewing-school/

Related:  sewingSewingBlogs of Tutorials

Leena's.com: PatternMaker Tutorial Web Site Copyright ©1998-2000 Leena Lähteenmäki, Järvenpää Use PatternMaker ladies' coat/robe macro to draft patterns to this coat. To download and buy macros, please go to the PatternMaker Website. In the macro there are options for two kinds of hoods, normal and integrated. Circle skirt calculator – for the drafting of full, half and 3/4 skirts. With bonus grading worksheet! Special Sunday greetings you naked molerats! Since you’re so naked, I thought you might want to make yourselves some nice little circle skirts. And perhaps, like me, you find yourself with little mole rat patterns just a touch on the small side. But the grading of a circle skirt isn’t so easy, is it you naked rodents? Oh no, not so easy at all…

Sewing Tips Directory I have been wanting to make this sewing tips directory forever. A list of all the best sewing tips, tricks, and techniques from around the web all in one spot. I had some pinned, some bookmarked, others referenced on my other posts, and some just in my head. Finally, one tidy list – kind of like a yellow pages for the best sewing tips. Adding Lining to an Unlined Blazer You may know that I am planning a polka dot blazer this summer and in deciding what sort of blazer I wanted to make I went to three places… My closet to see what types of blazers I have that I wear a lot, the internet to see what sort of blazers are out there in the regular world, and I also checked out a lot of sewing patterns. One thing I noticed, on BurdaStyle in particular, is that there are a lot of patterns for unlined blazers and jackets. While I’m all about the Hong Kong binding and all that junk (especially with pretty contrasting colors, etc.), I really sort of just like to bag it all up nice with a lining and call it a day. I’m guessing I’m not the only one so I thought I would share this little tutorial on how to create a lining for your blazer.

Bag Your Jacket Lining Lining a jacket makes it last longer and become easier to slip on and off. Best yet, using the bagging method is as quick or quicker than finishing an unlined jacket. Photo: Sloan Howard. by Sandra Millettfrom Threads #88, pp. 56-59 Sewing jackets is something I like to do, but lining them is another matter. Sleeves, Necklines, Collars, and Dress Types I’ve recently ventured into drafting patterns starting from my basic bodice and skirt sloper. The fit issues are minimal, since the sloper is made skin tight. Design ease is added as you go along. I found these reference pictures useful for ideas on basic sleeves, necklines, collars, and dress types.

tips and techniques « The Selfish Seamstress Oh my goodness, selfish readers, I cannot believe the outpouring of warm wishes in the comments on my last post. Thank you so very, very much for your many kind notes. Reading them almost makes Selfish wish that she had even a tiny little heart instead of a hard lump of rock in her chest, because if she did, she would surely have been very moved by all of your touching sentiments and congratulatory wishes. And so, as a gesture of something akin to gratitude, here’s a little present to you- a DIY project so quick, simple, and trendy, you’ll either say, “Now why didn’t I think of that” or “Duh, I already thought of that. You always think you’re so smart, Selfish Seamstress, but you’re really NOT.” (Also, there were some questions in the comments on my last post, so I’ll address them at the end of this post- stay tuned.)

Zippered inner bag pocket **UPDATE** If you'd like this tutorial (or any of my others) in PDF format click here. Note: to view the PDF tutorial, you will need the latest Adobe Viewer program. Get the latest version of the viewer absolutely free by clicking on the button below: Here is a tutrorial for zippered pockets inside bags. They look smart, they prevent your valuables from going 'walkies', they make essentials such as lippy and your mirror easy to get at, and a girl can never have too many pockets in her bag! This one is for you Katie :)

How To Turn Your Dress Ideas Into Reality By Making A Custom Pattern Jenna! You continue to astound and amaze us with your just do it your own damn self awesomeness! As stated below - this is really pattern draping, but the BEST source I've found for actual flat pattern drafting using slopers (the basic building blocks of every garment pattern piece) is "The Theory of Fashion Design", by Helen Brockman. It's from 1965, and is a super fantastic source of the hows and whys of how the elements of a design work together, and then how that all translates into your drafted pattern pieces. The sample designs are at once classic, kitsch, and insanely informative.

15 tips from industrial sewing Today, we have a very special guest post from local sewing legend, Sharon Blair. Sharon runs Portland Sewing, where she and her faculty teach a wide range of classes including industrial techniques. I had the pleasure of meeting Sharon recently and asked her to fill us in on some tips home sewers can take away from industry practices. -Sarai image: industrial sewing machine by kerem79 picnic dress Several people have asked me how to make my Picnic Dress. It’s a bit too complicated for the step by step instruction on how to draft a pattern I gave for the draped t-shirt, but I hope this will be enough detail for anyone who is familiar with how dresses are made. You will need 4 yards of 45″ fabric and an 18″ zipper. These are the pieces of the pattern.

Related: