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Days Of Noah

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A Nazarene Looks at the Book of Mormon Part 1 - Nazarene Space By James Scott Trimm The Book of Mormon makes a major mistake from a Nazarene standpoint. The Book of Mormon does not represent the teachings of the Bible, but instead presents the teachings Protestant Christians have BELIEVED are in the Bible. Although the Book of Mormon, unlike the Bible, presents a continuous story line running from "Old Testament Times" through into "New Testament Times"; the Book of Mormon is still clearly dividable into "Old Testament" and "New Testament" portions. Now in its "Old Testament Portion" the Book of Mormon teaches exactly what Christians WISH they could find in the "Old Testament" portion of the Bible. The "Old Testament portion" of the Book of Mormon teaches that the Torah was only temporary and should only be observed until the coming of Messiah: ...that our children may know the deadness of the law; and they by knowing the deadness of the law, may look forward unto that life which is in Christ, and know for what end the law was given. James Trimm

YHWH is El PodOmatic | Podcast - Passion for Truth Ministries YHWHYahuahTransliteration study on the Name of the MessiahSabbathMessianicNatsarimIsraelYahushuaLewWhiteFossilizedCustomsTorahNazareneIsraelPaganChristianityKipa The Transliteration of the Name What Is the Hebrew Name for JESUS? It is definitely not "JESUS". For those who want to get to the answer, we'll be skipping the Greek and Latin to find out. A Very Hairy Situation Going backward through languages, "JESUS" becomes "ESAU" in Hebrew! Try to follow the logic here; we're going to use the same logical flow, only in reverse: Whenever we see discussions on the difference between "Yahusha" and "Jesus", it's important to realize it is somewhat like comparing apples with oranges. One is Hebrew, the other Greek. Many miss that the question is referring to "it", a singular identity for what people mistake to be 2 beings. Our Husband's Name is not Greek, it's Hebrew Also, the one incidence at NekemYah 8:17 is acceptable as an abbreviated form. In 216 of these, the spelling is: yod-hay-uau-shin-ayin: YAHUSHA #1954: HAY-UAU-SHIN-AYIN (HUSHA), rendered in the KJV as “HOSHEA” (Dt. 32:44), and “OSHEA” (Num 13:16). YOD-HAY-UAU-SHIN-UAU-AYIN, or “YAHUSHUA”.

YAH'S WATCHMAN Adam Was Black Antiquities of the Jews by Flavius Josephus This work was translated by William Whiston and edited by the folks at Sage Software, who offer these works, as well as hundreds of ancient and modern authors, on CD from (I am not associated with Sage Software, but left the plug for their CD in place because it is from their production of the text that my work here is based.) HTML conversion was performed from RTF and Microsoft Word sources locally. Preface Book I Containing The Interval Of Three Thousand Eight Hundred And Thirty-Three Years. Chapter 1 The Constitution Of The World And The Disposition Of The Elements. Chapter 2 Concerning The Posterity Of Adam, And The Ten Generations From Him To The Deluge Chapter 3 Concerning The Flood; And After What Manner Noah Was Saved In An Ark, With His Kindred, And Afterwards Dwelt In The Plain Of Shinar Chapter 4 Concerning The Tower Of Babylon, And The Confusion Of Tongues Chapter 5 Chapter 6 How Every Nation Was Denominated From Their First Inhabitants

1bread.org Ancient Near Eastern Texts Relating to the Old Testament Ancient Near Eastern Texts Relating to the Old Testament edited by James B. Pritchard (1st ed. 1950, 2nd ed.1955, 3rd ed. 1969[1]) is an anthology of important historical, legal, mythological, liturgical, and secular texts from the ancient Near East. William W. Hallo, writing in the Journal of the American Oriental Society in 1970, described it as "a modern classic ever since its first appearance in 1950", because "for the first time it assembled some of the most significant Ancient Near Eastern texts in authoritative, generously annotated English translations based on the accumulated insight of several generations of scholarship scattered".[2] It is conventional to cite the work as ANET.[3] ANEP refers to a companion volume Ancient Near Eastern Pictures Relating to the Old Testament (1969), featuring 882 black and white designs and photos.[4] Publication[edit] The book was published by Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey, in 1950. Contents[edit] I. II. III. Also:

J - Jewish Education & Entertainment (Learn Hebrew, Jewish Games) Torah of Messiah combats the trinity and anti-law teachings whil MAKERS & SUPPORTERS OF GMO Hebrew Alphabet The Hebrew and Yiddish languages use a different alphabet than English. The picture below illustrates the Hebrew alphabet, in Hebrew alphabetical order. Note that Hebrew is written from right to left, rather than left to right as in English, so Alef is the first letter of the Hebrew alphabet and Tav is the last. The Hebrew alphabet is often called the "alefbet," because of its first two letters. Letters of the Alefbet Table 1: The Hebrew Alphabet If this sounds like Greek to you, you're not far off! The "Kh" and the "Ch" are pronounced as in German or Scottish, a throat clearing noise, not as the "ch" in "chair." Note that there are two versions of some letters. Vowels and Points Like most early Semitic alphabetic writing systems, the alefbet has no vowels. However, as Hebrew literacy declined, particularly after the Romans expelled the Jews from Israel, the rabbis recognized the need for aids to pronunciation, so they developed a system of dots and dashes called nikkud (points).

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