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Hacker ethic

Hacker ethic
While some tenets of hacker ethic were described in other texts like Computer Lib/Dream Machines (1974) by Ted Nelson, Levy appears to have been the first to document both the philosophy and the founders of the philosophy. Levy explains that MIT housed an early IBM 704 computer inside the Electronic Accounting Machinery (EAM) room in 1959. This room became the staging grounds for early hackers, as MIT students from the Tech Model Railroad Club sneaked inside the EAM room after hours to attempt programming the 30-ton, 9-foot-tall (2.7 m) computer. The hacker ethic was described as a "new way of life, with a philosophy, an ethic and a dream". However, the elements of the hacker ethic were not openly debated and discussed; rather they were implicitly accepted and silently agreed upon.[2] The free software movement was born in the early 1980s from followers of the hacker ethic. Richard Stallman describes: The hacker ethics[edit] All information should be free Sharing[edit] See also[edit] [edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hacker_ethic

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On Exactitude in Science "On Exactitude in Science" or "On Rigor in Science" (the original Spanish-language title is "Del rigor en la ciencia") is a one-paragraph short story by Jorge Luis Borges, about the map/territory relation, written in the form of a literary forgery. Plot[edit] . . . In that Empire, the Art of Cartography attained such Perfection that the map of a single Province occupied the entirety of a City, and the map of the Empire, the entirety of a Province.

80+ Best Free Hacking Tutorials Learning to become hacker is not as easy as learning to become a software developer. I realized this when I started looking for learning resources for simple hacking people do. Even to start doing the simplest hack on own, a hacker requires to have in depth knowledge of multiple topics. Some people recommend minimum knowledge of few programming languages like C, Python, HTML with Unix operating system concepts and networking knowledge is required to start learning hacking techniques.

How To Become A Hacker Copyright © 2001 Eric S. Raymond As editor of the Jargon File and author of a few other well-known documents of similar nature, I often get email requests from enthusiastic network newbies asking (in effect) "how can I learn to be a wizardly hacker?". Simulacra and Simulation Simulacra and Simulation (French: Simulacres et Simulation) is a 1981 philosophical treatise by Jean Baudrillard seeking to interrogate the relationships among reality, symbols, and society. Simulacra are copies that depict things that either had no reality to begin with, or that no longer have an original.[1] Simulation is the imitation of the operation of a real-world process or system over time.[2] ...The simulacrum is never that which conceals the truth—it is the truth which conceals that there is none. The simulacrum is true.[3] "Simulacra and Simulation" breaks the sign-order into 4 stages:

Hacker (programmer subculture) A team of hackers competing in the CTF competition at DEF CON 17 A hacker is an adherent of the subculture that originally emerged in academia in the 1960s, around the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)'s Tech Model Railroad Club (TMRC)[1] and MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory.[2] A hacker is someone who loves to program or who enjoys playful cleverness, or a combination of the two.[3] The act of engaging in activities (such as programming or other media[4]) in a spirit of playfulness and exploration is termed hacking.

Defensible network architecture For the nearly 20 years since Zwicky, Cooper and Chapman first wrote about Firewalls the firewall has been the primary defense mechanism of nearly every entity attached to the Internet. While perimeter protection is still important in the modern enterprise, the fact is that the nature of Internet business has vastly changed and the crunchy perimeter and squishy inside approach has long since become outdated. You can’t deny what you must permit and the primary attack vectors today appear to be email and browser exploits; two aspects of your business model that you cannot do without and which can give the bad guys a foothold inside your perimeter protections. As the Sony, Target, Home Depot, and many other breaches have shown, once the bad guys are into the network they are content to dig in, explore, and exfiltrate large amounts of data and will often go undetected for months.

» Dimensionality: The Manifestation of Fate Official Paul Laffoley Website © Paul Laffoley 1999 The rationalized dimensionality above and below the Euclidean third dimension (or the so-called “consensus” reality) was the work of the geometer and astronomer Carl Fredrich Gauss (1777-1855), who conceived of a higher-dimensional analytic geometry, and the mathematician-physicist Georg Friedrich Bernhard Riemann (1826-1866), who as a student was influenced by Gauss. Riemann advanced the thought by developing an N-dimensional manifold with a metric (a rule for assigning lengths to paths), which meant you could now consider force or energy as a consequence of geometry, thus making the laws of nature seem simpler when viewed from the context of higher dimensional space. From the mid-nineteenth century until now, dimensionality has gradually replaced the traditional concept of fate, first anthropomorphized by the ancient Greeks as three female sovereigns who determine the course of human life. 1) Clotho- the spinner – she who spins the thread of life

The Real Science Behind Cracking Passwords b46f685f85e0af830d82ddbbe795eff3 By adding a unique salt, I can do something about that. I created a quick Javascript program that takes the user’s name, and pulls the first and last three letters from their username and makes them into a salt. Then, the program takes the salt, plus the user’s password, and runs them through the MD5 algorithm and produces the hash that will be their password. Take a look at the results below. Username | Password | HASH Top 10 Password Crackers SecTools.Org: Top 125 Network Security Tools For more than a decade, the Nmap Project has been cataloguing the network security community's favorite tools. In 2011 this site became much more dynamic, offering ratings, reviews, searching, sorting, and a new tool suggestion form .

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