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Hacker (programmer subculture)

Hacker (programmer subculture)
A team of hackers competing in the CTF competition at DEF CON 17 A hacker is an adherent of the subculture that originally emerged in academia in the 1960s, around the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)'s Tech Model Railroad Club (TMRC)[1] and MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory.[2] A hacker is someone who loves to program or who enjoys playful cleverness, or a combination of the two.[3] The act of engaging in activities (such as programming or other media[4]) in a spirit of playfulness and exploration is termed hacking. Richard Stallman explains about hackers who program: What they had in common was mainly love of excellence and programming. They wanted to make their programs that they used be as good as they could. Before communications between computers and computer users were as networked as they are now, there were multiple independent and parallel hacker subcultures, often unaware or only partially aware of each other's existence. Related:  Hackingsecurity and hackingsecurity

.:: Phrack Magazine ::. How To Become A Hacker Copyright © 2001 Eric S. Raymond As editor of the Jargon File and author of a few other well-known documents of similar nature, I often get email requests from enthusiastic network newbies asking (in effect) "how can I learn to be a wizardly hacker?". Back in 1996 I noticed that there didn't seem to be any other FAQs or web documents that addressed this vital question, so I started this one. A lot of hackers now consider it definitive, and I suppose that means it is. Still, I don't claim to be the exclusive authority on this topic; if you don't like what you read here, write your own. If you are reading a snapshot of this document offline, the current version lives at Note: there is a list of Frequently Asked Questions at the end of this document. The five-dots-in-nine-squares diagram that decorates this document is called a glider. If you find this document valuable, please leave me a tip on Gittip. If you want to be a hacker, keep reading.

80+ Best Free Hacking Tutorials | Resources to Become Pro Hacker Learning to become hacker is not as easy as learning to become a software developer. I realized this when I started looking for learning resources for simple hacking people do. Even to start doing the simplest hack on own, a hacker requires to have in depth knowledge of multiple topics. Though knowing a lot of things is required, it is not really enough for you to be a competent and successful hacker. If you are thinking about ethical hacking as a career option, you may need to be prepared for a lot of hard/smart work. A lot of people (including me before doing research for this article) think that they can become a hacker using some free hacking tools available on web. Hacking is not only about knowing "how things work", but its about knowing "why things work that way" and "how can we challenge it". Below are some really useful hacking tutorials and resources you may want to explore in your journey of learning to hack Hacking For Dummies - Beginners Tutorials EBooks And Whitepapers

Hacks at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology A hack in progress in Lobby 7. Although the practice is unsanctioned by the university, and students have sometimes been arraigned on trespassing charges for hacking,[18][19][20] hacks have substantial significance to MIT's history and student culture. Student bloggers working for the MIT Admissions Office have often written about MIT hacks, including those occurring during Campus Preview Weekend (CPW), an event welcoming admitted prospective freshman students.[21] Alumni bloggers on the MIT Alumni Association website also report and document some of the more memorable hacks.[22] Since the mid-1970s, the student-written guide How To Get Around MIT (HowToGAMIT) has included a chapter on hacking, and discusses history, hacker groups, ethics, safety tips, and risks of the activity.[23] Cultural aspects[edit] Residents of MIT's Simmons Hall collaborated to make a smiley face on the building's facade, December 8, 2002. Famous hacks[edit]

HackerspaceWiki Hacker ethic While some tenets of hacker ethic were described in other texts like Computer Lib/Dream Machines (1974) by Ted Nelson, Levy appears to have been the first to document both the philosophy and the founders of the philosophy. Levy explains that MIT housed an early IBM 704 computer inside the Electronic Accounting Machinery (EAM) room in 1959. This room became the staging grounds for early hackers, as MIT students from the Tech Model Railroad Club sneaked inside the EAM room after hours to attempt programming the 30-ton, 9-foot-tall (2.7 m) computer. The hacker ethic was described as a "new way of life, with a philosophy, an ethic and a dream". However, the elements of the hacker ethic were not openly debated and discussed; rather they were implicitly accepted and silently agreed upon.[2] The free software movement was born in the early 1980s from followers of the hacker ethic. Richard Stallman describes: The hacker ethics[edit] All information should be free Sharing[edit] See also[edit] [edit]

HackQuest :: Learn about Hacking, Cracking, JavaScript, PHP, Cryptology and Password security Cybrary - Free Online Cyber Security Training, Forever | Learn and Find Jobs Top 100 Network Security Tools Serial Key Code The Real Science Behind Cracking Passwords b46f685f85e0af830d82ddbbe795eff3 By adding a unique salt, I can do something about that. I created a quick Javascript program that takes the user’s name, and pulls the first and last three letters from their username and makes them into a salt. Then, the program takes the salt, plus the user’s password, and runs them through the MD5 algorithm and produces the hash that will be their password. Take a look at the results below. UserNumeroUno | P@SSW0RD | 52743b4d6f93a6827d887f428ea84f43 UserNumberOne | P@SSW0RD | c9230eef666f58dedddeeaa18b395606Just to clarify. UserNumeroUno’s salt would be “Uuno” and UserNumberOne’s salt would be “Uone” var HASH = md5(salt + password); Try it out for yourself with different passwords and you can see how interesting effects can be done with salts to secure passwords further. No matter how good a hashing algorithm is, it merely protects the password from getting stolen and used immediately. The Math! Complexity Length I’m going to give you two passwords: WOW!

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