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Consciousness: Mind Over Matter

Invisible Worlds Richard Hammond's Invisible Worlds is a BBC television documentary programme presented by Richard Hammond that features state-of-the-art camera technology used to focus on what humans cannot see with the naked eye. It is one series long consisting of three episodes. 1. Speed Limits - Richard Hammond explores the extraordinary wonders of the world of detail hidden in the blink of an eye. The human eye takes about fifty milliseconds to blink. What new marvels would we see? 2. From death-defying aerial repairmen in the United States using ultraviolet cameras to seek out an invisible force that lurks unseen on power lines, to German scientists unlocking the secrets of animal locomotion with the world's most powerful moving x-ray camera, to infrared cameras that can finally reveal the secrets within a humble beehive, he shows how new technologies are letting us see our world anew. 3. Watch the full documentary now (playlist - 2 hours, 56 minutes)

Consciousness Representation of consciousness from the seventeenth century At one time consciousness was viewed with skepticism by many scientists, but in recent years it has become a significant topic of research in psychology, neuropsychology and neuroscience. The primary focus is on understanding what it means biologically and psychologically for information to be present in consciousness—that is, on determining the neural and psychological correlates of consciousness. The majority of experimental studies assess consciousness by asking human subjects for a verbal report of their experiences (e.g., "tell me if you notice anything when I do this"). Issues of interest include phenomena such as subliminal perception, blindsight, denial of impairment, and altered states of consciousness produced by drugs and alcohol, or spiritual or meditative techniques. Etymology and early history[edit] John Locke, British philosopher active in the 17th century In the dictionary[edit] Philosophy of mind[edit]

Google: Behind the Screen What if all the information in the world was categorized and easily searchable? What if all the news from around the world, all books, written texts, photos and videos that exist on a place in the world would be collected, and would be available everywhere? That is precisely the goal of Google and it will not be long for it to be realized. Through the well-known search engine, Google Earth, where all information is classified by geographical location, along with Google Books, a project where Google digitizes complete libraries. Tegenlicht visits the head office of Google in Mountain View, California and spoke with Vint Cerf, who commissioned by the American army is the forerunner of the developed Internet. Cert now works at Google, where he helps to create and develop new possibilities for the Internet. Google grows like a cabbage and they continue to hire more and more smart people in order to achieve their company goal faster. Watch the full documentary now

The Search for Life: The Drake Equation For many years our place in the universe was the subject of theologians and philosophers, not scientists, but in 1960 one man changed all that. Dr Frank Drake was one of the leading lights in the new science of radio astronomy when he did something that was not only revolutionary, but could have cost him his career. Working at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Greenback in Virginia, he pointed one of their new 25-meter radio telescopes at a star called Tau Ceti twelve light years from earth, hoping for signs of extra-terrestrial intelligence. Although project Ozma resulted in silence, it did result in one of the most seminal equations in the history of science - the Drake Equation - which examined seven key elements necessary for ET intelligence to exist, from the formation of stars to the likely length a given intelligent civilization may survive. However, in the 50 years of listening that has followed, not one single bleep has been heard from ET.

Life After People The very notion is deliciously ghoulish: What happens to earth if - or when - people suddenly vanished? The History Channel presents a dramatic, fascinating what-if scenario, part science fiction and part true natural science. Welcome to Earth, Population: 0 is the catchy tagline, Life After People's 94 minutes are so gripping you nearly forget while you watch that you, yourself, will be gone too. It turns out that earth can go along very nicely without us. The impact of the lack of people will be noticed right away, as most power grids shut down around the planet. Elsewhere, critters and plants will have their run of Manhattan and every other previously "civilized" spot. Watch the full documentary now - Season 1 (playlist - 14 hours)

Equinox Parental Control My4oD: As viewing video on 4oD requires javascript, related functions such as viewing history, playlist and favourites cannot be used with javascript disabled First Broadcast: 12AM Sun 27 September 2009 Channel 4 This programme - first broadcast in 1999 - takes a look behind the scenes of air traffic control in New York, the world's busiest airspace. Currently displaying all only audio described episodes + Display all episodes + Display only audio described episodes There is already a Channel 4 account registered to {| current_emailAddress |} {| merge_radio |} Sign in with your Channel 4 account {* #tradAuthenticateMergeForm *} {* signIn_emailAddress *} {* mergeSignIn_password *} {* signIn_signInButton *} {* /tradAuthenticateMergeForm *} To sign in wiith your Facebook account you need to register with 4 {* newsletterOptIn *} {* stayLoggedIn *} Check this box to be remembered on this computer.

Alan and Marcus Go Forth and Multiply Ever since he was at school, actor and comedian Alan Davies has hated maths. And like many people, he is not much good at it either. But Alan has always had a sneaking suspicion that he was missing out. So, with the help of top mathematician Professor Marcus du Sautoy (The Story of Maths and How Long Is A Piece Of String?) Alan is going to embark on a maths odyssey. Together they visit the fourth dimension, cross the universe and explore the concept of infinity. But did his abilities peak 25 years ago when he got his grade C O-Level? This documentary is available for preview only.

An Experiment to Save The World In March 2002, the scientific world was rocked by some astonishing news: a distinguished US government scientist claimed he had made nuclear fusion out of sound waves in his laboratory. Rusi Taleyarkhan's breakthrough was such important news because nuclear fusion is one of the most difficult scientific processes, and also one of the most coveted. It could solve all of our energy problems for ever. In principle, sufficient fuel exists on earth to provide clean, pollution-free energy for billions of people for millions of years. To make it happen, individual atoms must be slammed into each other with enough energy to make them fuse together, something that requires temperatures found only in the core of stars like our Sun – over 10 million Kelvin. The idea that these temperatures had been reached in a small scale laboratory using only soundwaves took many scientists by surprise. Taleyarkhan's fusion breakthrough was based on a little-understood process called sonoluminescence.

Science and Islam Physicist Jim Al-Khalili travels through Syria, Iran, Tunisia and Spain to tell the story of the great leap in scientific knowledge that took place in the Islamic world between the 8th and 14th centuries. Its legacy is tangible, with terms like algebra, algorithm and alkali all being Arabic in origin and at the very heart of modern science – there would be no modern mathematics or physics without algebra, no computers without algorithms and no chemistry without alkalis. For Baghdad-born Al-Khalili this is also a personal journey and on his travels he uncovers a diverse and outward-looking culture, fascinated by learning and obsessed with science. Watch the full documentary now (playlist - 2 hours, 56 minutes)

The Beauty of Diagrams Series in which mathematician Marcus du Sautoy explores the stories behind some of the most familiar scientific diagrams. Vitruvian Man - He looks at Leonardo da Vinci's world-famous diagram of the perfect human body, which has many layers from anatomy to architecture, and defines our species like no other drawing before or since. The Vitruvian Man, drawn in the 1480s when he was living and working in Milan, has become one of the most famous images in the world. Leonardo's drawings form a vast body of work, covering every imaginable subject in spectacular detail: from feet, skulls and hands to muscles and sinews; from hearts and lungs to buildings, bridges and flying machines. Copernicus - When Polish priest and astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus developed his extraordinary theory of a sun-centered universe 500 years ago, he was flying in the face of both science and religion. To explain what he had done, Newton created a diagram. Florence Nightingale - Can a diagram save lives?

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