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Reading Your Textbooks Effectively and Efficiently

Reading Your Textbooks Effectively and Efficiently
More details Skip to main content Dartmouth College Academic Skills Center Quick Links Home > Assess your Learning Style > Active Reading: Comprehension and Rate Many college students discover that there is significantly more to read in college than there was in high school. Read every word.One reading is sufficient.Don't skip passages.Machines improve speed.A faster rate means less comprehension. Handouts Reading Myths: Active Reading Strategies: Where to Read: The Reading Environment (28K Word) Videos Reading Improvement Video (10:48 Minutes) Reading Improvement Video with Captions (10:48 minutes) Learning Links A Classic Method for Studying Texts: SQ3R - Dartmouth College Active Reading Strategies – Princeton University Rapid Reading – Cornell University Concept Mapping – Cornell University Guide to Reading Primary Sources – University of Pennsylvania Miniversity Course Improving Reading Speed and Comprehension Speed Reading Contact Collis Miniversity for more information. Contact Us Related:  Edu Theory

The Straight-A Gospels: Pseudo-Work Does Not Equal Work July 26th, 2007 · 78 comments This is the first post in a three-part series focusing on the Straight-A Gospels — the core concepts behind my book, How to Become a Straight-A Student. Today we focus on Gospel #1: Pseudo-work does not equal work Here are two facts: (1) I made straight A’s in college. (2) I studied less than most people I know. The same holds true for many of the straight-A students I researched for my book. work accomplished = time spent studying The more time you study the more work you accomplish. To understand our accomplishment, you must understand the following, more accurate formula: work accomplished = time spent x intensity of focus That last factor — intensity of focus — is the key to explaining why straight-A students never seem to embark on the same fatigue-saturated all-night study adventures that most undergrads rely on. Intensity of Focus over Time for Marathon Session Approach hour 1 : 10 hour 2 : 9 hour 3 : 5 hour 4 : 2 hour 5-10 : 1

Review Redux: Introducing Literary Criticism Through Reception Moments ReadWriteThink couldn't publish all of this great content without literacy experts to write and review for us. If you've got lessons plans, activities, or other ideas you'd like to contribute, we'd love to hear from you. More Find the latest in professional publications, learn new techniques and strategies, and find out how you can connect with other literacy professionals. More Teacher Resources by Grade Your students can save their work with Student Interactives. More Home › Classroom Resources › Lesson Plans Lesson Plan Overview From Theory to Practice Using Lorraine Hansberry's A Raisin in the Sun, this lesson introduces high school students to the idea that literary works do not contain fixed meaning but are open to interpretation. back to top Sullivan, P. (2002). Literary works do not contain a single "correct" meaning.

7 CRITICAL READING STRATEGIES 1. Previewing: Learning about a text before really reading it. Previewing enables readers to get a sense of what the text is about and how it is organized before reading it closely. 2. When you read a text, you read it through the lens of your own experience. 3. As students, you are accustomed (I hope) to teachers asking you questions about your reading. 4. The reading that you do for this class might challenge your attitudes, your unconsciously held beliefs, or your positions on current issues. 5. Outlining and summarizing are especially helpful strategies for understanding the content and structure of a reading selection. Summarizing begins with outlining, but instead of merely listing the main ideas, a summary recomposes them to form a new text. 6. All writers make assertions that they want you to accept as true. 7. Many of the authors we read are concerned with the same issues or questions, but approach how to discuss them in different ways. Back to Academic Success Page

The National Academies Press Overview Authors Michael Hout and Stuart W. Elliott, Editors; Committee on Incentives and Test-Based Accountability in Public Education; National Research Council Description In recent years there have been increasing efforts to use accountability systems based on large-scale tests of students as a mechanism for improving student achievement. Incentives and Test-Based Accountability in Education reviews and synthesizes relevant research from Incentives and Test-Based Accountability in Education reviews and synthesizes relevant research from economics, psychology, education, and related fields about how incentives work in educational accountability systems. For the first time, research and theory on incentives from the fields of economics, psychology, and educational measurement have all been pulled together and synthesized. [read less] Suggested Citation National Research Council. Import this citation to:

25 Things You Should Know About Word Choice 1. A Series Of Word Choices Here’s why this matters: because both writing and storytelling comprise, at the most basic level, a series of word choices. 2. Words are like LEGO bricks: the more we add, the more we define the reality of our playset. 3. You know that game — “Oh, you’re cold, colder, colder — oh! 4. Think of it like a different game, perhaps: you’re trying to say as much as possible with as few words as you can muster. 5. Finding the perfect word is as likely as finding a downy-soft unicorn with a pearlescent horn riding a skateboard made from the bones of your many enemies. 6. For every right word, you have an infinity of wrong ones. 7. You might use a word that either oversteps or fails to meet the idea you hope to present. 8. Remember how I said earlier that words are like LEGO, blah blah blah help define reality yadda yadda poop noise? 9. Incorrect word choice means you’re using the wrong damn word. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. Am. 15. No, really. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23.

Literary element Literary elements[edit] References[edit] Ten Study Methods That Work - Learning Center - Chadron State College Studying effectively is not a matter of chance. Educators and psychologists have researched study methods for years. Some of the best studies come from the top universities: Stanford, Indiana, and Chicago where precise experiments with student groups have shed light on the most effective study methods. Students who follow these methods learn more easily, retain material for longer periods of time, and save themselves hours of study time. 1. Set aside certain hours of each day for study just as you do for nourishment and sleep. 2. If concentration is your problem, then the right surroundings will help you greatly. 3. Your study desk or table should be equipped with all the materials you might need to complete the assignment, e.g., pencils, pens, erasers, paper clips, stapler, dictionary, snacks, and liquid refreshments, etc. 4. Can you imagine an athlete-in-training waiting for inspiration to strike to practice in preparation for an event? 5. 6. 7. Flash cards aren’t just for kids! 8.

Writer’s Digest - Writing Prompts Write a scene that includes a character speaking a different language, speaking in a thick accent, or otherwise speaking in a way that is unintelligibe to the other characters. (Note: You don't necessarily need to know the language the character is speaking—be creative with it!) Describe a character's reaction to something without explaining what it is. See if your fellow prompt responders can guess what it is. Write a story or a scene about one character playing a prank on another. Writing Prompt: Write a story that involves confusion over homonyms (words that have the same spelling but different meanings) or homophones (words that sound the same but are spelled differently). For World Storytelling Day, share the best story you've ever heard or told by word of mouth, or have a fictional character recount their favorite story. You're making your way down a cobbled street when a stocky, red-bearded man beckons you into an alley. Consider your handwriting, or a character's handwriting.

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