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WebSocket

WebSocket
WebSocket is a protocol providing full-duplex communications channels over a single TCP connection. The WebSocket protocol was standardized by the IETF as RFC 6455 in 2011, and the WebSocket API in Web IDL is being standardized by the W3C. Technical overview[edit] Browser implementation[edit] WebSocket protocol handshake[edit] To establish a WebSocket connection, the client sends a WebSocket handshake request, for which the server returns a WebSocket handshake response, as shown in the following example:[9]:section 1.2 Client request: GET /chat HTTP/1.1 Host: server.example.com Upgrade: websocket Connection: Upgrade Sec-WebSocket-Key: x3JJHMbDL1EzLkh9GBhXDw== Sec-WebSocket-Protocol: chat, superchat Sec-WebSocket-Version: 13 Origin: Server response: HTTP/1.1 101 Switching Protocols Upgrade: websocket Connection: Upgrade Sec-WebSocket-Accept: HSmrc0sMlYUkAGmm5OPpG2HaGWk= Sec-WebSocket-Protocol: chat Note that each line ends with an EOL (end of line) sequence, \r\n. Proxy traversal[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WebSocket

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Using WebSockets in WebLogic Server - 12c (12.1.2) In WebLogic Server, you can use the WebSocket Protocol implementation and accompanying programming API to develop and deploy applications that communicate bidirectionally with clients. Although you can use WebSockets for any type of client-server communication, the implementation is most commonly used to communicate with browsers running Web pages that use the WebSocket API. Understanding the WebLogic Server WebSockets Implementation The WebLogic Server WebSockets implementation includes the following components:

Internet protocol suite The Internet protocol suite is the computer networking model and set of communications protocols used on the Internet and similar computer networks. It is commonly known as TCP/IP, because its most important protocols, the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) and the Internet Protocol (IP), were the first networking protocols defined in this standard. Often also called the Internet model, it was originally also known as the DoD model, because the development of the networking model was funded by DARPA, an agency of the United States Department of Defense. TCP/IP provides end-to-end connectivity specifying how data should be packetized, addressed, transmitted, routed and received at the destination.

Comet (programming) Comet is a web application model in which a long-held HTTP request allows a web server to push data to a browser, without the browser explicitly requesting it.[1][2] Comet is an umbrella term, encompassing multiple techniques for achieving this interaction. All these methods rely on features included by default in browsers, such as JavaScript, rather than on non-default plugins. The Comet approach differs from the original model of the web, in which a browser requests a complete web page at a time.[3] Universal Plug and Play Universal Plug and Play (UPnP) is a set of networking protocols that permits networked devices, such as personal computers, printers, Internet gateways, Wi-Fi access points and mobile devices to seamlessly discover each other's presence on the network and establish functional network services for data sharing, communications, and entertainment. UPnP is intended primarily for residential networks without enterprise-class devices. The UPnP technology is promoted by the UPnP Forum.

Dave Ferguson's Blog: Websockets demo: Log Watcher So, I really wanted to create a demo for websockets that was not the norm. I wanted to try something that was more of a "what could I really do with with this" demo. After bouncing around a few ideas I finally settled on this, Log Watcher. Digital Living Network Alliance The Digital Living Network Alliance (DLNA) is a nonprofit collaborative trade organization established by Sony in June 2003, that is responsible for defining interoperability guidelines to enable sharing of digital media between multimedia devices.[3] These guidelines are built upon existing public standards, but the guidelines themselves are private (available for a fee). These guidelines specify a set of restricted ways of using the standards to achieve interoperability and include almost no free audio formats and only the most common (free or otherwise) video formats, meaning that DLNA servers generally have to support transcoding in order to produce a useful service.[4] DLNA uses Universal Plug and Play (UPnP) for media management, discovery and control.[5] UPnP defines the type of device that DLNA supports ("server", "renderer", "controller") and the mechanisms for accessing media over a network. History[edit] Specification[edit]

Web Service Architecture A Web service is a method of communications between two electronic devices over a network. It is a software function provided at a network address over the web with the service always on as in the concept of utility computing. The W3C defines a Web service as: a software system designed to support interoperable machine-to-machine interaction over a network. The WebSocket API Abstract This specification defines an API that enables Web pages to use the WebSocket protocol (defined by the IETF) for two-way communication with a remote host. Status of This document This section describes the status of this document at the time of its publication. Other documents may supersede this document. A list of current W3C publications and the most recently formally published revision of this technical report can be found in the W3C technical reports index at

BitTorrent Programmer Bram Cohen, a former University at Buffalo graduate student in Computer Science,[4] designed the protocol in April 2001 and released the first available version on July 2, 2001,[5] and the final version in 2008.[6] BitTorrent clients are available for a variety of computing platforms and operating systems including an official client released by Bittorrent, Inc. As of 2009, BitTorrent reportedly had about the same number of active users online as viewers of YouTube and Facebook combined.[7][8] As of January 2012[update], BitTorrent is utilized by 150 million active users (according to BitTorrent, Inc.). Based on this figure, the total number of monthly BitTorrent users can be estimated at more than a quarter of a billion.[9] Description[edit] The middle computer is acting as a seed to provide a file to the other computers which act as peers. The file being distributed is divided into segments called pieces.

Log4Play: Log4j Appender and UI with Play Framework, Knockout.js and WebSockets We Recommend These Resources Log4Play is a Play! Framework module that provides a log4j appender which publishes log entries to an EventStream. In theory, you can use it from any Java application that uses log4j, but I have only tested it with a Play! Post-WIMP The reason WIMP interfaces have become so prevalent since their conception at Xerox PARC is that they are very good at abstracting work-spaces, documents, and their actions. Their analogous paradigm to documents as paper sheets or folders makes WIMP interfaces easy to introduce to other users.[1] Furthermore their basic representations as rectangular regions on a 2D flat screen make them a good fit for system programmers, thus favouring the abundance of commercial widget toolkits in this style. However WIMP interfaces are not optimal for working with complex tasks such as computer-aided design, working on large amounts of data simultaneously, or interactive games.

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