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How to Properly Research Online (and Not Embarrass Yourself with the Results)

How to Properly Research Online (and Not Embarrass Yourself with the Results)
Warning: if you are going to argue a point about politics, medicine, animal care, or gun control, then you better take the time to make your argument legit. Spending 10 seconds with Google and copy-pasting wikipedia links doesn't cut it. The standard for an intelligent argument is Legitimate research is called RE-search for a reason: patient repetition and careful filtering is what will win the day. There are over 86 billion web pages published, and most of those pages are not worth quoting. To successfully sift it all, you must use consistent and reliable filtering methods. If you are a student, or if you are seeking serious medical, professional, or historical information, definitely heed these 8 suggested steps to researching online:

http://netforbeginners.about.com/od/navigatingthenet/tp/How-to-Properly-Research-Online.htm

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Internet Search Tips and Strategies .:VirtualSalt Robert Harris Version Date: July 6, 2000 Overview Project Information Literacy: Smart Talks Howard Rheingold: "Crap Detection 101: Required Coursework" Project Information Literacy, "Smart Talks," no. 5, January 3, 2011 Subscribe our Smart Talk RSS feed Printer-friendly version Photo Credit: Judith Maas Rheingold the-100-most-useful-websites-the-internet Back in September 2014, it was estimated that there are now over one billion websites on the internet, with that number increasing every second. With so many sites out there, it can be extremely difficult to locate a resource that will actually fulfil your needs and help you with your projects or inquires. Fortunately, the list below features over 100 websites you can use for almost any creative project, intellectual research or simply for fun! TallTweets lets you write tweets longer than 140 characters, and Tubemogel.com allows you to upload video to multiple sites at once, including Youtube. Wordle.net helps to summarise large pieces of text by creating a word cloud of the most common words, and Wolframalpha will answer almost anything immediately so you don’t have to rummage through Google.

Message to My Freshman Students  For the first time in many years I am teaching a freshman course, Introduction to Philosophy. The experience has been mostly good. I had been told that my freshman students would be apathetic, incurious, inattentive, unresponsive and frequently absent, and that they would exude an insufferable sense of entitlement. I am happy to say that this characterization was not true of most students. Finding Free Images for Your Classroom The Internet has made a myriad of material readily available to a vast audience. Along with these seemingly infinite resources has come a lot of confusion about how images and other content published online should be legally recognized, protected or used. As educators, we often struggle in navigating that road. I recently read an amusing but instructive article entitled “PSA: Don’t Let Salami and Google Images Get You In Hot Water.” It tells the story of an eleven-year-old boy who posted an image he found online of Salami on a class blog.

Free login to any site It's simple! This service is made for you to save your time on registration for many sites. You can not register at all sites, so just type the name of site for which you need to enter login and password and click «Get». Tips: Our project is constantly developing and we try to keep our database in actual state, use more of our services. 10 free tools for creating infographics For all the importance we place on text, it's an indisputable fact that images are processed in the brain faster than words. Hence the rise and rise of the infographic which, at its best, transforms complex information into graphics that are both easy to grasp and visually appealing. No wonder magazine readers and web visitors love the best infographics.

The Illustrated Guide to a Ph.D. Imagine a circle that contains all of human knowledge: By the time you finish elementary school, you know a little: By the time you finish high school, you know a bit more: With a bachelor's degree, you gain a specialty: A master's degree deepens that specialty: Reading research papers takes you to the edge of human knowledge:

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