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Photo-printed Hair Ribbon

Photo-printed Hair Ribbon
Robin over at inkodye.com just sent over this fantastic tutorial to showcase their fantastic photo-sensitive permanent dye. This product really ticks all of the boxes for me, because it works on so many different materials (including wood and leather), and it connects to my love of all things photographic. Here is Robin’s tutorial: Only with Inkodye can you create this incredibly easy and rewarding DIY project! Use your ribbon in your hair, around your waist on a summer dress or cut it into sections and give them away as adorable bookmarks! Total tutorial time: 15 minutes Used in this project: Inkodye Violet Materials. Making your own negatives. Prepare. Position. Pour. Brush. Place. Pin. Smooth. Take into the sun. Wait. Uncover. Wash. Dry. Enjoy! Related:  Ropa(clothes)

Lined Paper Tee Tutorial by Maybe Matilda I’m pretty dang excited to be guest posting on U Create, of all places, with an easy and fun project for you. Just in time for heading back to school, I came up with this cute top: My name is Rachel, and I blog over Maybe Matilda. I’m from small-town New York, currently living in Utah with my soon-to-be-chiropractor husband and our soon-to-be-one-year-old son. When I’m not sweeping up Cheerios, I love sewing and crocheting for my etsy shop, and sharing what I make on my blog. I think this lined paper tee is such a fun way to bring out the inner student, and possibly even encourage a little bookishness in a little one (maybe that’s a stretch, but a girl can hope, right?). It’s really simple to put together, and you can easily make it in any size. Here’s what you’ll need to make this tee: a white tank, tee, or onesie masking tape foam brush blue and red acrylic paint fabric painting medium (available at craft stores–you’ll find it with the paint supplies)

Japanese Packaging Templates - Best Used With Card Stock or Color Paper I’m not sure how I discovered this awesome collection of packaging templates but I’m glad I did! Some professor or student at a japanese univeresity was nice enough to share all their packaging templates with the world! These are a few of my favorites and you can see all of them on their website. Every situation is covered! You sell Bon Bons? P.S. stumbleupon

Tutorials for Recycling T-Shirts So way way back, in June, I wrote this Studio Organization post, about starting the process of organizing my studio by cleaning out the closet full of junk. Well, it's September and...let's just say the closet is a work in progress. Some of the things that are taking up space in the closet are shirts that I never wear anymore. I realized I could repurpose them into something else! Here are some tutorials for recycling shirts: Check out these t-shirt scarves! Create cute little bows for accessories or packaging with this tutorial. Gorgeous ruffled pillow tutorial here. Looks like I have a lot of projects ahead of me to keep me from cleaning out my closet!

Wine cork bath mat - Craftynest Inspired by CB2's bamboo bath mat I’m evidently on a hot-glue kick lately. This bath mat requires just three materials: shelf liner, hot glue, and 175 wine corks. How did I gather 175 wine corks, you ask? It was inspired by CB2’s bamboo bath mat, which is perfectly lovely and affordable but too big for my tiny bathroom, hence this equally eco-friendly version. Yeah, but how durable is it, you say? How to make a wine cork bath mat Supplies 175 wine corks (plus a few extra to allow for mistakes)hot glue sticksnon-adhesive shelf liner (I used Duck brand Smooth Top Easy Liner in taupe, found at Walmart. Tools pocket knife (sharpened)cutting board (one that you won’t mind if it gets slightly damaged)rotary cutter and mat (or scissors)long ruler or yardstickhot glue guncoarse sand paper 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

how to transfer a photo to fabric Did you know you can transfer photos to fabric without using iron-on sheets? I love this technique. It's simple to execute and the end results are really pretty. It's another method for hand printing! I made some fabrics the other day and used them to add pockets to one of my wool skirts. Supplies Needed: Fabric (I used white quilting cotton), Gel Medium (I used this kind from Liquidex ), Paint Brush and the image you want to transfer. How to transfer a photo to fabric: 1. Note: Don't be alarmed if your transfer isn't completely perfect. Well there you go! How to Make a Three-Dimensional Wall Hanging Ready to craft? This project is so easy, anyone can do it. Before you start making excuses, let me tell you, I’d never painted before. Need some ideas? Use different kinds of sticks. Maybe leave off the bird and use butterflies. This project should take two days. Day 1, Step 1 in creating your own three-dimensional wall art: Paint your canvases with some acrylic paint. Step 2: Leave the canvases to dry and start preparing your foliage. Step 3: If you plan to use an additional color on your canvases (I mixed some white and light grey to make the moon) you can go ahead and add that. See the final assembly tips on day two after the paint dries on Page Two! About Erica Mueller Erica Mueller has written 22 posts in this blog. Erica Mueller is a stay-at-home mom to two lively little boys. Pages: 1 2

RIT Dye Tutorial It happens to me every year. The second spring hits, I’m standing in front of my closet going, I am so sick of all my clothes, if I see that shirt again I’ll throw up, but I don’t have any money for new stuff, I’M SO TIRED OF EVERYTHING I OWN. You know that feeling? Let’s kill it with instant-wardrobe-transformer (aka RIT dye). RIT is a brand of clothing dye that’s been around since the 1930s. It turns drab-colored clothes and accessories into bright works of art, and I am obsessed with it. to these! And it’s not even hard. Now, there are other kinds of clothing dye out there, but I chose RIT because it’s got simple instructions on the back of the package, it costs about $3 per box, and you can find it almost everywhere in the U.S. I’m gonna show you how to do a basic stovetop dye job. But! OK! You will need: So now that we have our materials, let’s dye this elegant-yet-boring purse I found at a garage sale for a dollar! Step One: Fill your pot ¾ full with water. to this!

Tissue Flowers Tutorial, No.2 - gingerandgeorge A couple of months ago, Jenny - the very lovely editor of PaperCraft Inspirations - asked me to work up a feature on different ways to use tissue paper. You can see the results in the September issue (on sale right about now), and alongside ruffles, twists, layers, buttons and twirly skirts, there's a miniature version of an old tissue-paper favourite. I made these flowers for Halloween a couple of years ago, and although the large scale can look fantastic on card projects, it doesn't leave room for very much else. By scaling it down, you create a much more versatile embellishment and your tissue supplies will stretch a little further, too. This is especially useful if you're using patterned tissue (e.g. Tissue paper (plain or patterned) Scissors Ruler Pencil Thin wire (e.g. fuse or jewellery wire) Small button or circle of card PVA glue Measure and cut out two strips of tissue paper, each around 20cm long and 5-6cm wide. Repeat on the other side of the strip, to create a complete flower-head.

DiY crafts, free sewing tutorials & kickass clothing patterns – WhatTheCraft.com

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