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Saltwater Kids: RETRO DUFFEL bag TUTORIAL

Saltwater Kids: RETRO DUFFEL bag TUTORIAL
Boys, boys, boys. The silly things they say and do keep me laughing all the time. In fact, as I was working on this post my three year-old came blasting by, one arm outstretched, clutching his toothbrush, shouting (in a deep manly voice) "Oh, Mr. My favorite part of making this tutorial, by far, was the photo shoot. I am so excited to share this project with you because it is as fun as my two silly boys. The design of the RETRO DUFFEL is based on the original Duffel Bag - the manliest of all the bags in the luggage family. This is a miniature version of the typical duffel bag, perfect for an overnight stay at Grandma's, hauling gear to the big game, or for storing my all-time favorite gift - the FORT KIT! OK, lets get started! Materials: 1/2 yard Fashion Denim (or similar fabric) 16” SEPARATING zipper* (the key to this project is the separating zipper)Jean/denim sewing machine needle 76” of 1½” wide webbing OR make your own (77” X 6” white fashion denim, or similar fabric) Cut: Pin and sew.

Zippered iPhone Wallet - tutorial Do you ever go out and all you want to take is your phone and maybe your keys and a credit card? But you don't have any pockets? This little wallet is the solution. It snugly fits your iPhone and a couple of cards, and I added a handy little clip for my keys. I originally made this to clip to the Ergo when I go out for a walk, but it's really handy so I've been using it for more than just that. It's such a quick project that I've been making them up for friends too! You can see I've put different straps on each of these. one has an elastic wrist strap and the other has a snap fastened strap so that I can hook it on the Ergo. Zippered iPhone Wallet You'll need: Main fabric - 2 pieces (10 x 15 cm, 4 x 6 inches)* Lining fabric - 2 pieces (10 x 15 cm, 4 x 6 inches)* Interfacing (optional) - 2 pieces (10 x 15 cm, 4 x 6 inches)* Zip - (15 cm, 6 inches) Key ring clip Your choice of strap** Use the measurements above to cut out your pieces for the wallet.

TUTORIAL :: SOCKS OWL | WHIMSY LOFT This is a very simple Tutorial to make a Sock Owl. I’m using the leggings sock… the one that goes from your ankle up to your knees. See photos below from left to right. Measure 5″ from the rubber and cut. We only need this part, the rest can be kept for other toys ;-). Turn the sock around and sew a straight line on the rubber part. Ones done, go to the other side (where we cut just now), and fold the opening into 3 section like the photos. The section that I am holding in the photo is about 1 cm and it’s the tail of the owl. Then continue to sew the other section (the legs sections should be longer that the tail). Turn the socks around. Here is that body of the owl. Now, use some felt to cut the eyes and nose. Sew the felt on the owl as shown in photos below. Then (refer bottom panel of photos), cut 2 pieces of felt and 2 pieces of socks in another colour (you can also use fabric). Use simple stitches to sew the pink socks on the felt, then sew them on the sides of the owl.

Perfect Box Pouch Tutorial & Make it Modern How insanely fabulous is this pouch? I can’t decide if I love it so much because a) it is made from glittery elephant fabric, b) of it’s small but perfectly proportioned size, c) it holds my on the go quilting supplies or d) all of the above. If you’d like to make your own see how below. You will need: 2 pieces of exterior fabric measuring 8 inches by 6 inches. (The longer side will be the top of your pouch, keep this in mind when cutting directional fabric)2 pieces of interior fabric measuring 8 inches by 6 inches2 pieces of mid-weight woven non-fusible interfacing (This helps add body to your bag, because without it it wouldn’t be very “boxy””1 12 inch zipperCoordinating thread (this will be visible on the outside of the bag) Things that will come in handy: rotary cuttercutting matshearscraft scissorsclear ruler Step 1: Choose and cut your fabric- is it just me or is this oftentime the hardest part? Step 2: Layer your pieces. Step 3: Stitch the layers together 1/4 in from the edge.

Circle Zip Earbud Pouch Tutorial | Dog Under My Desk I use a little zippered pouch to carry around my earbuds since they are the fancy microphone ones and I don’t want them to break or get tangled. Some of you have commented that you are looking for some small, simple gift ideas. This is definitely simple to make, and a little more fun than the typical rectangular zippered pouch! I can see these as the perfect gift for teenage cousins or nieces or girlfriends or even teacher gifts. Fun, quick, and cute! UPDATE: I have completely re-written this tutorial with twice as many bright, clear photos and more detailed instructions and it is available as a pattern in my pattern shop. First, download the pattern template HERE. Cut from main fabric: 1 circle 2 half circles 1 tab Cut from lining fabric: 1 circle 2 half circles Cut from batting (or medium weight interfacing, if you prefer): 1 circle 2 half circles You will also need a 1″ wide nylon 5″ or longer zipper. Place one lining half circle right side up and place the zipper right side up on top.

Quilted Tablet PC Cover Hi Everyone! I had the opportunity to be a Creative Guest at Ucreate last month. The tutorial I shared was for a Quilted Tablet PC Cover. A Tablet PC has been on my wish list for quite a while. I've bought a few accesories for my tablet. I looked around on Amazon, but I wasn't finding anything I liked online. Here is how I made the tablet cover: Material needed : -2 Fabric pieces, one for the outside and one for the inside. First, you need to determine the width to cut your fabric. width of the device + the depth of the device + 2.5 inches For me those numbers were 10.25 + .5 + 2.5. I could give you a long mathematical computation for the length of fabric needed, but it will be a lot easier if you just cut the fabric to 3.5 times the length of your device. I didn't take a picture of this process, but here is a close up of how mine looks in the pocket and with the flap folded over: The total fabric dimensions I used for a Galaxy Tablet was 13 3/4 wide by 22 7/8 long. Ta da!

Tutorial Tuesday: Owl Army from Moonstitches OMG, this is the cutest Tutorial Tuesday ever…or should I call it ? Whatever we call it, I’m sure you’ll agree that this owl tutorial from MOONSTITCHES is just so adorable and that you’ll want to snap it up and hug it and squeeze it and make a million of little owls. I know I do….I want to make my own adorable stuffed owl army! Alex from MOONSTICHES put together this really well done tutorial, which was inspired from a pattern she found in a book (info on the front page of the tutorial). Since Alex does not share the pattern from the book, you can buy the book (although it’s in Japanese) or come up with your own pattern and use Alex’s tutorial as an inspiration for your own owl. For more inspiration, visit the Owly Love Flickr Pool . Also, be sure to join the Tutorial Tuesday flickr group and share your owls or any pics from your completed Tutorial Tuesday projects.

DIY {doily canvas bag} & ashleyannphotography.com Thankfully everyone seems to be making a switch from plastic to lasting when it comes to shopping bags, so here’s another fun little tutorial on customizing one to make it oh so cute. You might notice a lot of doilies in my recent diy projects. Since I was getting so many ready for A Christmas Gathering I used a lot of the same materials…monograms seems to be pretty popular now too. My friend Cindy called while I was working on this and suggested I just go ahead a put a “W” on it for her, I happily obligied. Canvas bag ($2.00 when on sale at Hobby Lobby), fabric paint, paper doily, Krylon Paper Finishes Adhesive Spray : Spray doily with paper spray adhesive and press down on the bag (not shown). : Gently paint over the holes – I recommend paint meant for fabric, not crafts. : Peel back doily before paint dries. Bag after doily is removed I traced on my letter and filled it in with paint. For a cook: fill it with cooking supplies For a gardner: fill it with gardening supplies

Mega&8226;Crafty: Woven Flower Pot- Part 2 Today I finished my woven pot project. I haven't done much weaving but it was kind of relaxing once I got into a groove. (It was the perfect TV watching project). To recap, I started with a pot that I painted a creamy yellow. Then I used an all purpose craft glue to attach some of my favorite ribbons onto the bottom of the pot. My first idea was to weave wide ribbon around the pot too- but soon realized I couldn't get the ribbon to lay flat on the tapered shape of the pot. After experimenting with a few different ribbons and strings I settled on using jute. I continued weaving the jute over and under the ribbon, pulling it tight and adding a tiny dot of hot glue every so often. Marking my starting point ribbon by putting a small arrow on the bottom of the pot helped me keep track of each round. I only glued the jute down when I was going under a ribbon, never over, and I tried to keep the glue off the ribbon so I could pull it left and right to straighten it as I wove. 1. And 2. So I wove,

Super cute sewing tutorials Have you visited Anna Graham's blog Noodlehead yet? If you like to sew things that are so cute you can't stand it, rush right over there. Here's her free tutorial for gathered clutches (also available as a PDF pattern with other styling options for purchase right here.) Or maybe you want a little zippered pouch with a key ring. Tutorial here. Maybe you want that zippered wallet to have some adorable detailing. Or maybe you want to sew a bike basket, a diaper keeper, a mail organizer, or a host of other useful things listed on Anna's blog. To see the lovely things others have made from her tutorials, like Yellow Poplar's pouches above, visit the Noodlehead Tutorials Flickr pool.

20 Crafty Ways To Use Up Fabric Scraps : Posted on | November 8, 2008 | 2 Comments My grandmother always had a mountain of fabric scraps. Leftovers from sewing projects, hems cut off pants, recycled out-of-style skirts, old pillowcases; everything was added to the pile. If you have your own fabric scraps, here are 20 crafty uses for your excessive of riches. 1. Patchwork quilts were first designed to use up small, leftover pieces of fabric. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 1/2 yard of stretchy fabric can be made into a beret. 10. 11 & 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. Comments Envelope Clutch & The Hybrid Chick I made a cash envelope clutch in January for the Paper Craft Planet challenge, and had a few requests on how to assemble it. So here it is, another sassy clutch using the Envelope Template. Supply List: Template: Standard Envelope Template Set by Kelleigh Ratzlaff Designs Digital papers: Share the Moments Designer Kit by Danielle Engebretson Ribbons: Thin flat ribbons like binding tape, or Taffeta ribbon recommended Others: Magnet snaps, thread and needle, sticky double sided tape or glue. For the paper clutch, I printed two of the envelope templates on both sides of the paper, one for front flap & back body, and the other one for the front body. I cut out some flaps and added extra score lines to make into a clutch. If you want, you could enlarge the templates a bit to make it bigger than the envelopes that will go inside. Coat with a glossy glue/sealer like Mod Podge to make it sturdier. Add the double sided tape on the bottom flap (front body piece) to the other piece. Flatten it down.

how to transfer a photo to fabric Did you know you can transfer photos to fabric without using iron-on sheets? I love this technique. It's simple to execute and the end results are really pretty. It's another method for hand printing! Supplies Needed: Fabric (I used white quilting cotton), Gel Medium (I used this kind from Liquidex), Paint Brush and the image you want to transfer. How to transfer a photo to fabric: 1. Note: Don't be alarmed if your transfer isn't completely perfect. Well there you go! How to Weave on a Cardboard Loom June 25th, 2008 Email 1322 users recommend Weaving like this can be the basis for so many projects: place mats, coasters, bags, hats—use your imagination. All photos by Diane Gilleland Keep your edges a little loose, and they'll stay nice and straight. An ordinary salad fork makes a great tool for keeping your weaving snug. Photo: All photos by Diane Gilleland Weaving is such a meditative, relaxing craft—and at the end of it, you have fabric! I like to re-use cardboard shipping envelopes for my simple looms. Begin by deciding how wide you want your weaving to be. Next, measure and mark every 1/4 inch along the edge of your cardboard, working between the two width marks you made in the previous step. Draw a line 1/2 inch from the edge of the cardboard. Use a pair of strong scissors to cut a series of slits in the edge of the envelope, 1/4 inch apart. Repeat these steps on the opposite edge of the cardboard. Time to string your loom! Here's a shot of the back of the loom. Ready to weave?

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