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Your Picks: Top 100 Science-Fiction, Fantasy Books

Your Picks: Top 100 Science-Fiction, Fantasy Books
More than 5,000 of you nominated. More than 60,000 of you voted. And now the results are in. The winners of NPR's Top 100 Science-Fiction and Fantasy survey are an intriguing mix of classic and contemporary titles. Over on NPR's pop culture blog, Monkey See, you can find one fan's thoughts on how the list shaped up, get our experts' take, and have the chance to share your own. A quick word about what's here, and what's not: Our panel of experts reviewed hundreds of the most popular nominations and tossed out those that didn't fit the survey's criteria (after — we assure you — much passionate, thoughtful, gleefully nerdy discussion). So, at last, here are your favorite science-fiction and fantasy novels.

My "top ten" books every student of International Relations should read Last week Tom Ricks offered us his "Top Ten list" of books any student of military history should read. The FP staff asked me to follow suit with some of my favorites from the world of international politics and foreign policy. What follows aren't necessarily the books I'd put on a graduate syllabus; instead, here are ten books that either had a big influence on my thinking, were a pleasure to read, or are of enduring value for someone trying to make sense of contemporary world politics. 1). An all-time classic, which I first read as a college sophomore. 2). Combines biology and macro-history in a compelling fashion, explaining why small differences in climate, population, agronomy, and the like turned out to have far-reaching effects on the evolution of human societies and the long-term balance of power. 3). He's a Nobel Prize winner now, so one expects a lot of smart ideas. 4). 5). 6). 7). Why do bad things happen to good peoples? 8). 9). So what did I miss?

Home - Theoryland of the Wheel of Time (Robert Jordan) The Cult's 'Top 10' Books of 2010 It's that time of year again at The Cult when we appropriate Valentine's Day (close enough) for our own celebration as book smitten fiends. That of course, means publishing our second annual Top Ten list of books from the previous year. It's not only fitting to post this on V-day, but pragmatic too, as I get a lot of books in December and need a month or so to finish up my year-end reading. These go to eleven. Or rather, this list goes to eleven, but let me explain. Caveats: This list is based on my own highly personal and promiscuous reading habits and does not necessarily reflect our other voracious readers at The Cult, nor are they Chuck’s personal favorites or recommendations. (In alphabetical order!) "Sunset Park" by Paul Auster I enjoyed this nostalgic paen to a Brooklyn neighborhood with its topical but understated observations on the American housing scandal- but with some reservations. Read More On 'Sunset Park' Here "Slut Lullabies" by Gina Frangello "Great House" by Nicole Krauss

The Holy Innocents (novel) The Holy Innocents (1988) is a novel by Gilbert Adair about incestuous siblings and the stranger who enters their world. Its themes were inspired[1] by Jean Cocteau's novel Les Enfants Terribles (The Holy Terrors) and by the film of the same name directed by Jean-Pierre Melville. Publishing[edit source | editbeta] The book has been printed in hardcover and paperback only once. Remaining copies of the original novel fetch hefty prices on auction websites such as eBay. Plot[edit source | editbeta] The Holy Innocents is the story of three young cinephiles, Matthew, an American studying in Paris, and the French twins Guillaume and Danielle. Adaptation[edit source | editbeta] A French-British-Italian co-produced film adaptation of the novel was made in 2003, directed by Bernardo Bertolucci and starring Louis Garrel, Eva Green, and Michael Pitt. References[edit source | editbeta]

50 Most Influential Books of the Last 50 (or so) Years In compiling the books on this list, the editors at SuperScholar have tried to provide a window into the culture of the last 50 years. Ideally, if you read every book on this list, you will know how we got to where we are today. Not all the books on this list are “great.” The criterion for inclusion was not greatness but INFLUENCE. All the books on this list have been enormously influential. The books we chose required some hard choices. We also tried to keep a balance between books that everyone buys and hardly anyone reads versus books that, though not widely bought and read, are deeply transformative. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 45.

20 Best Websites To Download Free EBooks We understand that reading is the simplest way for human to derive and constructing meaning in order to gain a particular knowledge from a source. This tendency has been digitized when books evolve into digital media equivalent – E-Books. It would be nice if we’re able to download free e-book and take it with us. That’s why we’ve again crawled deep into the Internet to compile this list of 20 places to download free e-books for your use. Great Websites to Download Ebooks FreeBookSpot FreeBookSpot is an online source of free ebooks download with 4485 FREE E-BOOKS in 96 categories which up to 71,97 GB. You can search and download free books in categories like scientific, engineering, programming, fiction and many other books. 4eBooks 4eBooks has a huge collection of computer programming ebooks. Free-eBooks Free-eBooks is an online source for free ebook downloads, ebook resources and ebook authors. You need to become a Free-EBooks.Net member to access their library. ManyBooks GetFreeEBooks Scribd

10 great science fiction novels that have been banned @djscruffy: And that's why you're a heathen and should be burned at the stake. @djscruffy: In defense of public schools, I would suggest that the reason many of these books are challenged so often is that they're frequently included in school curriculums and libraries. I grew up in a state that, according to these links, engaged in book-burning less than a decade before my birth. That makes me shudder. I suppose I've wandered a bit. @djscruffy: To be fair, it's not usually the schools that want to ban the books, but the few overprotective parents who make wild assumptions about the books we try to teach. Most of us really try to teach the kids to think, rather than becoming nice little automatons.

Leanpub: Publish Early, Publish Often 13 Business Books That Will Blow Your Mind Having never taken a business class in college I find that I read and listen to a lot of business books to round out my education. The books usually aren't "How to Manage Your Cash Flow" but rather get me to rethink the way I run my business, which--despite no business classes or diploma--continues to be in business 13 plus years after I started it. In that time, here are 13 of the books that had the biggest impact on how I run my business (in no particular order): Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us by Daniel Pink: If you supervise anyone in your business, this book is a must read. The Knack: How Street-Smart Entrepreneurs Learn to Handle Whatever Comes Up by Norm Brodsky and Bo Burlingham: I wanted to have at least one book that was dedicated to small business and the entrepreneurial spirit. The beauty of this list is that I get to leave off a whole bunch of mind-blowing business books that you can't believe didn't make the list.

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