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Paper Roses

Paper Roses

Packaging Templates I’m not sure how I discovered this awesome collection of packaging templates but I’m glad I did! Some professor or student at a japanese univeresity was nice enough to share all their packaging templates with the world! These are a few of my favorites and you can see all of them on their website. Every situation is covered! P.S. stumbleupon Rolled Paper Roses Welcome to flower week – five days of simple and delightful flower projects. I could probably do three weeks of flowers because there are so many different ways to create them, but I’ve limited it to five of my current favorites. Before we get started, let me make a few disclaimers: 1. I find inspiration for projects all over the place {online, in shops, in magazines}, then figure out how to re-create them on my own. 2. 3. Okay, so let’s begin. Here’s what you’ll need: :: paper {either cover or text weight} :: florist wire :: scissors, pencil, glue gun STEP ONE: cut irregular circle This circle is approximately 8 inches, but you can do any size you wish. STEP TWO: cut spiral Start at the outside edge and cut in a spiral fashion to the center. I like a sort of bumpy shape so that the petals end up a bit irregular If you aren’t so sure about your cutting skills, feel free to draw your spiral before cutting. STEP THREE: roll your blossom start at the outside edge and coil tightly And your flower grows.

Hair Flower 29 May 2010 These elegant fabric flowers are very simple to make . . . and only take a few basic supplies. The finished product is delightfully lovely, and at times can look like a real flower! Every flower will turn out differently and that is part of the beauty! If you haven’t used those tea lights in a while, now’s the time! Supplies: · Synthetic Silky Fabric · Scissors · Candle (preferably a tea light) Additional supplies: · Needle and Thread, Glue Dots or Glue Gun · Buttons and/or Beads Directions: 1. Make the largest one’s diameter about half an inch larger than you want the diameter of the flower, as the petals will end up shrinking a bit. 2. You can also cut around the pattern and skip the drawing part, it just might not be as uniform . . . but with these, uniform isn’t necessary. 3. Cut just inside the drawn lines to make a circle out of the fabric. 4. Be very careful (please have adult supervision, this is rather dangerous), as it is very easy to get burnt. 5.

Money Gift Box Gift Box This box made from two bills. The bills/box can be the gift itself, but it is also just about the right size for a ring box. (Perhaps a dollar-bill ring?) Get yourself two fairly new, crisp bills. Older "soggier" bills are much harder to work with. Lay the bill on a flat surface, face up. Fold the note top-to-bottom just to the right of the portrait, then unfold. Starting at the top left corner (as illustrated), close the top third fold to about 90 degrees. Inside this corner will be a remaining portion that you will crease along the natural 45 degree line to complete the corner. Complete the previous step for the other three corners. For each tab, pull it inside the box, folding so that the natural edge of the box is pulled slightly over inside the fold. Do this evenly for both tabs. For the two other sides, evenly fold over the edge of the bill. You should now have an open box. I do not like the way that looks, so I close the box another way as illustrated below. Back

Paper Flower Tutorials & Templates Here’s a lovely assortment of paper flowers to make, I’ve organized them in a few sections for easier browsing: Bouquets & Centerpieces, Tissue Paper, Crepe, Origami and the rest under general tutorials. Many of these have free templates to download and most are surprisingly easy to make! I’ve also compiled a vintage booklet into a pdf tutorial that you can download. Ready to see what’s available from around the net? ninthstreeteast.blogspot.com Stained Glass Style: Made with black construction paper and tissue paper of various colors. Double Fringe: You will need double-sided colored paper, scissors, glue, a ready-made or a do-it-yourself slotted tool, or just a wooden toothpick. increations.blogspot.com cheekymagpie.com Tulips: These are made with double sided decorative paper. Ornaments: Easy project made with cheap computer paper. howaboutorange.blogspot.com kindawonderful.typepad.com Popup: Made with pages from a magazine. marthastewart.com craftstylish.com etsy.com wendysmedley.typepad.com Tissue

Giant Paper Rose Flower If you loved the beautiful DIY wedding this morning and Nata’s gorgeous paper flower bouquets, you are in luck as Nata is sharing how she crafted them with us! She was inspired by a template created by Morgan Levine on Martha Stewart (as was I in the flowers I created for this styled shoot). I just love that this basic idea has inspired different brides to create their own version of giant paper flowers – you might remember these equally awesome giant paper flowers from this wedding I shared last year. :) Thanks so much Nata for sharing how you created your giant pink paper rose + special thanks to Studio Castillero for the photos of the DIY + her wedding! Materials (to make one giant rose) Step 1: Cut the petals Cut 5-6 teardrop petals and 15-6 heart-shaped petals from the petal colored crepe paper. IMPORTANT: Crepe paper is directional so it matters which way you’re cutting the paper. Repeat until all of your petals are cut Step 2: Cut the leaves + calyx Step 3: Make the rose stem

Make A Bow With A Fork I made this fork bow tutorial for you. It's very easy and makes cute little bows that can be tied to favors, small earring boxes, homemade Christmas ornaments and more! I used an old, big serving fork to demonstrate, but you can use a regular size fork or dowels glued on a wooden base. Picture 1 Below: All you need is some kind of 4 pronged fork, ribbon and a pair of scissors. Picture 2 Below: First off, start by weaving the ribbon in and out of the fork. Leave a little extra ribbon on the left and just let it lie there. Picture 3 Below: Take the ribbon on the right hand side over the top of the fork and weave the ribbon in and out. Picture 4 Below: Then, do the same thing again on the left hand side of the fork, weaving the ribbon in and out, coming the opposite direction. Picture 5 Below: Now, finish weaving in and out until you almost reach the top of the fork. Picture 6 Below: Take a separate piece of ribbon and slide it through the bottom in the middle of the fork.

Gift Ideas For Poor Souls You know how it goes, a friend calls you and invites you to dinner at the last minute. OMG! What gift can you take?! You scrabble around the cupboards trying to find a box of chocolates or a bottle of wine but find that most of the chocolates have been eaten and the wine has gone. I thought this was a wonderful idea. Supplies: Patterned paper-one 12 x 12" sheet. These directions will give you one flower. 1. 4. 5. Tip: For single sided paper. 6. Note: Florist tape is stretchy, just play with it and pull gently but firmly as you move down the stem. 7. Note, you will have to play around with the height of the petals, and where on the petal you start your tape. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. For tutorials on how to market yourself online, go here.

Paper Flowers – Anyone Can Do That | FindInspirations.com Japanese Kusudama, this tutorial is featured on Craftuts Anyone can do that, I assure you. The proof: I can, just take a quick look at my result below. Below you can see my very first attempt to create paper flowers. What you will need to make your own Kusudama paper ball? 1. 3. 4. (optionally) I prefer torn paper instead of cut. You have to start with a single petal. Now you have to glue your 5 petals into a flower. Apply the glue to only one side of each petal, except for the last one, in this case cover both sides with glue. Your first flower is done. Don’t glue every petal right after you make it. When all 12 flowers are finished you have to glue them together. When two halves of Kusudama Flower Ball are ready you have to glue them together.

Curling Ribbon Coasters Years ago when I was a college student, I had a part time job in a card store. One day on the job, I was fiddling with the curling ribbon we used for balloons. As I twisted and curled it in my fingers, I found myself rolling it into a tight spiral. As it grew and I added more colors, I soon realized I had a really cool design forming, and without too much effort I would have a spiral of color large enough to use as a coaster. Ever since then, whenever I get balloons or gifts that are tied with curling ribbon, I save the ribbon in a special box in my craft room. Selecting the ribbon You probably haven’t been saving up used curling ribbon from balloons and packages (not yet, anyway), so you might need to buy some new ribbon to start on this project. Winding the ribbon To start your coaster, just grab a piece of ribbon and roll the end up as tightly as you can. Now for the fun part. You can see a lot of potential fun here with patterns and colors. Coat the coasters or brush-on varieties.

Zipper Rosette Bracelet Hi! I'm Heidi from Sew Craft Create. I have two sweet, little girlies and a serious addiction to all things crafty! I am so excited to be here today and today I am teaching you how to make zipper rosettes! What you need: Zippers {any color, any size} needle & thread *hard interfacing *hot glue gun Step One: Cut entire length of zipper, leaving just over a 1/4 inch on either side. Cut ends off zipper. Separate zipper. Fold 1/4 inch of the zipper onto itself. Wrap & stitch (same way) until you have 3 rows. Step Six: Insert needle through two rows (the new row and the row directly beneath it). Insert it from back of the rosette. Then insert needle from front to back. Keep wrapping and repeat step six every 1/8 inch until done. Step Seven: Once zipper is desired size, cut off remainder. Attaching to hard surface: Cut extra-heavyweight interfacing to fit rosettes. Attaching to soft surface (i.e., fabric): Skip step eight and sew directly onto fabric. All done! Attach to anything!

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