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Focus on Brain Disorders

The brain is the most complex organ in the human body, in terms of both its structure and chemical composition. Created by our genes, life experiences and the environment around us, the brain acquires, coordinates and disseminates information to control how we think, behave, learn and feel. To do this, all of the one hundred billion cells in this complex organ must effectively communicate with each other, and failure to do so may cause or contribute to brain dysfunction and mental illness. Factsheet: Overview of mental disorders

http://www.brainexplorer.org/brain_disorders/Focus_index.shtml

Related:  Brain AnatomyAnatomyDisorders

Brain Function, Anatomy & Diagram Much of the brain's job involves receiving information from the rest of the body, interpreting that information, and then guiding the body's response to it. Types of input the brain interprets include odors, light, sounds, and pain. The brain also helps perform vital operations such as breathing, maintaining blood pressure, and releasing hormones.

Difference Between Epinephrine and Norepinephrine Epinephrine vs Norepinephrine Both Epinephrine and Norepinephrine are similar chemical messengers released by adrenal medulla. Both of these messengers belong to the chemical class of catecholamine, which are derived from an amino acid called tyrosine. These adrenomedullary hormones play essential role in stress responses, arterial blood pressure, and fuel metabolism.

Dunning–Kruger effect The Dunning–Kruger effect is a cognitive bias in which low-ability individuals suffer from illusory superiority, mistakenly assessing their ability as much higher than it really is. Psychologists David Dunning and Justin Kruger attributed this bias to a metacognitive incapacity, on the part of those with low ability, to recognize their ineptitude and evaluate their competence accurately. Their research also suggests corollaries: high-ability individuals may underestimate their relative competence and may erroneously assume that tasks which are easy for them are also easy for others.[1]

The Limits of Intelligence Santiago Ramón y Cajal, the Spanish Nobel-winning biologist who mapped the neural anatomy of insects in the decades before World War I, likened the minute circuitry of their vision-processing neurons to an exquisite pocket watch. He likened that of mammals, by comparison, to a hollow-chested grandfather clock. Indeed, it is humbling to think that a honeybee, with its milligram-size brain, can perform tasks such as navigating mazes and landscapes on a par with mammals. A honeybee may be limited by having comparatively few neurons, but it surely seems to squeeze everything it can out of them.

Fallacy List 1. FAULTY CAUSE: (post hoc ergo propter hoc) mistakes correlation or association for causation, by assuming that because one thing follows another it was caused by the other. example: A black cat crossed Babbs' path yesterday and, sure enough, she was involved in an automobile accident later that same afternoon. example: The introduction of sex education courses at the high school level has resulted in increased promiscuity among teens.

Pocket Brain Version 1.0 – Review By Areo Saffarzadeh, MS3 This review is intended to provide an overview of Pocket Brain, the new interactive neuroanatomy app by eMedia and compare its features to other other iOS based neuroanatomy apps. In short, Pocket Brain is the most comprehensive, interactive, and functional neuroanatomy app out there. It is worth the investment of any student studying neuroanatomy. Neuroanatomy as a Class To be good at neuroanatomy a student needs decent visual-spatial reasoning skills. Forer effect A related and more general phenomenon is that of subjective validation.[1] Subjective validation occurs when two unrelated or even random events are perceived to be related because a belief, expectation, or hypothesis demands a relationship. Thus people seek a correspondence between their perception of their personality and the contents of a horoscope. Forer's demonstration[edit] On average, the students rated its accuracy as 4.26 on a scale of 0 (very poor) to 5 (excellent).

RGS14 Regulator of G-protein signaling 14 (RGS14) is a protein that in humans is encoded by the RGS14 gene.[1] Function[edit] RGS14 is a member of the regulator of G protein signalling family. What Does Your Body Language Say About You? How To Read Signs and Recognize Gestures - Jinxi Boo - Jinxi Boo Art by LaetitziaAs we all know, communication is essential in society. Advancements in technology have transformed the way that we correspond with others in the modern world. Because of the constant buzz in our technological world, it's easy to forget how important communicating face-to-face is.

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