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How the Internet is Revolutionizing Education - TNW Industry

How the Internet is Revolutionizing Education - TNW Industry
As connection speeds increase and the ubiquity of the Internet pervades, digital content reigns. And in this era, free education has never been so accessible. The Web gives lifelong learners the tools to become autodidacts, eschewing exorbitant tuition and joining the ranks of other self-taught great thinkers in history such as Albert Einstein, Alexander Graham Bell, Paul Allen and Ernest Hemingway. “Learning is not a product of schooling but the lifelong attempt to acquire it.” -Albert Einstein 10 years ago in April 2001, Charles M. He says, “I think there’s a wide array of reasons why faculty should be engaged in recording and publishing lectures online. So. Some of the biggest names in tech are coming to TNW Conference in Amsterdam this May. Both Yale and Stanford have followed suit, and even Harvard has jumped on board in the last two years. Open Culture Should knowledge should be open to all to both use and contribute to? Khan Academy Watch more about The Khan Academy here. Skillshare

http://thenextweb.com/insider/2011/05/14/how-the-internet-is-revolutionizing-education/

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Why Google doesn’t care about hiring top college graduates - Quartz On Dec. 4, Italians went to the polls to decide on a reform referendum that would redefine the power of local governments and reduce the power of the senate. With a high turnout, my countryman rejected the reform. In the press, the voters’ decision was described as an Italian Brexit, and a triumph of populism. Beppe Grillo and his Five Star Movement, arguably Europe’s largest populist party, celebrated with Matteo Salvini, leader of the xenophobic Northern League; Marine Le Pen sent congratulations via Twitter, claiming that Italians’ had disavowed not just their prime minister, but the entire European Union.

Sitting pretty Take one industrial designer renowned for his innovative approach and one manufacturer heralded for its environmental policy and the result is something rather ground breaking - the SAYL office chair. During its design process Yves Behar, founder of San Francisco-based design firm fuseproject, together with the development team at Herman Miller, scrutinised every part of the chair to ensure that it would be the lightest, strongest and most sustainable possible. Certainly its most innovative feature is the full suspension back, which is literally frameless. Although Herman Miller has been environmentally aware since it was first founded in Michigan in 1905, it was in 2000 that it publicly stated its intention to become a sustainable business.

Education in China (English Subtitles) Chinese education system Please use CC button to enable subtitles (Click on “CC” on the video screen, and like magic, the subtitles appear) With all this hoopla about education in China generated by the PISA exam, tiger mothers, sputnik moment etc. Here is a documentary news report that will tell you what China is thinking about talking about it’s own education system. Monitor: The net generation, unplugged Totally different from previous generations—or just younger? THEY are variously known as the Net Generation, Millennials, Generation Y or Digital Natives. But whatever you call this group of young people—roughly, those born between 1980 and 2000—there is a widespread consensus among educators, marketers and policymakers that digital technologies have given rise to a new generation of students, consumers, and citizens who see the world in a different way. Growing up with the internet, it is argued, has transformed their approach to education, work and politics. “Unlike those of us a shade older, this new generation didn't have to relearn anything to live lives of digital immersion. They learned in digital the first time around,” declare John Palfrey and Urs Gasser of the Berkman Centre at Harvard Law School in their 2008 book, “Born Digital”, one of many recent tomes about digital natives.

The Flipped Language Arts Classroom Today I received via Accomplished Teacher an article titled"How YouTube is Changing the Classroom,"which describes the innovative Flipped Classroom. For those who need a definition, a flipped classroom reverses the traditional teaching model in which a teacher presents a lesson in a whole-class setting, and students complete assignments at home. In the flip students watch short instructional videos at home and return to school for a workshop in which they complete projects and write papers. I watched part of the video about the five-paragraph essay and found myself succumbing to auditorium whiplash, but I did find the podcast interesting. I've long thought about how instructional videos and podcasting can help alleviate my own frustration from explaining and reteaching concepts to students who don't pay attention, who are chronically absent, who are in the kid clink down the hall, etc. And while I have created a few instructional videos, I'm far from accomplished.

The Case for Banning Laptops in the Classroom A colleague of mine in the department of computer science at Dartmouth recently sent an e-mail to all of us on the faculty. The subject line read: “Ban computers in the classroom?” The note that followed was one sentence long: “I finally saw the light today and propose we ban the use of laptops in class.” While the sentiment in my colleague’s e-mail was familiar, the source was surprising: it came from someone teaching a programming class, where computers are absolutely integral to learning and teaching. Surprise turned to something approaching shock when, in successive e-mails, I saw that his opinion was shared by many others in the department. My friend’s epiphany came after he looked up from his lectern and saw, yet again, an audience of laptop covers, the flip sides of which were engaged in online shopping or social-media obligations rather than in the working out of programming examples.

Culture vs. Control by Mike Kaechele This week I had the chance to visit Columbus Signature Academy in Indiana. It is part of the New Tech Network of schools which are problem based learning high schools. The first thing I noticed was the open spaces and architecture (I blogged about that here). What Are 21st-Century Skills? Learning to collaborate with others and connect through technology are essential skills in a knowledge-based economy. ATC21S started with a group of more than 250 researchers across 60 institutions worldwide who categorized 21st-century skills internationally into four broad categories: Ways of thinking. Creativity, critical thinking, problem-solving, decision-making and learningWays of working. Communication and collaborationTools for working. Information and communications technology (ICT) and information literacySkills for living in the world.

QR Code - How To Use QR Codes You may have seen these recently in various places, you may have heard people talking about them in the realm of mobile and wondered what the heck they are. Quick response codes (known as “QR” codes) are a very convenient way to display a small bit of information that is easily scanned and processed typically by mobile devices. Allowing physical items to almost become interactive, by providing information that is easily scanned like a website URL. To make a simpler analogy, most people are familiar with Universal Product codes (known as UPC codes). Everything you buy at the grocery store (and almost any store these days) has one of those that the cashier will scan.

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