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Micro compact home

Micro compact home

http://www.microcompacthome.com/

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Writer’s Block II by Cheng + Snyder Another tiny design by Cheng + Snyder that cleverly solves multiple uses. Instead of tacking a wood shed onto the side of the building, the roof and an exterior wall are pushed out to provide that exterior storage space. Here’s what the designers say about it. “Writer’s Block II is designed to fill multiple roles, providing both wood storage and a space for contemplation and study. Z-Glass Cost to Build Estimated Material Costs: $26,000 (370 sq ft) Want to know how much it will cost to have a contractor build it for you? Visit Build-Cost.net and follow these instructions. General notes about construction costs:Costs for materials are almost the same in different regions but labor costs will vary greatly depending on where you live. We provide costs with a post and pier foundation.

Floating houses Life on the Water … Why water? Why would anyone leave the stability of terra firma to live on a moving surface, in smaller quarters and relative uncertainty? The answer is simple. Water is life and water changes everything. The myth of the eight-hour sleep We often worry about lying awake in the middle of the night - but it could be good for you. A growing body of evidence from both science and history suggests that the eight-hour sleep may be unnatural. In the early 1990s, psychiatrist Thomas Wehr conducted an experiment in which a group of people were plunged into darkness for 14 hours every day for a month. It took some time for their sleep to regulate but by the fourth week the subjects had settled into a very distinct sleeping pattern. They slept first for four hours, then woke for one or two hours before falling into a second four-hour sleep.

Japanese House Built for $11,000 by Off Grid Champion - Brian Schulz The Japanese Forest House is a confluence of my love of small spaces, my passion for local materials, and my fascination with tradtional Japanese architecture. For those familiar with the intensely refined art of traditional Japanese carpentry, applying the title of 'Japanese' onto my house might be laying it on a bit thick. It's true I've fallen short of the refinement found in the homes of the upper classes, however, the work still embraces the design principles that make the traditonal tea houses (which were, ironically, modeled after peasant shacks) so appealing. Oversized beams, live edge slabs, natural timbers, real plaster walls, and minimal decoration, all encourage a deep sense of calm. What I love about this structure is that it is architecturally honest, meaning that where a lag bolt or a deck screw or a 16 penny nail was used, no attempt to was made to conceal them.

Teahouse / A1 Architects Architects: David Maštálka / A1 Architects Location: Prague, Czech Republic Client: David Maštálka and Lenka Kremenová Project year: 2008 (35 days) Contractor: Vojtěch Bilišic , scupltor and carpenter (Slovak Republic) Collaborators: Lenka Kremenová, Marta Maštálková, Rudolf Maštálka Dome construction: Jan Bašta Opponency of Diploma Project: Terunobu Fujimori , University of Tokyo Interpreting: Petr Holý, Director of Czech Center in Tokyo Surface Area: 3,75 sqm Construction Area: 7 sqm Photographs: Ester Havlová The Garden At the foot of the hill dividing Hloubetin and Aloisov you’ll find a small garden. The garden is unostentatious, slightly wild but even so graceful, each spring apple and cherry trees blossom and when summer swiftly blows upon us our sight of the passing clouds is surrounded by slim blades of grass. The teahouse as a minimal place to gather

Products / Modern Birdhouses / Modern Birdhouses™ Wieler is proud to present our Modern Birdhouses™, designed by architect Dail Dixon. The birdhouses are handmade from oil-finished teak, with stainless steel screws and sandblasted aluminum roofs. Modern Birdhouses'™ Case Study Masters Series honors the architectural pioneers who participated in the Case Study Houses Program. How cities change the weather — Per Square Mile Late in the day on June 13, 2005, a thunderstorm was bearing down on the city of Indianapolis. As the main cell approached from the southwest, it reared up, convection currents pushing it higher and higher until it towered over the city. Luckily for Indianapolis, the cloud threatened more than it menaced, eventually dumping just an inch of rain on suburbs and farm fields to the northeast. On the surface, it may not have seemed particularly special.

Small house movement The small house movement (also known as the "tiny house movement"[1]) is a famous description for the architectural and social movement that advocates living simply in small homes. Background[edit] In the United States the average size of new single family homes grew from 1,780 square feet (165 m2) in 1978 to 2,479 square feet (230.3 m2) in 2007, and to 2,662 square feet (247.3 m2) in 2013, despite a decrease in the size of the average family.[2][3] Reasons for this include increased material wealth and prestige.[2] The small house movement is a return to houses of less than 1,000 square feet (93 m2). French carpenters craft whimsical off-grid tiny house hamlet A few years ago, a group of carpenters (and friends) began building tiny homes on a property in southwest France using material from the woods, tools from the past (and present) and the freedom afforded by relying on their own labor. Today the forested land looks straight out of a fairy tale. There’s a tiny mud house with a living roof, a handcrafted caravan home perched above wagon wheels, a wood-heated bathtub (and a jacuzzi run off timber scraps), a bicycled-powered wood carving machine, an earthen bread/pizza oven, an underground wine and cheese cellar (AKA the “hobbit-iere”), experimental gardens and a chicken coop treehouse.

Treehouse / RPA Architects: RPA Location: Nichols Canyon, Los Angeles, CA, USA Project Area: 16 sqm Project Year: 2009

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