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Guy travels the world and shoots one second of footage in each location

Guy travels the world and shoots one second of footage in each location

http://www.wimp.com/travelsworld/

Anamorphic Graffiti French collective Paper Donut has painted a series of walls with three-dimensional shapes. (Above) The image is part of an ad campaign for fashion store Sqwear, and the other two visuals are personal projects. See also: “Are you ready for a paper breakfast?” Photos © Paper Donut Link via Unurth Olympic National Park: One of the wildest places left in the USA [36 PICS] Maple Glade Trail. It’s supposed to be a humbling experience to stand amidst such giants in the ancient forests of Olympic National Park. Photo #1 by rachel_thecat Maples in Olympic National Park’s Hoh Rain Forest. 95% of this national park is designated as wilderness, a paradise for backpackers and hikers.

A Point of View: The British and their bizarre view of Americans We lap up their culture, adopt their economics and are obsessed with the "special relationship". So why do British people have such a confused - even negative - view of Americans, asks writer Will Self. In 1976 my American mother took me to see Tom Stoppard's two short plays, Dirty Linen and New-Found-Land. The former was a rather prescient - or possibly only perennial - farce about libidinous politicos and a prurient press. The latter - which, in an act of dramatic tmesis was inserted between the two halves of Dirty Linen - was a brief two-hander the playwright had penned in support of his friend Ed Berman, a theatrical impresario and community activist who, at the time, was having difficulties with his British residency. (Yes, strange to relate, there was a time when Americans were viewed by the Home Office as dangerously radical.)

New camera promises to capture your whole life - tech - 16 October 2009 A camera you can wear as a pendant to record every moment of your life will soon be launched by a UK-based firm. Originally invented to help jog the memories of people with Alzheimer's disease, it might one day be used by consumers to create "lifelogs" that archive their entire lives. Worn on a cord around the neck, the camera takes pictures automatically as often as once every 30 seconds. It also uses an accelerometer and light sensors to snap an image when a person enters a new environment, and an infrared sensor to take one when it detects the body heat of a person in front of the wearer. It can fit 30,000 images onto its 1-gigabyte memory.

The Mind-Blowing Mount Roraima Mount Roraima is the highest of the Pakaraima mountain chain in South America and one of the world’s most extraordinary natural geological formations. The 31 square kilometer summit area of Mount Roraima is defined by 400 meter tall cliffs on all sides and includes the borders of Brazil, Venezuela, and Guyana. The tabletop mountains of the Pakaraima’s are considered some of the oldest geological formations on Earth, dating back to over two billion years ago. The result is the staggering landscape of Mount Rariama which we tour below in photographs and video:

Potential superpowers The United States as the current superpower[1][2] and other political entities with the potential to become superpowers in the 21st century. China[edit] Barry Buzan asserted in 2004 that "China certainly presents the most promising all-round profile" of a potential superpower.[22] Buzan claimed that "China is currently the most fashionable potential superpower and the one whose degree of alienation from the dominant international society makes it the most obvious political challenger." However, he noted this challenge is constrained by the major challenges of development and by the fact that its rise could trigger a counter coalition of states in Asia. Parag Khanna stated in 2008 that by making massive trade and investment deals with Latin America and Africa, China had established its presence as a superpower along with the European Union and the United States.

Vicon Revue Introducing the next generation Revue. Revue 3MP has four times more storage and a 3 megapixel sensor. For detailed product information including new features, example images and a downloadable brochure click here . Plitvice Lakes National Park, Croatia The stunning Plitvice Lakes National Park lies in the Lika region of Croatia. The park is surrounded by the mountains Plješevica, Mala Kapela, and Medveđak, which are part of the Dinaric Alps. The 16 blue-green Plitvice Lakes, which are separated by natural dams of travertine, are situated on the Plitvice plateau. Waterfalls connect the lakes, and the tallest waterfall is Veliki Slap at 70 meters (230 feet) tall. The Plitvice lakes area boasts a large variety of interesting and colorful flora and fauna.

International Human Development Indicators - UNDP You're missing out! This site's interactive maps and charts require a modern browser. For the best experience, please visit this site using Chrome, Firefox, or Internet Explorer 9 or above. International Human Development Indicators Japanese Museum Unveils A Giant Globe Made of 10,000 Live-Updating OLED Panels Geo-Cosmos If you want to see what Earth looks like from space, become an astronaut (or, barring that, a space tourist). For the next best view, pay a visit to Tokyo’s National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation where a massive, nearly 20-foot spherical OLED orb--the world’s first large scale spherical OLED --offers a satellite’s-eye view of the planet in super high resolution. “Geo-Cosmos” is made up of 10,362 OLED panels that display continuously-updating satellite footage of our tiny blue marble, representing what our planet looks like from space in something close to realtime. It replaces an earlier model covered in LED panels, offering museum-goers a full 10 million pixels, a resolution 10 times greater than its predecessor.

Lofted Forest Home: Organic Curves & Natural Materials Good things come to those who wait – particularly in a work of uniquely detailed and highly curved architecture. Nearly a decade in the making, this structure by Robert Harvey Oshatz is much like a tree house – lofted toward the top of the canopy around it – only bigger, grander, more complex and curved than most any tree house in the world. The perimeter of the structure is pushed out into the forest around it, curving in and out to create views as well as a sense of intimacy with the coniferous and deciduous tree cover.

List of buildings with 100 floors or more This is a list of buildings with 100 floors or more. Completed buildings[edit] This list includes buildings whose construction is complete, or are topped-out. Buildings under construction[edit] This is a list of buildings under construction that are planned to have 100 floors or more.

SWITL scoops oozy goop with amazing robotic precision (video) Look, sometimes, not often, but sometimes we'll miss a truly spectacular and mind bending story that requires a double-back. The SWITL robotic hand is just such a case. The patent-pending technology looks to have been revealed on video back in late October showing the Furukawa Kikou robot deftly lifting a ketchup and mayonnaise mess from a table and then replacing it unchanged from its original shape. The tech was developed for bakeries with the intention of automating the handling of soft substances that were either too malleable or too icky for human hands.

'Ultraconserved Words' Have Persisted Since Ice Age By Elizabeth Norton If you've ever cringed when your parents said "groovy," you'll know that spoken language can have a brief shelf life. But frequently used words can persist for generations, even millennia, and similar sounds and meanings often turn up in very different languages. The existence of these shared words, or cognates, has led some linguists to suggest that seemingly unrelated language families can be traced back to a common ancestor. Now, a new statistical approach suggests that peoples from Alaska to Europe may share a linguistic forebear dating as far back as the end of the Ice Age, about 15,000 years ago.

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