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The Lesser Key of Solomon

The Lesser Key of Solomon
The Lesser Key of Solomon, also known as the Clavicula Salomonis Regis[note 1] or Lemegeton, is an anonymous grimoire (or spell book) focused on demonology. It was compiled in the mid-seventeenth century, mostly from materials a couple of centuries older.[1][2] It is divided into five books, the Ars Goetia, the Ars Theurgia-Goetia, the Ars Paulina, the Ars Almadel, and the Ars Notoria.[1][3] Ars Goetia[edit] The most obvious source for the Ars Goetia is Johann Weyer's Pseudomonarchia Daemonum in his De praestigiis daemonum. Weyer does not cite, and is unaware of, any other books in the Lemegeton, indicating that the Lemegeton was derived from his work, not the other way around.[1][4] The order of the spirits was changed between the two, four additional spirits were added to the later work, and one spirit (Pruflas) was omitted. In a slightly later copy made by Dr. This portion of the work was later translated by S.L. The Seventy-Two Demons[edit] Ars Theurgia Goetia[edit] Ars Paulina[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Lesser_Key_of_Solomon

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Holy Guardian Angel The term Holy Guardian Angel was possibly coined either by Abraham of Worms, a German Cabalist who wrote a book on ceremonial magick during the 15th century or Samuel Liddell MacGregor Mathers, the founder of the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn, who later translated this manuscript and elaborated on this earlier work, giving it extensive magical notes, but the original concept goes back to the Zoroastrian Arda Fravaš ('Holy Guardian Angels').[citation needed] In Mathers' publication of The Book of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage, he writes: "If thou shalt perfectly observe these rules, all the following Symbols and an infinitude of others will be granted unto thee by thy Holy Guardian Angel; thou thus living for the Honour and Glory of the True and only God, for thine own good, and that of thy neighbour. Let the Fear of God be ever before the eyes and the heart of him who shall possess this Divine Wisdom and Sacred Magic

Emerald Tablet An imaginative 17th century depiction of the Emerald Tablet from the work of Heinrich Khunrath, 1606. The Emerald Tablet, also known as the Smaragdine Table, or Tabula Smaragdina, is a compact and cryptic piece of Hermetica reputed to contain the secret of the prima materia and its transmutation. It was highly regarded by European alchemists as the foundation of their art and its Hermetic tradition. The original source of the Emerald Tablet is unknown. Although Hermes Trismegistus is the author named in the text, its first known appearance is in a book written in Arabic between the sixth and eighth centuries. The text was first translated into Latin in the twelfth century. Classification of demons There have been various demonologies (classifications of demons) in Christian demonology and classical occultism and Renaissance magic. Classification systems are based on the nature of the demon, the sin with which they tempt people, the month in which their power was strongest, the saints that were their adversaries, or other characteristics. Classification by domain[edit]

The Egyptian Book of the Dead Index Sacred Texts Egypt The Papyrus of Ani by Introduction Translation Because of the substantial amount of hieroglypics interspersed in the original text, I have omitted the ### 'glyph' placeholder where context permits, for readability. Only actual illustations have been inserted into the file. Barbatos His name derives from Latin barbatus, meaning "bearded, old man, philosopher". He is the 8th demon in The Lesser Key of Solomon, while Pseudomonarchia Daemonum lists him as the 6th demon. He is also mentioned in Grand Grimoire as subordinate of Satanachia.[1] See also[edit]

Abraxas Abraxas (Gk. ΑΒΡΑΣΑΞ, which is far more common in the sources than the variant form Abraxas, ΑΒΡΑΞΑΣ)[citation needed] was a word of mystic meaning in the system of the Gnostic Basilides, being there applied to the “Great Archon” (Gk., megas archōn), the princeps of the 365 spheres (Gk., ouranoi).[1] The seven letters spelling its name may represent each of the seven classic planets—Sun, Moon, Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn.[2] There are similarities and differences between such figures in reports about Basilides's teaching, ancient Gnostic texts, the larger Greco-Roman magical traditions, and modern magical and esoteric writings. Opinions abound on Abraxas, who in recent centuries has been claimed to be both an Egyptian god and a demon.[3] The Swiss Psychologist Carl Jung wrote a short Gnostic treatise in 1916 called The Seven Sermons to the Dead, which called Abraxas a god higher than the Christian God and devil that combines all opposites into one being. Sources[edit]

Theistic Satanism The history of theistic Satanism, and assessments of its existence and prevalence in history, is obscured by it having been grounds for execution at some times in the past, and due to people having been accused of it who did not consider themselves to worship Satan, such as in the witch trials in Early Modern Europe. Most of theistic Satanism exists in relatively new models and ideologies, and many claiming to not be involved with Christianity at all.[4][5][6] Possible history of theistic Satanism[edit] The worship of Satan was a frequent charge against those charged in the witch trials in Early Modern Europe and other witch-hunts such as the Salem witch trials. Satanism and crime[edit] John Allee, founder of the First Church of Satan,[28] equates some of the “violent fringe” of Satanism as “Devil worshipers” and “reverse Christians”.

Dark Ages From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Dark Ages may refer to: In history and sociology[edit] In astrophysics[edit]

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