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Data Visualized: More on Teaching With Infographics

Data Visualized: More on Teaching With Infographics
A BBC documentary featured Dr. Hans Rosling, a founder of Gapminder, which uses data animation to educate the public about gaps in health and wealth. Go to related article » “In an uncharted world of boundless data, information designers are our new navigators,” begins a recent Times article, “When the Data Struts Its Stuff.” Last summer we did a popular series of posts on classroom uses for data visualization — the graphs, charts, timelines, diagrams, flowcharts, interactive slide shows and maps also called “infographics.” You can find all five posts linked from the first one, “Teaching With Infographics | Places to Start.” Today we add to our collection with some new resources inspired by this latest Times article. Key Questions What are the purposes of visual displays like the charts, maps, graphs, timelines, tables and other features known as “infographics”? Teaching About the Creation and Interpretation of Infographics Why Visualize Data? How Do They Do It? Cool Infographics Flowing Data

http://learning.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/04/08/data-visualized-more-on-teaching-with-infographics/

Infographics Explained and How to Use Them In Your Classroom What Are Infographics? I found many definitions of what Infographics are as well as explanations of how they are useful in a variety of settings. Here are a couple of the definitions I liked followed by their sources:Information graphics or infographics are graphic visual representations of information, data or knowledge. These graphics present complex information quickly and clearly, such as in signs, maps, journalism, technical writing, and education.

Reality TV and E-Learning: The Next Frontier? Three Possible Edu-Reality Shows You don't want to watch, but once you do, you want more and more. You ask yourself why, and all you can come up with is that there is something cathartic about tragedy (not exactly a new finding -- but ranks up there with the eternal verities) -- and, the Aristotelian ideas / precepts still hold: the tragic hero is compelling because of the essentially flawed nature of his/her beingness, and hubris resides at the core. "There but for the grace of God ..." we intone because we all have a "hubris trigger" in our heart of hearts -- we all would love to be invincible and to somehow transcend / escape angst, pain, fear of death, and death itself.

Everything You Own In A Photo: A Look At Our Worldly Possessions : The Picture Show Today on All Things Considered, photographer Peter Menzel and his wife, Faith D’Aluisio, discuss their latest book, What I Eat: Around the World in 80 Diets. But 16 years ago, Menzel was working on another project, called Material World: A Global Family Portrait. He and other photographers took portraits of 30 statistically average families with all of their worldly possessions displayed outside their homes. Hide caption The Ukita family in front of their home in Tokyo.

EdTech Cheat Sheet edtechdigest.com © 2010-2014 EdTech Digest. Skip to content ← Education Transformed Through IT (Intervention Technology) Critical Thinking On The Web Top Ten Argument Mapping Tutorials. Six online tutorials in argument mapping, a core requirement for advanced critical thinking.The Skeptic's Dictionary - over 400 definitions and essays. The Fallacy Files by Gary Curtis. Best website on fallacies. Butterflies and Wheels. Tomorrow’s College Will Be Free edtechdigest.com © 2010-2014 EdTech Digest. Skip to content The Election and Mobile: Dialing For Democratic Dollars [INFOGRAPHIC] During this year's U.S. election, candidates channeled the power of apps and text messaging to appeal to voters, promote their party platform and fundraise. CallerSmart analyzed how much telephones — smartphones, texts and anonymous phone banks — are bringing democracy to a digital environment. As it turns out, President Barack Obama or Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney could thank cellphones for being elected on Nov. 6. SEE ALSO: How Are Apps Shaping the 2012 Election? [INFOGRAPHIC]

What Is Intelligence? Just a Byproduct of Cooperation. What's the Latest Development? By developing computer simulations of neural networks that evolved over 50,000 generations, scientists at Trinity University have concluded that intelligence is an evolutionary byproduct of social teamwork. Each neural network, or 'brain', took part in two social dilemmas in which "two players must choose between cooperation and defection during repeated rounds. Upon completion of either game, each 'brain' produced 'offspring' with other 'brains' that made more advantageous choices during the games. ... After 50,000 generations, the model showed that as cooperation increased, so did the intelligence of the programmed brains." What's the Big Idea?

How To Create Outstanding Modern Infographics In this tutorial you will learn that data doesn't have to be boring, it can be beautiful! Learn how to use various graph tools, illustration techniques and typography to make an accurate and inspiring infographic in Adobe Illustrator. Start by using the Rectangle Tool (M) to draw a shape. Give it a subtle radial gradient too. The entire design is based on a grid of four columns. To make the columns first select the rectangle and drag a guide onto the centre of the shape.

Infographics: Real World Integration of Standards, Design and Informational Text Let’s face it. I have a problem. I’ve joined the obsessed and need to find some sort of Infographics Geeks Anonymous support group. I am totally fascinated with the amazing world of infographics. 20+ years ago when I was teaching high school social studies, I thought charts and graphs were good ways to help students understand complex topics. We Can't Teach Students to Love Reading - The Chronicle Review By Alan Jacobs While virtually anyone who wants to do so can train his or her brain to the habits of long-form reading, in any given culture, few people will want to. And that's to be expected. Serious "deep attention" reading has always been and will always be a minority pursuit, a fact that has been obscured in the past half-century, especially in the United States, by the dramatic increase in the percentage of the population attending college, and by the idea (only about 150 years old) that modern literature in vernacular languages should be taught at the university level. At the beginning of the 20th century, perhaps 2 percent of Americans attended a university; now the number is closer to 70 percent (though only about 30 percent get bachelor's degrees). The extreme reader, to coin a phrase, is a rare bird indeed.

Ed Tech Start Ups Group News Presentations and slideshows are great tools in education and learning. They do not only provide information in such a visually appealing way but also help learners remember what they have seen and read. One of the outstanding feature that slidewhows have is their brevity.

The Pleasures and Perils of Rereading In his often anthologized essay “On Reading Old Books,” William Hazlitt wrote, “I hate to read new books. There are twenty or thirty volumes that I have read over and over again, and these are the only ones that I have any desire to ever read at all.” This is a rather extreme position on rereading, but he is not alone. Larry McMurtry made a similar point: “If I once read for adventure, I now read for security. How nice to be able to return to what won’t change.

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