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Tortagialla.com - the creative journal of Artist Linda Tieu

Tortagialla.com - the creative journal of Artist Linda Tieu
The most common type of sewn bookbinding that I often default to, falls into the category of longstitch binding. It’s really a general categorization for many different methods of sewn binding. People have invented their own patterns and techniques and have probably called it something else as well. Suffice to say, it’s a general way to denote sewing your paper to the cover of your book. I’m sure you’ve noticed journals out there with exposed sewing in the binding in a variety of patterns and designs. The materials for this project include leather, paper, thread, needle, an awl and cutting device of some sort. Regarding the thread, I’m using a natural linen thread in this example, but you can also use waxed thread sold specifically for bookbinding to prevent knotting up when sewing. Regarding my little awl, I use it to punch holes in the paper. Let me first explain how I made my leather cover, although you can do this with any other type of material. Pretty cool, huh? Related Posts: Related:  craft

Bookbinding Techniques « jimmiekat During my portfolio class at Parsons this morning, I asked my teacher, Will van Roden, what he thought about including process into our portfolios, such as inspiration, thumbnail sketches, roughs, and so on. He replied that he thought it could be nice as a separate process book—not included in the regular portfolio but as an interesting separate design piece, with thumbnails in a nicely gridded layout, examples placed in in an interesting way, and so on—a well-designed book project in its own right. This got me thinking about another book-binding project, and I started doing a little research. Above: Cord binding / Below: Caterpillar Stitch Both photographs by SlateBlu And here is a video demonstration of how to make a caterpillar stitch. Have a great weekend, everyone! Like this: Like Loading...

KNOW AND TELL CRAFTS: DIY LIGHT BOX! I have been working on my photography and to all the other bloggers out there, I want to help! Don't spend hundreds of dollars buying "professional light boxes" when you can make your own practically for free! Here is how you make a simple light box, in only 5 steps to get "picture perfect" pics!( Click to enlarge) 1.Get a box, preferably square and is sturdy! 2.Cut squares out of the top, left, and right sides. 3.Get about 3ft. of light meshy white fabric and cover the sides you cut out. 4.Cut white foam board to fit inside of the box, there will be a small crease but it really isn't noticeable. 5.Get a nice light or lamp and light over the top of the box, the fabric acts as a filter, evening the light out. Here are the pictures I got with my new light box: My nicely oversized watch :). Some letter beads, I had laying around. And my header (a little different), that I made with the crystal clear white background, using scrabble tiles. My elephant:) I <3 Scrabble tiles. And to finish, LOVE...

A Beautiful Mess: SCRAPBOOK I always stumble upon beautiful handkerchiefs at antique malls, but with no practical use for them I usually pass them by. But today I will be sharing how to turn those pretty hankies into a photo-a-day journal. This is a great project to commemorate the last of your summer days! You could an instant camera or print off Instagram photos! You'll Need: Vintage handkerchief, sewing machine, book pages or other paper, embroidery thread, letter stickers, Instant photos or other printed photographs. 1. Now fill up your pages with a photo-a-day project. I decided to keep my book simple and date each photo with a White Dymo pen underneath each photo. The Nation slateblu: book binding Last Saturday, when the kiddies went to the snow with their daddy, I had lunch with friends, who used to be colleagues at work. My friend Daisy is a very good cook so we had a homemade 4 course meal with extras to bring home. It was a great afternoon. I made handbound books for my two friends...and one soon to be finished for myself to write down photo notes for my picture files. The necessary supplies... Slate gray linen thread... Books... This one's waiting to be finished... Wrapped up with my new favorite bow and ready to go...

Better than Tiffanys Have some spare time? Feeling crafty? Check out this old school way to make ring I just HAD to try! Here is a simple ring that is MADE from money. So how bout changing this: Yep, I did it! I saw rings like this on etsy, and thought “how did they do that!” Ready? Find a quarter, or similar looking foreign coin (I used a 10 pence because I couldnt find a good quarter). Got your quarter? Grab a hammer. Back in the day, I’ve heard they used to use spoons for this part, and tapped instead of hammered…but I cannot even IMAGINE how long that would take. Anyway, you want to hammer the edges. Just keep hammering, and spinning it in a circle. Yes your hands will get black. Next, you will want a drill. Anyway, keep moving up sizes of drill bits until you get too close to the edge. If you have a dremel, or a sander type bit for your drill…USE IT. Now file it down until you’ve got the ring size you are looking for! How much fun right?!

Tacket binding - CaiLun.info - Artist Books Paper & Bookbinding Blog - Cai Lun - Dennis Yuen I have always loved tacket binding, because its sasuage-like packing on the spine is so cute. I have just finished one for my co-worker's boyfriend, Todd, and I think I might have perfected my tacket binding skill so it's about time to share it as much as possible. I have been devising my own tacket binding method, as I haven't actually seen one physically to deconstruct and examine its construction. Pierce 4 holes for every single tacket pattern. Each section is stitched individually with 1 single thread. Pull the thread out from A2 to the outside and you're ready to create the tacket pattern on the top "backbone". Pull the thread out from B2 to the outside to beging packing the lower pattern. A few tips on wrapping: At the end I attached a bright red ribbon to finish the book, however, it didn't work for me so I decided against it and switched to another one, which I will post next.

Stack Overflow Medieval Carolingian Bookbinding

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