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A responsive CSS grid system helping desktop and mobile browsers play nicely together.

A responsive CSS grid system helping desktop and mobile browsers play nicely together.
Columnal CSS Classes .container (In common with cssgrid.net) The container is the full page width and allows a background behind column content. It is the highest element of the grid system and contains the other main elements, .row and columns. There's no set way to use .container, it can be the entire web page, or a page could be used to separate a site into separate containers of content. .row

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Related:  ergonomie prototypageGrid systems

Less Framework 4 I called Less Framework "a CSS grid system for designing adaptive websites". It was basically a fixed-width grid that adapted to a couple of then popular screen widths by shedding some of its columns. It also had matching typographic presets to go with it, built with a modular scale based on the golden ratio. The resources it was originally published with are still available on GitHub. Contrary to how most CSS frameworks work, Less Framework simply provided a set of code comments and visual templates, instead of having predefined classes to control the layout with.

Golden Grid System GGS was my next step after Less Framework. Instead of a fixed-width grid, it used a fully fluid-width one, without even a maximum width. The resources it was published with are still available on GitHub. The idea was to take a 18-column grid, use the outermost columns as margins, and use the remaining 16 to lay elements out.

Gridlock  /  Projects  /  Ben Plum Syntax Gridlock features three distinct grid sizes that correspond to specific screen sizes: desktop, tablet and mobile. Desktop features a full 12 or 16 column grid, tablet snaps down to 6 or 8, and mobile contains only 3. The syntax is simple and easily read: [target device]-[column count]. Using this method, a cell can be easily adjusted to fit the target device's screen size by applying the appropriate class names: desktop-8 tablet-4 mobile-3. Gridlock also includes some fraction helper classes, -full, -half and -third. A Simple CSS Framework Toast is a CSS framework made as simple as it can be, but no simpler. A plain-English responsive grid makes simple layouts a breeze, and with box-sizing you can add padding and borders to the grid, without breaking a single thing. .unit.one-of-four .unit.one-of-three

A Simple CSS Framework Toast is a CSS framework made as simple as it can be, but no simpler. A plain-English responsive grid makes simple layouts a breeze, and with box-sizing you can add padding and borders to the grid, without breaking a single thing. .unit.one-of-four .unit.one-of-three .unit.two-of-three .unit.one-of-two How To Choose The Right Grid It’s easy enough to understand how grids are helpful in organizing your content. Not as easy is deciding what type of grid best suits your content and how to build it. Here’s how I made decisions about what grid to use for the redesign of this site. You may remember in redesign this site I created documents filled with design decisions that later became an online style guide. Last week I walked through the decisions in my typographic document.

Sass: CSS Pre-Processsor Before you can use Sass, you need to set it up on your project. If you want to just browse here, go ahead, but we recommend you go install Sass first. Go here if you want to learn how to get everything setup. Rolling Your Own Grid Layouts on the Fly Without a Framework Do you hate CSS grid frameworks but love the rapid layout benefits that they provide? Do you struggle with the math and code necessary to create your own flexible multi-column layouts on the fly? Today we’re going to walk you through creating your own basic, reusable system for creating multiple columns that you can implement anywhere any time with only a few lines of code. No bloated code or non-sematic class names required!

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