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EFSA 28/01/10 L’EFSA et l’ECDC présentent leur rapport sur les zoonoses et les épidémies d’origine alimentaire dans l’Union euro

EFSA 28/01/10 L’EFSA et l’ECDC présentent leur rapport sur les zoonoses et les épidémies d’origine alimentaire dans l’Union euro
EFSA Journal; 2010 8(1):1496 [410 pp.]. doi:10.2903/j.efsa.2010.1496 Type: Scientific Report of EFSA Question number: EFSA-Q-2009-00695 Approved: 23 December 2009 Published: 28 January 2010 Last updated: 30 July 2010. This version replaces the previous one/s. Affiliation: European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), Parma, Italy This scientific output, published 26 April 2010, replaces the earlier version published on 28 January 2010. Zoonoses are infections and diseases that are naturally transmissible directly or indirectly, for example via contaminated foodstuffs, between animals and humans. In 2008, 27 Member States submitted information on the occurrence of zoonoses, zoonotic agents and food-borne outbreaks to the European Commission and the European Food Safety Authority. In 2008, salmonellosis was again the second most often reported zoonotic disease in humans accounting for 131,468 confirmed human cases. An important decline in the prevalence of S. Related:  Epidémiologie humaine en Campylobacter en EuropeRage en EuropeRéférences EFSA et Parlement Européen concernant Listeria

EFSA 17/03/10 Analysis of the baseline survey on the prevalence of Campylobacter in broiler batches and of Campylobacter and Sal EFSA Journal 2010; 8(03):1503 [100 pp.]. doi:10.2903/j.efsa.2010.1503 Type: Scientific Report of EFSA On request from: European Commission Question number: EFSA-Q-2008-416A Approved: 31 January 2010 Published: 17 March 2010 Last updated: 16 September 2011. This version replaces the previous one/s. Affiliation: European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), Parma, Italy A European Union-wide baseline survey on Campylobacter in broiler batches and on Campylobacter and Salmonella on broiler carcasses was carried out in 2008. A total of 10,132 broiler batches were sampled from 561 slaughterhouses in 26 European Union Member States and two countries not belonging to the European Union. © European Food Safety Authority, 2010 In the European Union, campylobacteriosis and salmonellosis are the two most frequently reported food-borne illnesses in humans. Sampling took place between January and December 2008. The counts of Campylobacter bacteria on broiler carcasses varied also widely between countries.

Animal Health & Welfare - Animal Diseases - Eradication and Monitoring Programmes - Legislation [Expand All] Submission of eradication and control programmes Standard requirements for applications are listed in the Annexes - Decision 2008/425/EC, amended by Decision 2012/282/EC Standard format: Annex 1 Bovine tuberculosis; Bovine brucellosis; Ovine and caprine brucellosis; Bluetongue; Classical swine fever; African swine fever; Swine vesicular disease; Rabies Annex 2 Salmonellosis Annex 3 Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopaties (TSEs) Annex 4 Avian Influenza Approval Every year, the Commission draws a list of the programmes that qualify for co-financing in a decision with the proposed amount for each. Reporting For each programme, EU countries submit: Intermediate technical and financial reports; By 30 April each year, an annual technical report assessing the results and expenditure of the previous year. Reporting requirements - Decision 2008/940/EC The Commission evaluates annually if its funds are used adequately. Task force Subgroups Bovine tuberculosis subgroup Report - Spain, October 2012

EFSA DEC 2007 Rapport annuel de l’EFSA-ECDC sur les infections transmissibles de l’animal à l’homme. Communiqué de presse 19 décembre 2007 L’Autorité européenne de sécurité des aliments (EFSA) et le Centre européen de prévention et de contrôle des maladies (ECDC) ont publié leur rapport annuel communautaire conjoint sur les maladies infectieuses transmissibles de l’animal à l’homme (maladies zoonotiques) qui, chaque année, touchent plus de 350 000 personnes dans l’Union européenne. Ce rapport indique que, tandis que le nombre d’infections à Salmonella chez l’homme est toujours en baisse, les infections à Listeria, qui peuvent s’avérer très dangereuses chez les femmes enceintes et entraînent un taux de mortalité élevé, connaissent une recrudescence. Les infections à Campylobacter figurent encore en tête de liste des zoonoses signalées chez l’homme. La résistance de la bactérie Campylobacter tant chez l’homme que chez l’animal à un médicament antimicrobien couramment utilisé, la ciprofloxacine, atteint des niveaux élevés et devient inquiétante selon ce rapport.

EFSA 04/06/09 Proposed technical specifications for a survey on Listeria monocytogenes in selected categories of ready-to-eat fo Type: Scientific Report of EFSA Question number: EFSA-Q-2008-415 Approved: 22 May 2009 Published: 04 June 2009 The European Food Safety Authority and its Task Force on Zoonoses Data Collection were requested by the European Commission to produce a proposal for technical specifications on a co-ordinated monitoring programme (a survey scheme) for Listeria monocytogenes in ready-to-eat (RTE) food. This survey should allow the comparison of L. monocytogenes contamination in RTE food in the Community and Member States and the verification of the Community food safety criteria for L. monocytogenes. The proposed technical specifications focus on sampling those categories of RTE food in which the highest rates of L. monocytogenes contamination have been observed in the European Union (EU): soft and semi-soft cheeses, smoked and gravad fish, and heat-treated meat products that are handled after heat treatment. Two alternatives for an EU wide survey on L. monocytogenes in RTE food are proposed.

EFSA 28/01/10 EFSA confirms chicken meat major source of human cases of campylobacteriosis EFSA Journal 2010; 8(1):1437 [89 pp.]. doi:10.2903/j.efsa.2010.1437 Type: Opinion of the Scientific Committee/Scientific Panel On request from: European Commission Question number: EFSA-Q-2008-469 Adopted: 09 December 2009 Published: 28 January 2010 Affiliation: European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), Parma, Italy This scientific opinion further elaborates a previous EFSA opinion and assesses the extent to which meat derived from broilers contributes to human campylobacteriosis at EU level. It gives an overview of the public health significance and burden of campylobacteriosis, concluding that there is considerable underascertainment and underreporting of clinical campylobacteriosis in the EU. The known and hypothesised factors having an impact of the epidemiology of human campylobacteriosis are summarised. © European Food Safety Authority, 2010 The current scientific opinion gives an overview on the public health significance and burden of campylobacteriosis.

Animal Health & Welfare - Animal Diseases - Eradication and Monitoring Programmes - Legislation requires javascript 7 and 8 December 2006 in Helsinki, Finland - Finnish Food Safety Authority (Evira) The meeting was organised jointly by the Finnish presidency and the Commission. The main objective was to exchange information in order to strengthen the cooperation and collaboration among Member States, Acceding States and the Russian Federation regarding the eradication of rabies. Previous steps included a working group meeting on "Rabies co-operation", held during the Informal CVO meeting in Vienna on 16-19 May 2006. Descriptive epidemiology Rabies eradication in the EU: an overview (Francisco Javier Reviriego Gordejo, COM) Co-financing rabies eradication in the EU (new 90/424) Experience on transboundary cooperation Principles in rabies eradication Challenges of new programme Rabies situation and oral vaccination of foxes in the Czech Republic Rabies situation in Austria in 2006 Involvement of stakeholders/hunters in rabies eradication Conclusions

IRB BARCELONA 07/10/09 IRB Barcelona to participate in a European project against tuberculosis IRB Barcelona to participate in a European project against tuberculosis Tuberculosis is one of the major health threats worldwide. Every year more than 2 million people die from this infectious disease, which is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The lack of effectiveness of drug treatments because of the appearance of strains that show multi-resistance to new drugs has made tuberculosis a focus of international research to define new therapeutic tools against this disease. 7 October 2009 The project NOstress (Unravelling the molecular mechanism of nitrosative stress resistance in tuberculosis), included in the health section of the 7th Framework Programme of the European Union and coordinated at international level by professor Javier Luque at the Dept. NOstress aims to identify the molecular bases of the nitrosative stress resistance shown by M. tuberculosis, that is to say, to the excessive formation of the free radical nitric oxide (NO).

EFSA 27/06/13 Analysis of the baseline survey on the prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in certain ready-to-eat foods in the E EFSA Journal 2013;11(6):3241 [75 pp.]. doi:10.2903/j.efsa.2013.3241 Type: Scientific Report of EFSA On request from: European Commission Question number: EFSA-Q-2011-00137 Approved: 27 May 2013 Published: 27 June 2013 Affiliation: European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), Parma, Italy A European Union-wide baseline survey on Listeria monocytogenes was carried out in 2010 and 2011 with the aim of estimating the European Union level prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in certain ready-to-eat foods at retail. A total of 3 053 batches of packaged (not frozen) hot or cold smoked or gravad fish, 3 530 packaged heat-treated meat products and 3 452 soft or semi-soft cheeses were sampled from 3 632 retail outlets in 26 European Union Member States and one country not belonging to the European Union. The fish batch samples were analysed on arrival at the laboratory as well as at the end of shelf-life, whereas the meat products and the cheese samples were analysed at the end of shelf-life.

EFSA 14/12/06 Campylobacteriosis overtakes salmonellosis as the most reported animal infection transmitted to humans in the EU Press Release 14 December 2006 The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) has today published its second annual Community report on infectious diseases transmissible from animals to humans (zoonotic diseases) which affect over 380,000 European Union (EU) citizens every year. In 2005, campylobacteriosis overtook salmonellosis as the most reported zoonotic disease in humans in the EU. The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) provided the data on human zoonoses cases and contributed in the analysis of human related data in the report. The second annual Community report (2005) on infectious diseases transmissible from animals to humans (zoonotic diseases) published today has highlighted campylobacteriosis as the most reported animal infection transmitted to humans in the EU. The report also provides data on important resistance rates to antibiotics in Campylobacter originating from farm animals and food of animal origin. Notes to editors:

EUROSURVEILLANCE 02/05/13 Au sommaire:Re-emergence of animal rabies in northern Greece and subsequent human exposure, October 20 Greece has been rabies-free since 1987 with no human cases since 1970. During 2012 to 2013, rabies has re-emerged in wild and domestic animals in northern Greece. By end March 2013, rabies was diagnosed in 17 animals including 14 red foxes, two shepherd dogs and one cat; 104 subsequent human exposures required post-exposure prophylaxis according to the World Health Organization criteria. Human exposures occurred within 50 km radius of a confirmed rabies case in a wild or domestic animal, and most frequently stray dogs were involved. Introduction The last animal rabies case in Greece, dates back to 1987 while the last human case was reported in 1970 [1]. Rabid fox On 15 October 15 2012, a red fox (Vulpes vulpes) exhibited aggressive behavior during daytime, threatening inhabitants of a west Macedonian village in the area of Kozani. Rabid shepherd dog and exposure of humans and domestic animals Testing of brain samples from one exposed dog gave negative results. Figure. Table. Box.

EUROSURVEILLANCE 23/03/17 Ending tuberculosis in risk groups in Europe: challenges from travel and population movement C Jackson 1 , I Abubakar 1 + Author affiliations Citation style for this article: Jackson C, Abubakar I. Received:10 March 2017; Accepted:23 March 2017 As many countries in Europe make progress in tuberculosis (TB) control, TB incidence in Europe is diverse; in low-incidence countries (those with an incidence less than 20 per 100,000 [1]) the TB burden is increasingly borne by specific risk groups, such as migrants from high- to lower-incidence countries, persons with social risk factors such as homelessness and individuals who have been in contact with a TB patient. Migrants are considered to be at high risk of TB, for reasons such as the possibility of reactivation of latent infection acquired in their home country, frequent travel to high-incidence areas, and perhaps transmission within migrant communities in the receiving countries [8]. Arguably more controversial than screening migrants is the issue of screening individuals exposed to patients with active TB on board aircraft.

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