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Trace Your Ancestry with DNA - DNA Ancestry Project

Trace Your Ancestry with DNA - DNA Ancestry Project
Related:  Human DNA

Scientist Prove DNA Can Be Reprogrammed by Words and Frequencies By Grazyna Fosar and Franz Bludorf www.ryze.com/view.php?who=vitaeb THE HUMAN DNA IS A BIOLOGICAL INTERNET and superior in many aspects to the artificial one. Russian scientific research directly or indirectly explains phenomena such as clairvoyance, intuition, spontaneous and remote acts of healing, self healing, affirmation techniques, unusual light/auras around people (namely spiritual masters), mind’s influence on weather patterns and much more. In addition, there is evidence for a whole new type of medicine in which DNA can be influenced and reprogrammed by words and frequencies WITHOUT cutting out and replacing single genes. Only 10% of our DNA is being used for building proteins. The Russian biophysicist and molecular biologist Pjotr Garjajev and his colleagues also explored the vibrational behavior of the DNA. One can simply use words and sentences of the human language! But the higher developed an individual’s consciousness is, the less need is there for any type of device!

Tracing Your Ancestry Advances in DNA testing are allowing people to uncover information about their genetic ancestry and find out where some of their ancestors came from. As an African American, I don’t know where my African ancestors originated from. The only geographic location I can point to as my ancestral home is Tennessee. So I’m fascinated by the potential knowledge I could gain from this new generation of tests for genetic ancestry. But before I fork over more than $200 for such a test, the skeptic in me needs some answers. What can a DNA test really tell me about where I come from? Companies that offer genetic testing services for finding out about ancestry use several different testing methods. Taking these tests is straightforward. But these methods have a drawback. Another strategy for ancestry tracking is admixture testing. In both lineage and admixture testing, the larger the databases used to compare with a client’s DNA, the more accurate the results are likely to be.

Computers Made Out of DNA, Slime and Other Strange Stuff | Wired Science Everybody knows a computer is a machine made of metal and plastic, with microchip cores turning streams of electrons into digital reality. A century from now, though, computers could look quite different. They might be made from neurons and chemical baths, from bacterial colonies and pure light, unrecognizable to our old-fashioned 21st century eyes. Far-fetched? A little bit. But a computer is just a tool for manipulating information. Images: 1) CERN 2) Martinez et al.

Online Resources and Genealogical Tools to Find Your Roots Online databases make it easier than ever to trace your own family history, and DNA testing allows for the type of deep research conducted for Finding Your Roots with Henry Louis Gates, Jr. These links can help you get started. Trace Your Family History 23andMe Offers DNA testing and resources to learn ancestry and personal health information 248 Ancestors Dedicated to the research and discovery of Jewish ancestors African Ancestry Offers DNA testing with a focus on tracing the ancestry of people of African descent back to the present-day African country of origin DNA Heritage Information on DNA genealogy Ellis Island Search for relatives who may have come through Ellis Island FamilySearch Provides resources and is tied to real-world family history classes and Family History Centers around the world Family Tree DNA Offers DNA testing for the purpose of determining ancestral pedigrees Family Tree Maker Social network-oriented family tree sharing site Interment Cemetery records online

Scientist Prove DNA Can Be Reprogrammed by Words and Frequencies By Grazyna Fosar and Franz Bludorf THE HUMAN DNA IS A BIOLOGICAL INTERNET and superior in many aspects to the artificial one. Russian scientific research directly or indirectly explains phenomena such as clairvoyance, intuition, spontaneous and remote acts of healing, self healing, affirmation techniques, unusual light/auras around people (namely spiritual masters), mind’s influence on weather patterns and much more. In addition, there is evidence for a whole new type of medicine in which DNA can be influenced and reprogrammed by words and frequencies WITHOUT cutting out and replacing single genes. Only 10% of our DNA is being used for building proteins. It is this subset of DNA that is of interest to western researchers and is being examined and categorized. The Russian biophysicist and molecular biologist Pjotr Garjajev and his colleagues also explored the vibrational behavior of the DNA. One can simply use words and sentences of the human language! References:

DNA solves mysteries of ancient Ireland She’s a brown-eyed, brown-haired woman, with a face that would be right at home in the Mediterranean or the Middle East. And she’s Irish. She lived about 5200 years ago, and was buried near a stone monument and an ancient ring-shaped earthwork, in Ballynahatty, near Belfast. It was her people who built nearly all those megalithic tombs, monuments and stone circles, that you see in advertisements from the Irish tourism industry. And it’s now being suggested that nearly everyone in Ireland at that time looked like Maria, like they were from the Mediterranean. The genetic profile of these first Irish farmers indisputably originates in the Middle East. Maria lived a stone-age existence. Her ancestors may have taken a few centuries to complete the journey from the Middle East to the cold and foggy forests of northern Ireland. Maria’s DNA has traces of an even older first people in Ireland, people who relied on hunting and gathering for food. Let’s call them the Rathlin boys.

Scientist Proves DNA Can Be Reprogrammed by Words and Frequencies © Adam Scott Miller We came across this article today and thought that it would be a great read for our viewers. It’s awesome information showing the true nature of our reality and how science is changing everyday, opening up to the possibilities of this reality. “Scientist Prove DNA Can Be Reprogrammed by Words and Frequencies By Grazyna Fosar and Franz Bludorf THE HUMAN DNA IS A BIOLOGICAL INTERNET and superior in many aspects to the artificial one. Only 10% of our DNA is being used for building proteins. The Russian biophysicist and molecular biologist Pjotr Garjajev and his colleagues also explored the vibrational behavior of the DNA. One can simply use words and sentences of the human language! This finally and scientifically explains why affirmations, autogenous training, hypnosis and the like can have such strong effects on humans and their bodies. Garjajev’s research group succeeded in proving that with this method chromosomes damaged by x-rays for example can be repaired.

"Great Surprise"—Native Americans Have West Eurasian Origins Nearly one-third of Native American genes come from west Eurasian people linked to the Middle East and Europe, rather than entirely from East Asians as previously thought, according to a newly sequenced genome. Based on the arm bone of a 24,000-year-old Siberian youth, the research could uncover new origins for America's indigenous peoples, as well as stir up fresh debate on Native American identities, experts say. The study authors believe the new study could also help resolve some long-standing puzzles on the peopling of the New World, which include genetic oddities and archaeological inconsistencies. "These results were a great surprise to us," said study co-author and ancient-DNA specialist Eske Willerslev, of the University of Copenhagen, Denmark. "I hadn't expected anything like this. The arm bone of a three-year-old boy from the Mal'ta site near the shores of Lake Baikal in south-central Siberia (map) yielded what may be the oldest genome of modern humans ever sequenced.

A chimp-pig hybrid origin for humans? (Phys.org) —These days, getting a Ph.D. is probably the last thing you want to do if you are out to revolutionize the world. If, however, what you propose is an idea, rather than a technology, it can still be a valuable asset to have. Dr. Eugene McCarthy is a Ph.D. geneticist who has made a career out of studying hybridization in animals. He now curates a biological information website called Macroevolution.net where he has amassed an impressive body of evidence suggesting that human origins can be best explained by hybridization between pigs and chimpanzees. Generally speaking, interspecies hybrids—like mules, ligers (lion-tiger hybrids), or zedonks (zebra-donkey hybrids)—are less fertile than the parents that produced them. This latter possibility may not sound so far-fetched after you read the riveting details suggesting that the origin of the gorilla may be best explained by hybridization with the equally massive forest hog. Share Video undefined

DNA from ancient Phoenician stuns scientists A study of the first DNA obtained from an ancient Phoenician reveals that the man had European ancestry. The research team, which was co-led by Professor Lisa Matisoo-Smith of the University of Otago in New Zealand, sequenced the first complete mitochondrial genome of 2,500-year-old Phoenician buried in North Africa. Experts studied a man dubbed the “Young Man of Byrsa” or “Ariche,” whose remains were taken from a sarcophagus in the ancient city of Carthage, just outside Tunis, the Tunisian capital. Carthage was the center of the Phoenician civilization. Analysis shows that the man belonged to a rare European haplogroup – a genetic group with a common ancestor – indicating that his maternal ancestry is linked to locations on the North Mediterranean coast, probably on the Iberian Peninsula. Related: Archaeologists think they've found Aristotle's tomb Related: Scientists unearth 5,000-year-old Chinese beer recipe

A New Programming Language That Can Shape Our DNA Scientists have studied the behavior of complex biological molecules such as DNA for decades. Now they are moving to being able to control that behavior in test tubes and inside cells. Last month, a team led at the University of Washington announced they had devised and successfully tested a programming language that can guide the assembly of synthetic DNA molecules into a circuit that can perform a task, just as a software developer would write code to send commands to a computer. Chemists have always used mathematical models to study how molecules behave in mixtures. “Instead of thinking of this as a descriptive language that allows you to understand the chemistry, we said, we’re going to create a prescriptive language that allows you to program something,” says Georg Seelig, an assistant professor of electrical engineering and computer science at the school. A lot of work remains, but the broader field of synthetic biology is growing.

Paying a heavy price for loving the Neanderthals One of the biggest surprises about our evolution revealed over just the last decade is the extent to which our ancestors engaged in amorous congress with the evolutionary cousins. Bonking the Neanderthals, it seems, was a bit of a pastime for the distant relatives. It happened many times in Siberia, East Asia, the Middle East and Europe, and across a long period between 100,000 and 40,000 years ago. In reality, we have no idea of course exactly how many times it occurred, nor the circumstances in which it happened. Who instigated it, us or them? Now, the consequences of interbreeding for us today are becoming all too clear from studies of the genome - theirs and ours - ancient and modern. Somewhere between 1.5% and 2.1% of your genome was inherited from the Neanderthals, assuming your ancestry was non-African of course. East Asians typically have more Neanderthal DNA because their ancestors partook in a little more afternoon delight than the rest of ours did.

Key to Life is Information, Not Chemicals | Origin of Life Scientists trying to unravel the mystery of life's origins have been looking at it the wrong way, a new study argues. Instead of trying to recreate the chemical building blocks that gave rise to life 3.7 billion years ago, scientists should use key differences in the way that living creatures store and process information, suggests new research detailed today (Dec. 11) in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface. "In trying to explain how life came to exist, people have been fixated on a problem of chemistry, that bringing life into being is like baking a cake, that we have a set of ingredients and instructions to follow," said study co-author Paul Davies, a theoretical physicist and astrobiologist at Arizona State University. "That approach is failing to capture the essence of what life is about." Living systems are uniquely characterized by two-way flows of information, both from the bottom up and the top down in terms of complexity, the scientists write in the article.

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