background preloader


1) Translated by: Windowfarms Core Team. Welcome to the Instructions for MAMA! The Windowfarms Version 3.0 Modular Airlift Multicolumn Array (MAMA). Please make sure you have registered on, including having accepted the terms of service for participating in this open design community project. Registering will pass on to you a royalty-free license for you to use this community developed patent pending design for non-commercial purposes. Please use the Feedback button on the right to submit your ideas, questions, test results, and praise. ---------> Remember that this is an citizen technology project, so if you have an idea or an issue, research and develop it yourself (R&D-I-Y)! 2) Getting Started: Download and print the Windowfarms v3.0 parts list. 3) Section 1: Bottle Covering Each Windowfarm v3.0 column is made of 5 bottles: 4 plant bottles and 1 bottom reservoir bottle. 5) Fill an empty bottle with about 2"(5 cm) of water to weigh it down.

Related:  Mur vegetal culture petit formatWindow FarmingWindow farmwindow farm

Window Farms It all started when Britta Riley decided to build a mini-garden in a Brooklyn window, creating a low-maintenance and self-sufficient alternative to consuming. We’ve been fans of Window Farm‘s edible gardens for long while, and just in time for the holiday season the team has evolved their fantastic gardening systems to create a brand new stand-up version of their original microfarms. These mini-gardens can hang in columns or stand on the sill, allowing you to grow fresh vegetables, herbs, and leafy treats in practically any space. Britta Riley‘s vertical hydroponic Window Farm systems are a boon for space-starved urban dwellers looking to start their own garden. In their latest form the gardens are made from environmentally-friendly plastic and wire. The Window Farm team is featuring special offers through their Kickstarter page, and they even offer a varied selection of seedlings (at an extra cost) which can be shipped to your door.

TreeHugger © Philip Houiellebecq Rising food prices and a yearning for a bit of homegrown green may be some of the reasons why city dwellers turn to gardening. But for those who lack land to actually grow food on, do-it-yourself ideas like windowfarming can be a revelation -- especially when all you have is some window sill space. Aimed at those who are looking to try out windowfarming, but are reluctant about spending hours building their own system, British product designer Philip Houiellebecq's conceptual hydroponic growing system Auxano offers the ease of similar DIY windowfarms -- and without relying on electricity and the guesswork involved with other systems we've featured previously like Urbio. Made of recycled HDPE, steel and rubber, Auxano is designed as a slim, nested unit that can come apart easily, and can be arranged either vertically or horizontally. Plants and their roots are inserted into the removable top, which allows for easier harvesting.

Window Farms A Windowfarm is a vertical, indoor garden kit that allows for year-round growing in almost any window. It lets plants use natural window light, the climate control of your living space, and organic “liquid soil.” In the hydroponic system, nutrient-spiked water is pumped up from a reservoir at the base of the system and trickles down from bottle to bottle, bathing the roots along the way. Water and nutrients that are not absorbed collect in the reservoir and will be pumped through again at the next interval. It’s easy to use, you can grow lots of different plants, and it works without dirt — no mess! Introduction to Shelfponics A simple 3D animation to show relative size and layout of the bookshelf aquaponic vertical growing unit. Here is the complete shelfponics system. Click the image to see full size. Here is a picture of the space we decided to add vertical growing. The yellow bucket is where we placed the bookshelf system. Shelfponics, a term first coined here, is the Garden Pool team’s original invention and is available for purchase.

Spindow? Rotating Two-Face Window Plus Built-In Planter None of the ideas behind this is itself new, but the combination is a neat realization of multiple functions in one object for everyday home fenestration. First, yes, these are easier to clean than simple American-style, up-or-side-sliding windows, but the Europeans solved that problem some time ago with their dual-mode designs (which open at an angle for breezes while maintaining security, or rotate inward like doors depending on how you turn the handle). More interesting, perhaps, is the addition of a detachable planter that can take full advantage of being swung back indoors during adverse weather conditions (be it too much rain, or heat, or cold) then spun back outside just as easily. Of course, it can be left halfway open as well to catch breezes, but one does have to wonder about the safety of such an arrangement.

Windowfarms let you garden - appropriately enough - in your windows Whereas the majority of vertical farming concepts and projects featured in Gizmag over the years have either been huge dedicated structures or add-ons to existing buildings, the Windowfarms system downsizes and personalizes veggie growing by placing an indoor farm in the window. The original plastic-bottle-based, do-it-yourself hydroponics system design has been available for a while now but the developers are getting ready to make a new, improved kit version available. View all

Aquaponics 101 Part Three: System Design, Continued This is the third in a series of posts that are going to teach you most of what you need to know about Aquaponics. These posts are part of a book we are writing and will be selling on our website. So, if you’re curious about the most amazing food growing technology on the planet today, watch for this series of educational posts on Aquaponics and please, become interactive by making comments or asking questions.

Magnesium: This Invisible Deficiency Can Harm Your Health By Dr. Mercola Magnesium is a mineral used by every organ in your body, especially your heart, muscles, and kidneys.1 If you suffer from unexplained fatigue or weakness, abnormal heart rhythms or even muscle spasms and eye twitches, low levels of magnesium could be to blame. If you've recently had a blood test, you might assume it would show a magnesium deficiency. But only 1 percent of magnesium in your body is distributed in your blood, making a simple sample of magnesium from a serum magnesium blood test not very useful. Most magnesium is stored in your bones and organs, where it is used for many biological functions.

Aquaponics Explained – Part 2 Welcome back to the aquaponics revolution. In the last issue we talked about just what aquaponics is (the marriage of aquaculture and hydroponics) and how it works. I described system types and then went into some detail about the creatures that live in a media-based aquaponics system: fish, plants, bacteria, and worms. This article is the second installment in the two part series.

Related:  Gardening In Style, do it yourself, or with great products