background preloader

What is Slow Fashion?

What is Slow Fashion?
When a new concept like Slow Fashion comes around it is often hard to describe it. We find ourselves grasping for parallels like: ‘Slow Fashion is a sister movement to Slow Food’ or using comparisons like ‘Slow Fashion is the opposite of Fast Fashion’ or even clarify a little more like: “Slow Fashion ≠Anti Fashion” or “quality over quantity” — and while it is important to understand what Slow Fashion IS and is NOT is some sort of familiar term or phrase it isn’t enough to capture the essence of the movement. Rather than pigeonhole the entire movement into these little sound bites we need start to explore what Slow Fashion CAN be rather than what it CAN’T — Slow Fashion opens up a world of creative possibilities in personal fashion that chasing fast trends at the mall never will: Slow Fashion… …Celebrates Personal Style Slow Fashion embraces the idea of personal expression through your clothing. Related articles:

http://www.slowfashioned.com/archives/4909

Related:  politicsmaryac93

Topshop Gets Called Out For Unrealistic Mannequin Body Standards By now, it seems as if most retailers have been involved in some sort of controversy. And while some have been because of tasteless graphics, or hypersexualized advertisements, one thing we continue to see over and over again—and frankly, we're tired of it—is the ridiculous body standards reinforced by the mannequins that model the clothing. Topshop, the popular British brand that boasts collaborations with stars like Gigi Hadid and Cara Delevingne, has come under fire after a shopper noticed that the store's mannequin had extremely thin legs. The mannequin was wearing the retailer's popular "Jamie" jeans, and the shopper, Laura Berry, voiced her concerns that the figure was not an accurate representation of the average female form.

Buyer behaviour for fast fashion: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal: Vol 10, No 3 Author(s): Margaret Bruce (Manchester Business School, Manchester, UK) Lucy Daly (Manchester Business School, Manchester, UK) Citation: Margaret Bruce, Lucy Daly, (2006) "Buyer behaviour for fast fashion", , Vol. 10 Iss: 3, pp.329 - 344

Slow Fashion Consultancy For over a decade businesses, education establishments, arts organisations and the research community, primarily in the fashion and textile sector have been commissioning consultancy services from me. The services I offer work at the forefront of the social, ecological and economic agenda; designing ways to foster change towards sustainability. To discuss a project or learn more about the services I offer, please email me. Is Fashion a Credible Platform for Protest? LONDON, United Kingdom — Last week in Paris, Chanel appropriated the visual signifiers of feminist protest for its seasonal runway show. In a finale led by Karl Lagerfeld, a bevy of supermodels took to a catwalk christened “Boulevard Chanel” holding signs with slogans such as “History is Her Story,” “Make Fashion Not War,” and “Tweed Is Better Than Tweet.” On the same day in Hong Kong, a genuine protest was underway.

Is Fashion a Credible Platform for Protest? Vivienne Westwood Red Label Spring/Summer 2015, Jean Paul Gaultier Spring/Summer 2015, Stella McCartney | Photo Collage: BoF LONDON, United Kingdom — Last week in Paris, Chanel appropriated the visual signifiers of feminist protest for its seasonal runway show. In a finale led by Karl Lagerfeld, a bevy of supermodels took to a catwalk christened “Boulevard Chanel” holding signs with slogans such as “History is Her Story,” “Make Fashion Not War,” and “Tweed Is Better Than Tweet.” On the same day in Hong Kong, a genuine protest was underway.

Fast fashion doesn't automatically mean unsustainable The so called "fast fashion" industry is sometimes perceived as solely responsible for inherently unsustainable working conditions in low wage textile manufacturing countries like Bangladesh and Cambodia. At the Copenhagen Sustainable Fashion Summit on 24th April, a heated panel discussion was held about luxury brands versus high street brands, or as some people like to call them, "fast fashion" brands. On the anniversary of the Rana Plaza disaster, who is to blame? Slow Fashioned One constant thing about fashion is change. Seasonally, trends change the preferred color, silhouette, fabric and more — artificially dictating the obsolescence of a garment. Over the past few decades, fashion trends have been changing at a greater rate due to advances in production technology, shortening the time from concept to store.

Transgender Models Strike A Pose In New Barneys Ads, Catalogs: PHOTOSNewNowNext by Eric Shorey 1/30/2014 Valentijn (on left) wears Giorgio Armani. Ryley (center) wears Armani Collezioni. Leonard and Gloria wear their own clothes. Photo © Bruce Weber. From Chanel to Westwood, 5 times fashion week was about making a political statement Every fashion week, designers and brands from around the globe, from Kanye West to H&M, strive to put on a headline-generating show. For some, that means having a model spin through the air, or projecting images right onto the models themselves. Designers have literally set stages on fire in hopes of getting people's attention. While some designers have used their platforms to shock or excite their audiences, other designers have used their platforms to start a conversation about the day's politics.

Related: