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Lars von Trier

Lars von Trier
Lars von Trier (Danish: [ˈlɑːs fʌn ˈtʁiːˀɐ]; born Lars Trier; 30 April 1956)[2] is a Danish film director and screenwriter. He is closely associated with the Dogme 95 collective – an avant-garde filmmaking movement – although his own films have taken a variety of approaches. Known as a provocateur, his work has frequently divided critical opinion.[3] Nevertheless, Trier is widely regarded as one of the most accomplished and influential directors in world cinema.[4] Early life and education[edit] Lars Trier was born in Kongens Lyngby, north of Copenhagen, the son of Inger Trier (née Høst, 1915—89). He had believed that his biological father was Ulf Trier (1907—78), until his mother revealed to him on her deathbed that he had been conceived as a result of an affair she had with her employer, Fritz Michael Hartmann. In 1979, Trier enrolled in the National Film School of Denmark.[9] His peers at the film school nicknamed him "von Trier". Career[edit] Zentropa and The Kingdom[edit] 2000s[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lars_von_Trier

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Vincenzo Natali Early life[edit] Natali was born in Detroit, Michigan, to a nursery school teacher/painter mother and a photographer father.[1] He is of Italian and English descent.[1] He moved to Toronto, along with his family, at the age of one. During his time in high school, Natali befriended British-born Canadian actor David Hewlett who has appeared in the majority of films that Natali has directed. Dogme 95 Dogme 95 was an avant-garde filmmaking movement started in 1995 by the Danish directors Lars von Trier and Thomas Vinterberg, who created the "Dogme 95 Manifesto" and the "Vow of Chastity" (Danish: kyskhedsløfter). These were rules to create filmmaking based on the traditional values of story, acting, and theme, and excluding the use of elaborate special effects or technology.[1] They were later joined by fellow Danish directors Kristian Levring and Søren Kragh-Jacobsen, forming the Dogme 95 Collective or the Dogme Brethren. Dogme (pronounced [ˈd̥ɒwmə]) is the Danish word for dogma. The genre gained international appeal partly because of its accessibility. It sparked an interest in unknown filmmakers by suggesting that one can make a recognised film of a quality to gain recognition, without being dependent on commissions or huge Hollywood budgets.

Quentin Tarantino Early life[edit] Tarantino was born in Knoxville, Tennessee in 1963.[6] He is the son of actor and amateur musician Tony Tarantino and nurse Connie McHugh.[7][8] He has a younger half-brother named Ron. Tarantino grew bored with the James Best Acting School and left after two years, although he kept in touch with all of his acting friends. He then landed a job which threatened to interfere with his long-term acting ambitions.[17] As an employee of Video Archives, a now-defunct video rental store in Manhattan Beach, he and fellow movie enthusiasts (including Roger Avary) discussed cinema and customer video recommendations at length. He paid close attention to the types of films people liked to rent and has cited that experience as inspiration for his directorial career.[18] Tarantino has been quoted as saying: "When people ask me if I went to film school I tell them 'no, I went to films

Terrence Malick Early life[edit] Film career[edit] Malick started his film career after earning an MFA from the AFI Conservatory in 1969, directing the short film "Lanton Mills". At the AFI, he established contacts with people such as Jack Nicholson, longtime collaborator Jack Fisk, and agent Mike Medavoy, who procured for Malick freelance work revising scripts.

Nanni Moretti Giovanni "Nanni" Moretti (born 19 August 1953) is an Italian film director, producer, screenwriter and actor. The Palme d'Or winner in 2001, in 2012 he was the President of the Jury at the Cannes Film Festival.[1] Life and work[edit] In 1976, Giovanni's first feature film Io sono un autarchico (I am Self-Sufficient) was released. In 1978 he produced the movie Ecce Bombo, which tells the story of a student having problems with his entourage. Alain Resnais In later films, Resnais moved away from the overtly political topics of some previous works and developed his interests in an interaction between cinema and other cultural forms, including theatre, music, and comic books. This led to imaginative adaptations of plays by Alan Ayckbourn, Henri Bernstein and Jean Anouilh, as well as films featuring various kinds of popular song. His films frequently explore the relationship between consciousness, memory, and the imagination, and he was noted for devising innovative formal structures for his narratives.[5][6] Throughout his career, he won many awards from international film festivals and academies. Early life[edit]

Ingmar Bergman Early life[edit] "I devoted my interest to the church's mysterious world of low arches, thick walls, the smell of eternity, the coloured sunlight quivering above the strangest vegetation of medieval paintings and carved figures on ceilings and walls. There was everything that one's imagination could desire — angels, saints, dragons, prophets, devils, humans". Alexander Mackendrick His films made a gradual decline after Ealing Studios closed and he returned to America to become a teacher of filmmaking. He was the cousin of the Scottish writer Roger MacDougall. Biography[edit] He was born on 8 September 1912 the only child of Francis and Martha Mackendrick who had emigrated to the United States from Glasgow in 1911. His father was a ship builder and a civil engineer.

Chroma subsampling It is used in many video encoding schemes — both analog and digital — and also in JPEG encoding. Rationale[edit] In full size, this image shows the difference between four subsampling schemes. Note how similar the color images appear. The lower row shows the resolution of the color information. Roman Polanski Roman Polanski (born Rajmund Roman Thierry Polański; 18 August 1933) is a Polish and, since 1976, naturalized-French[1] film director, producer, writer, and actor. Having made films in Poland, the United Kingdom, France and the United States, he is considered one of the few "truly international filmmakers."[2] Polanski's films have inspired diverse directors, including the Coen brothers,[3] Wes Anderson,[4] David Fincher,[5] Atom Egoyan,[6] Darren Aronofsky,[7] Park Chan-wook,[8] Sean Durkin,[9] Abel Ferrara,[10] and Wes Craven.[11]

David Lynch David Keith Lynch (born January 20, 1946) is an American film director, television director, visual artist, musician and occasional actor. Known for his surrealist films, he has developed a unique cinematic style, which has been dubbed "Lynchian", a style characterized by its dream imagery and meticulous sound design. The surreal, and in many cases, violent, elements contained within his films have been known to "disturb, offend or mystify" audiences.[2] Over his career, Lynch has received three Academy Award nominations[3] for Best Director and a nomination for best screenplay. Lynch has won France's César Award for Best Foreign Film twice, as well as the Palme d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival[4] and a Golden Lion award for lifetime achievement at the Venice Film Festival. Life and career[edit]

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