background preloader

Research Process Livebinder USC-SLIS 742

Research Process Livebinder USC-SLIS 742

http://www.livebinders.com/play/play?id=163092&backurl=/shelf/my

Related:  Information ResearchResearch Help

Research Process Models We know from decades of studies that when people do research, they follow a process with some predictable stages. There are many models of this process. Here are three. As you read, think about what these models have in common. The Search Process Model 1 Step 1: Choosing a Topic and Asking Questions Define your research problem, explore topics, do some background building, and create questions to guide your research.

Summarizing different perspectives on a controversial topic Short Description: Using ProQuest SIRS Issues Researcher or similar database, groups of students work together to find and read four informative magazine articles representing a variety of opinions on a topic. For each magazine article they write an MLA citation. In an oral presentation of less than three minutes per group, they summarize the controversy without giving their own opinions and explain why they chose the four articles. Students are told to be prepared to answer questions about their topic and why they selected each of the four articles. Students are given basic instruction on writing an MLA citation and using a database. May, 1998, From Now On Introduction: The New Plagiarism Could electronic text spawn a virulent strain of student copying? Is cut-and-paste the enemy of thought? Many teachers who work in "wired schools" are complaining that new technologies have made it all too easy for students to gather the ideas of others and present them as their own. The New York Times reports that "cheating is on the rise." (Go to September 16, 1998 article)

What Is Plagiarism? Chris just found some good stuff on the Web for his science report about sharks. He highlights a paragraph that explains that most sharks grow to be only 3 to 4 feet long and can't hurt people. Chris copies it and pastes it into his report. How to Use Information Fluency for Effective Online Research Strategies The Internet is a swelling ocean of information. Navigating through the steady flow of that information ocean can be hazardous. This is certainly true of a student who is not information fluent.

Community of Online Research Assignments Short Description: This assignment is designed to help students develop a thoughtful research topic. Students go through a series of steps, questions, and background reading to help them better understand and refine a research topic. Course Context (e.g. how it was implemented or integrated): This exercise is due week 3, usually before library instruction. As a result, the library created a 4-minute instruction video done as a pre-visit homework assignment called "Developing a Topic with CQ Researcher and Opposing Viewpoints" available on this LibGuide:

Other Side of Plagiarism Most of my Head for the Edge columns, updated and edited, can be found in my latest book. Buy it and I might be able to afford a nicer nursing home one day. Thank you. The Other Side of Plagiarism Head for the Edge, Library Media Connection, September 2004 Here I am!

Find free and fair use photos Grabbing images from Google is easy. You search, copy and paste. It’s a no-brainer and often the first thing students do when creating any sort of digital project that requires images. But how do your students know if they have permission to use someone else’s photos? To be in alignment with the ISTE Standards for Students on digital citizenship, students need to understand copyright and how to find royalty-free images that are OK to use in projects. One example of a digital activity that requires royalty-free media is a book trailer project I often assign to my fifth graders.

Rockwell Schrock's Boolean Machine Move your cursor over the Boolean operators to the left to see how each one works. When using AND, you only receive pages including both of your search terms, though not necessarily next to one another. When using OR, you receive pages containing either one or both of your search terms. The NOT operator is used to find pages including only the first term and excluding the second term. Five Strategies to Help Students Conduct Better Informational Searches Google is great for navigational and transactional searches. If you need to find your way to the movie theater or find the best price for a vacuum cleaner, Google handles those requests quite well. Searches for more meaningful information aren't always handled well by Google. For example, see the some of the nonsense "suggested" search terms that sometimes appear with your search. To break away from the cycles of Google's suggested searches and typical search results, students need to employ some solid search strategies.

Avoiding Plagiarism: Quoting and Paraphrasing General advice When reading a passage, try first to understand it as a whole, rather than pausing to write down specific ideas or phrases. Be selective. Unless your assignment is to do a formal or "literal" paraphrase, you usually don? The Educator’s Guide to Copyright, Fair Use, and Creative Commons The Edublogs support team regularly receives complaints and official requests to remove copyrighted content that users have placed on blogs. The legal jargon with respect to digital copyrights can be confusing – especially since different countries have their own laws and regulations. Understanding digital copyright is an essential skill we need to understand and teach our students. With this post, we hope to dispel a few myths and pull together a complete list of resources for teachers and students to use when blogging and working with content online. This post was originally written by Ronnie Burt, on the Edublogger, on Feb, 2012.

10 Great Tools for Academic Research You Should Know about 1- Zotero Zotero is the only research tool that automatically senses content, allowing you to add it to your personal library with a single click. Whether you're searching for a preprint on arXiv.org, a journal article from JSTOR, a news story from the New York Times, or a book from your university library catalog, Zotero has you covered with support for thousands of sites.

How to read and understand a scientific paper: a guide for non-scientists From vaccinations to climate change, getting science wrong has very real consequences. But journal articles, a primary way science is communicated in academia, are a different format to newspaper articles or blogs and require a level of skill and undoubtedly a greater amount of patience. Here Jennifer Raff has prepared a helpful guide for non-scientists on how to read a scientific paper. These steps and tips will be useful to anyone interested in the presentation of scientific findings and raise important points for scientists to consider with their own writing practice. My post, The truth about vaccinations: Your physician knows more than the University of Google sparked a very lively discussion, with comments from several people trying to persuade me (and the other readers) that their paper disproved everything that I’d been saying.

Related: