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Wisdom

Wisdom
Definitions[edit] Charles Haddon Spurgeon defined wisdom as "the right use of knowledge".[2] Robert I. Sutton and Andrew Hargadon defined the "attitude of wisdom" as "acting with knowledge while doubting what one knows".[3] Philosophical perspectives[edit] The ancient Romans also valued wisdom. Wisdom is also important within Christianity. Educational perspectives[edit] Truth and Wisdom assist History in writing by Jacob de Wit, 1754 Public schools in the US have an approach to character education. Nicholas Maxwell, a contemporary philosopher in the United Kingdom, advocates that academia ought to alter its focus from the acquisition of knowledge to seeking and promoting wisdom, which he defines as the capacity to realize what is of value in life, for oneself and others.[10] He teaches that new knowledge and technological know-how increase our power to act which, without wisdom, may cause human suffering and death as well as human benefit. Psychological perspectives[edit] Dr. Sapience[edit] Related:  From me to we/consciousness

Sharing Sharing food Sharing is the joint use of a resource or space. In its narrow sense, it refers to joint or alternating use of an inherently finite good, such as a common pasture or a shared residence. It is also the process of dividing and distributing. Apart from obvious instances, which we can observe in human activity, we can also find many examples of this happening in nature. When an organism takes in nutrition or oxygen for instance, its internal organs are designed to divide and distribute the energy taken in, to supply parts of its body that need it. In a market[edit] The concept of intellectual property makes some sharing illegal for certain intangible goods. Sharing figures prominently in gift economies, but also can play a significant role in market economies, for example in car sharing. In computer and internet culture[edit] Sharing is a key feature in the developing field of free software and open source software, with implications for economics. In computer science[edit] [edit]

Discernment Discernment is the activity of determining the value and quality of a certain subject or event, particularly the activity of going past the mere perception of something and making detailed judgments about that thing. As a virtue, a discerning individual is considered to possess wisdom, and be of good judgement; especially so with regard to subject matter often overlooked by others. Discernment of spirits[edit] For the Discernment of spirits, see: Knowledge management Knowledge management (KM) is the process of capturing, developing, sharing, and effectively using organizational knowledge.[1] It refers to a multi-disciplined approach to achieving organisational objectives by making the best use of knowledge.[2] An established discipline since 1991 (see Nonaka 1991), KM includes courses taught in the fields of business administration, information systems, management, and library and information sciences.[3][4] More recently, other fields have started contributing to KM research; these include information and media, computer science, public health, and public policy.[5] Columbia University and Kent State University offer dedicated Master of Science degrees in Knowledge Management.[6][7][8] History[edit] In 1999, the term personal knowledge management was introduced; it refers to the management of knowledge at the individual level.[14] Research[edit] Dimensions[edit] The Knowledge Spiral as described by Nonaka & Takeuchi. Strategies[edit] Motivations[edit]

Love of learning A philomath (/ˈfɪlɵmæθ/; Greek: φίλος philos ("beloved," "loving," as in philosophy or philanthropy) + Greek μανθάνειν manthanein, math- ("to learn," as in polymath) is a lover of learning. Philomathy is similar to, but distinguished from, philosophy in that "soph," the latter suffix, specifies "wisdom" or "knowledge", rather than the process of acquisition thereof. "Philomath" is not synonymous with "polymath." The shift in meaning for "mathema" is likely a result of the rapid categorization during the time of Plato and Aristotle of their "mathemata" in terms of education: arithmetic, geometry, astronomy, and music (the Quadrivium), which the Greeks found to create a "natural grouping" of mathematical (in our modern usage; "doctrina mathematica" for theirs) precepts. See also[edit] External links[edit]

How to embed webpage in blog with iFrame Suppose you want to integrate a website or a particular webpage with your blog. Some possibilities, you may be auctioning some items on eBay and you want your ebay offering in your blog or perhaps you have an Amazon AStore and want to embed the AStore into a post in your blog. Click here to see a sample. Note: Embedding a webpage in an iFrame in your own blog of website is equivalent to copying that webpage into your own website or blog so it is good to ask permission of that webpage you want to embed. In the example below, I uses my ownAmazon's Blogger's AStore Bookshop so there no copyright issue as it is my own webpage. What you can do is to first obtain the URL of that webpage and put it in an iFrame as follows:<iframe src ="URL of the website you want to embed" width="100%" height="300"><p>Your browser does not support iframes. The variables you can change are highlighted in red. The part highlighted in green:<p>Your browser does not support iframes.

Rage From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Rage may refer to: Games[edit] Literature[edit] Film and television[edit] Music[edit] Other uses[edit] Reality Not to be confused with Realty. Philosophers, mathematicians, and other ancient and modern thinkers, such as Aristotle, Plato, Frege, Wittgenstein, and Russell, have made a distinction between thought corresponding to reality, coherent abstractions (thoughts of things that are imaginable but not real), and that which cannot even be rationally thought. By contrast existence is often restricted solely to that which has physical existence or has a direct basis in it in the way that thoughts do in the brain. Reality is often contrasted with what is imaginary, delusional, (only) in the mind, dreams, what is false, what is fictional, or what is abstract. The truth refers to what is real, while falsity refers to what is not. Related concepts World views and theories A common colloquial usage would have reality mean "perceptions, beliefs, and attitudes toward reality," as in "My reality is not your reality." Many of the concepts of science and philosophy are often defined culturally and socially.

Knowledge transfer In organizational theory, knowledge transfer is the practical problem of transferring knowledge from one part of the organization to another. Like knowledge management, knowledge transfer seeks to organize, create, capture or distribute knowledge and ensure its availability for future users. It is considered to be more than just a communication problem. Background[edit] Argote & Ingram (2000) define knowledge transfer as "the process through which one unit (e.g., group, department, or division) is affected by the experience of another"[1] (p. 151). Szulanski's doctoral dissertation ("Exploring internal stickiness: Impediments to the transfer of best practice within the firm") proposed that knowledge transfer within a firm is inhibited by factors other than a lack of incentive. Knowledge transfer includes, but encompasses more than, technology transfer. Knowledge transfer between public and private domains[edit] Knowledge transfer in landscape ecology[edit] Types of knowledge[edit]

Curiosity Curious children gather around photographer Toni Frissell, looking at her camera Curiosity (from Latin curiosus "careful, diligent, curious," akin to cura "care") is a quality related to inquisitive thinking such as exploration, investigation, and learning, evident by observation in human and many animal species.[1][2] The term can also be used to denote the behavior itself being caused by the emotion of curiosity. As this emotion represents a thirst for knowledge, curiosity is a major driving force behind scientific research and other disciplines of human study. Causes[edit] Children peer over shoulders to see what their friends are reading. Although many living beings have an innate capability of curiosity, it should not be categorized as an instinct because it is not a fixed action pattern; rather it is an innate basic emotion because, while curiosity can be expressed in many ways, the expression of an instinct is typically more fixed and less flexible. Brain[edit] Attention[edit]

Homosexuality The most common terms for homosexual people are lesbian for females and gay for males, though gay is also used to refer generally to both homosexual males and females. The number of people who identify as gay or lesbian and the proportion of people who have same-sex sexual experiences are difficult for researchers to estimate reliably for a variety of reasons, including many gay people not openly identifying as such due to homophobia and heterosexist discrimination.[10] Homosexual behavior has also been documented and is observed in many non-human animal species.[11][12][13][14][15] Etymology Gay generally refers to male homosexuality,[citation needed] but may be used in a broader sense to refer to all LGBT people. In the context of sexuality, lesbian refers only to female homosexuality. The word "lesbian" is derived from the name of the Greek island Lesbos, where the poet Sappho wrote largely about her emotional relationships with young women.[34][35] History Africa Americas East Asia Europe

Humanism In modern times, humanist movements are typically aligned with secularism, and today "Humanism" typically refers to a non-theistic life stance centred on human agency, and looking to science instead of religious dogma in order to understand the world.[2] Background The word "Humanism" is ultimately derived from the Latin concept humanitas, and, like most other words ending in -ism, entered English in the nineteenth century. However, historians agree that the concept predates the label invented to describe it, encompassing the various meanings ascribed to humanitas, which included both benevolence toward one's fellow humans and the values imparted by bonae litterae or humane learning (literally "good letters"). In the second century A.D, a Latin grammarian, Aulus Gellius (c. 125– c. 180), complained: Gellius says that in his day humanitas is commonly used as a synonym for philanthropy – or kindness and benevolence toward one's fellow human being. History Predecessors Asia Ancient Greece Types

Knowledge Knowledge acquisition involves complex cognitive processes: perception, communication, and reasoning; while knowledge is also said to be related to the capacity of acknowledgment in human beings.[2] Theories of knowledge[edit] In contrast to this approach, Wittgenstein observed, following Moore's paradox, that one can say "He believes it, but it isn't so," but not "He knows it, but it isn't so." [5] He goes on to argue that these do not correspond to distinct mental states, but rather to distinct ways of talking about conviction. What is different here is not the mental state of the speaker, but the activity in which they are engaged. For example, on this account, to know that the kettle is boiling is not to be in a particular state of mind, but to perform a particular task with the statement that the kettle is boiling. Communicating knowledge[edit] Symbolic representations can be used to indicate meaning and can be thought of as a dynamic process. Situated knowledge[edit]

Related:  (7) Courage