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Marcus Aurelius

Marcus Aurelius
Marcus Aurelius (/ɔːˈriːliəs/; Latin: Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Augustus;[1][notes 1] 26 April 121 – 17 March 180 AD) was Roman Emperor from 161 to 180. He ruled with Lucius Verus as co-emperor from 161 until Verus' death in 169. Marcus Aurelius was the last of the so-called Five Good Emperors. He was a practitioner of Stoicism, and his untitled writing, commonly known as the Meditations, is the most significant source of the modern understanding of ancient Stoic philosophy. During his reign, the Empire defeated a revitalized Parthian Empire in the East: Aurelius' general Avidius Cassius sacked the capital Ctesiphon in 164. In central Europe, Aurelius fought the Marcomanni, Quadi, and Sarmatians with success during the Marcomannic Wars, although the threat of the Germanic tribes began to represent a troubling reality for the Empire. Sources[edit] Denarius, struck 140 AD with portrait of Antoninus Pius (obverse) and his adoptive son Marcus Aurelius (reverse). Early life and career[edit] ...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marcus_Aurelius

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Meditations Meditations (Τὰ εἰς ἑαυτόν, Ta eis heauton, literally "thoughts/writings addressed to himself") is a series of personal writings by Marcus Aurelius, Roman Emperor 161–180 CE, setting forth his ideas on Stoic philosophy. Marcus Aurelius wrote the 12 books of the Meditations in Koine Greek[1] as a source for his own guidance and self-improvement. It is possible that large portions of the work were written at Sirmium, where he spent much time planning military campaigns from 170 to 180. Sociotechnical system Sociotechnical systems (STS) in organizational development is an approach to complex organizational work design that recognizes the interaction between people and technology in workplaces. The term also refers to the interaction between society's complex infrastructures and human behaviour. In this sense, society itself, and most of its substructures, are complex sociotechnical systems.

Marcus Aurelius Meditations, Introduction Public Domain Translation and Introduction to the Meditations of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius The translator is unnamed. Introduction Marcus Aurelius Antoninus was born on April 26, A.D. 121. Disruptive innovation Sustaining innovations are typically innovations in technology, whereas disruptive innovations cause changes to markets. For example, the automobile was a revolutionary technological innovation, but it was not a disruptive innovation, because early automobiles were expensive luxury items that did not disrupt the market for horse-drawn vehicles. The market for transportation essentially remained intact until the debut of the lower priced Ford Model T in 1908.

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The Manual of New Stoicism - The Rational Science-Based Non-Christian Philosophy - The Meditations of Marcus Aurelius: Selections Annotated & Explained by Russell McNeil PhD "Marcus Aurelius in his Meditations implores human beings to exercise their 'divine' gift of reason to uncover the laws of nature. For Marcus Aurelius our reason is what defines our core humanity, and our reason is governed by the same physical laws that govern the stars. When we explore nature and when we visit the stars today we are doing what Aurelius commands, and in so doing we uncover those same laws that we were meant to live by. The Stoics demanded that we must 'live according to nature.' We cannot live according to nature until we understand what nature is. Our exploration of Mars is the latest stage in a complex human journey that we humans began nearly two thousand years ago." - Russell McNeil, PhD, Mars LIDAR pioneer & author

Nicholas Confessore Nicholas Confessore is a political correspondent on the National Desk of The New York Times.[1] Early life[edit] Confessore grew up in New York City and attended Hunter College High School.

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