Bloom's Taxonomy According to Pirates of the Caribbean

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qjhKmhKjzsQ

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Bloom's and ICT tools Many teachers use Bloom's Taxonomy and Bloom's Revised Taxonomy in developing and structuring their teaching & learning experiences. Bloom's Digital taxonomy is an attempt to marry Bloom's revised taxonomy and the key verbs to digital approaches and tools. This is not a replacements to the verbs in the revised taxonomy, rather it suppliments and supports these by including recent developments, processes and tools. This page looks at some specific examples of tools and match them to Bloom's Digital Taxonomy Many of these tools that are FOSS (Free or Open Source Software). These are in italics.

Bloom's Taxonomy From Emerging Perspectives on Learning, Teaching and Technology Mary Forehand The University of Georgia Introduction One of the basic questions facing educators has always been "Where do we begin in seeking to improve human thinking?" (Houghton, 2004). Fortunately we do not have to begin from scratch in searching for answers to this complicated question.

Bloom’s Taxonomy by Patricia Armstrong, Assistant Director, Center for Teaching Background Information In 1956, Benjamin Bloom with collaborators Max Englehart, Edward Furst, Walter Hill, and David Krathwohl published a framework for categorizing educational goals: Taxonomy of Educational Objectives. Familiarly known as Bloom’s Taxonomy, this framework has been applied by generations of K-12 teachers and college instructors in their teaching. The framework elaborated by Bloom and his collaborators consisted of six major categories: Knowledge, Comprehension, Application, Analysis, Synthesis, and Evaluation. Major Categories in the Taxonomy of Educational Objectives Knowledge remembering of previously learned material; of terminology; specific facts; ways and means of dealing with specifics (conventions, trends and sequences, classifications and categories, criteria, methodology); universals and abstractions in a field (principles and generalizations, theories and structures): Knowledge is (here) defined as the remembering (recalling) of appropriate, previously learned information. defines; describes; enumerates; identifies; labels; lists; matches; names; reads; records; reproduces; selects; states; views; writes;. Comprehension: Grasping (understanding) the meaning of informational materials.

Bloom's Taxonomy and a Pen As our school division works on AISI project on Critical Thinking (Alberta Initiative for School Improvement), we are focusing on higher level thinking strategies within our classroom. From the time I started university, we have talked about Bloom’s taxonomy and known the importance of higher level questions. Yesterday though, my colleague and friend, Scott Johnston, did a wonderful presentation on assessment. He used a very simple analogy about a pen and how we can look at an object like that and develop our understanding of the different levels of questions.

A Model of Learning Objectives A statement of a learning objective contains a verb (an action) and an object (usually a noun). The verb generally refers to [actions associated with] the intended cognitive process. The object generally describes the knowledge students are expected to acquire or construct. (Anderson and Krathwohl, 2001, pp. 4–5) The cognitive process dimension represents a continuum of increasing cognitive complexity—from remember to create. Anderson and Krathwohl identify 19 specific cognitive processes that further clarify the bounds of the six categories (Table 1).

Bloom’s Taxonomy Poster for Elementary Teachers [Updated Nov 9, 2009 - Thanks for the feedback everyone! A special thanks to Mr. Portman & Ms. Quirk for their additional comments. Mr. Bloom's Digital Taxonomy This is the introduction to Bloom's Digital Taxonomy. The different taxonomical levels can be viewed individually via the navigation bar or below this introduction as embedded pages. This is an update to Bloom's Revised Taxonomy which attempts to account for the new behaviours and actions emerging as technology advances and becomes more ubiquitous.

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