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Rain Forest Threats, Rain Forest Species

Rain Forest Threats, Rain Forest Species
More than half of Earth’s rain forests have already been lost forever to the insatiable human demand for wood and arable land. Rain forests that once grew over 14 percent of the land on Earth now cover only about 6 percent. And if current deforestation rates continue, these critical habitats could disappear from the planet completely within the next hundred years. The reasons for plundering rain forests are mainly economic. Wealthy nations drive demand for tropical timber, and cash-strapped governments often grant logging concessions at a fraction of the land’s true value. “Homesteader” policies also encourage citizens to clear-cut forests for farms. Threats Solutions

http://environment.nationalgeographic.com/environment/habitats/rainforest-threats/

Related:  DeforestationDestruction of RainforestDeforestation 2017Destroying Rainforest

Deforestation Forests cover 31% of the land area on our planet. They produce vital oxygen and provide homes for people and wildlife. Many of the world’s most threatened and endangered animals live in forests, and 1.6 billion people rely on benefits forests offer, including food, fresh water, clothing, traditional medicine and shelter. But forests around the world are under threat from deforestation, jeopardizing these benefits. Deforestation comes in many forms, including fires, clear-cutting for agriculture, ranching and development, unsustainable logging for timber, and degradation due to climate change. This impacts people’s livelihoods and threatens a wide range of plant and animal species.

Deforestation - Wikipedia Satellite photograph of deforestation in progress in eastern Bolivia. Worldwide, 10 percent of wilderness areas were lost between 1990 and 2015.[1] Deforestation, clearance or clearing is the removal of a forest or stand of trees where the land is thereafter converted to a non-forest use.[2] Examples of deforestation include conversion of forestland to farms, ranches, or urban use. The most concentrated deforestation occurs in tropical rainforests.[3] About 30% of Earth's land surface is covered by forests.[4]

What is deforestation? What is deforestation? Deforestation is when humans remove or clear large areas of forest lands and related ecosystems for non-forest use. These include clearing for farming purposes, ranching and urban use. In these cases, trees are never re-planted. Since the industrial age, about half of world's original forests have been destroyed and millions of animals and living things have been endangered.

Why is slash-and-burn deforestation particularly harmful In heavily forested areas, or those with little usable soil for farming, natives often turn to slash-and-burn deforestation to feed their families. This traditional farming technique involves cutting down most of the vegetation on a patch of land, then setting fire to the remainder. The resulting ashes serve as viable nutrients for future farming on the site, although only for a brief period. People in many parts of the world have relied on slash-and-burn farming for thousands of years, and some estimates suggest it's used on half of all land in tropical areas [source: Virginia Tech].

Deforestation Forests cover 31% of the land area on our planet. They produce vital oxygen and provide homes for people and wildlife. Many of the world’s most threatened and endangered animals live in forests, and 1.6 billion people rely on benefits forests offer, including food, fresh water, clothing, traditional medicine and shelter. Forests Tropical rainforest Tropical rainforests contain the greatest species diversity of all biomes on Earth, and are thought to be the world’s oldest living ecosystems. Found near the equator in Africa, Asia and Central and South America, these are lush, dense forests characterised by consistently heavy rainfall and year-round high temperatures of between 18 and 25 degrees Celsius. In a single year, a tropical rainforest can experience an impressive 254 centimetres of rain, often causing nutrients to leach from the soil. This, combined with the lack of light penetrating through the trees, means that very few plants grow on the forest floor, which is instead mostly covered with soil and dead plants.

Deforestation Facts, Deforestation Information, Effects of Deforestation Modern-Day Plague Deforestation is clearing Earth's forests on a massive scale, often resulting in damage to the quality of the land. Forests still cover about 30 percent of the world’s land area, but swaths the size of Panama are lost each and every year. The world’s rain forests could completely vanish in a hundred years at the current rate of deforestation. Forests are cut down for many reasons, but most of them are related to money or to people’s need to provide for their families.The biggest driver of deforestation is agriculture.

Deforestation Facts for Kids - The World Counts TheWorldCounts, 22 July, 2014 When you see paper and wood, what do you think of? Do you think of the tree that was felled to make the product? Before we started to build cities many centuries ago, they say that 60% of the Earth was covered in Forests. Now, there is less than 10% left. Logging in the Amazon Hundreds of illegal mahogany logs hidden under the forest canopy exposed by Greenpeace and Brazilian government officials. With the depletion of forests in Southeast Asia and central Africa, the Amazon is being targeted by domestic and transnational corporations as a key source for tropical timber products. Huge majestic trees like the Samauma, also known as the "Queen of the Forest", are being exploitedto make cheap plywood for construction industries in the US, Japan and Europe. Working in remote forest areas, the loggers often use false permits, ignore limitations of legal permits, cut species protected by law and steal from protected areas and indigenous lands.

Deforestation Facts, Deforestation Information, Effects of Deforestation Modern-Day Plague Deforestation is clearing Earth's forests on a massive scale, often resulting in damage to the quality of the land. Forests still cover about 30 percent of the world’s land area, but swaths the size of Panama are lost each and every year. The world’s rain forests could completely vanish in a hundred years at the current rate of deforestation. Forests are cut down for many reasons, but most of them are related to money or to people’s need to provide for their families.The biggest driver of deforestation is agriculture.

Wildfires Article, Forest Fires Information, Wildland Fires Facts Uncontrolled blazes fueled by weather, wind, and dry underbrush, wildfires can burn acres of land—and consume everything in their paths—in mere minutes. On average, more than 100,000 wildfires, also called wildland fires or forest fires, clear 4 million to 5 million acres (1.6 million to 2 million hectares) of land in the U.S. every year. In recent years, wildfires have burned up to 9 million acres (3.6 million hectares) of land. A wildfire moves at speeds of up to 14 miles an hour (23 kilometers an hour), consuming everything—trees, brush, homes, even humans—in its path.

The Economist ON DECEMBER 8th, the Supreme Court heard back to back arguments in cases involving the idea that everyone’s vote should bear roughly equal weight—the so-called “one person, one vote” principle that was developed in a series of cases in the 1960s. Evenwel v Abbott, a challenge to the calculus Texas uses to work out population, makes an appearance in this week’s paper. Harris v Arizona Independent Redistricting Commission, which poses a similarly fraught question about district map-drawing, was argued one hour prior to Evenwel. Harris re-ignites a debate most court watchers thought was long settled: whether and to what extent America's constitution permits partisan considerations to factor into the drawing of electoral maps. Until last week, the justices looked askance only at racial gerrymandering. Now at least a few Supremes seem to be entertaining the idea that there may be sharp limits on partisan political considerations as well, at least where voter equality is at stake.

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