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Public Domain Collections: Free to Share & Reuse

That means everyone has the freedom to enjoy and reuse these materials in almost limitless ways. The Library now makes it possible to download such items in the highest resolution available directly from the Digital Collections website. Search Digital Collections No permission required. No restrictions on use. Below you'll find tools, projects, and explorations designed to inspire your own creations—go forth and reuse! Visualize the Public Domain An experiment by NYPL Labs to help patrons understand and explore what is contained in this release. Discover the Collections Learn more about our public domain release. Use Our Data and Utilities Our digitized collections are available as machine-readable data: over one million records for you to search, crawl and compute. As a way to introduce you to our public domain collections and inspire new works, NYPL Labs has developed a suite of projects that show some of the possibilities contained in this rich material. Navigating the Green Books

https://www.nypl.org/research/collections/digital-collections/public-domain

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The National Archives Catalog Search the National Archives Catalog and other National Archives resources at once for information about our records. We’re excited to announce that in the National Archives Catalog you can now: Enjoy the updated homepage featuring background images from Catalog records Add your comments on digitized records, descriptions, and authority records Find what you need with a more intuitive advanced search Efficiently browse search results with better “Next Page” link placement Track your citizen archivist contributions with updated user account pages Add data from scanned records to your developer toolbox with increased API functionality We Want to Hear from You! Let us know what you think – what you like and what you don't!

Met Museum Open Access Makes 375,000 Pieces Available for Free Claude Monet, Bridge Over a Pond of Water Lilies (1899) Renowned for its comprehensive collection of work that captures “5,000 years of art spanning all cultures and time periods,” New York City’s world famous Metropolitan Museum of Art has recently announced that 375,000 of its pieces in the public domain are now available without restrictions. As an update to a similar 2014 initiative, the new policy, called Open Access, allows individuals to easily access the images and use them for “any purpose, including commercial and noncommercial use, free of charge and without requiring permission from the Museum.” The available works represent a wide range of movements, styles, and mediums, and span iconic paintings by Claude Monet and Vincent van Gogh to centuries-old costumes and armor.

Constitutional Rights Foundation - lessons CRF provides classroom teachers and students with high-quality content and thought-provoking questioning strategies to promote critical-thinking development, open discussion of issues, and interactive activities to heighten learning. When addressing controversial contemporary or historical issues, we strive to provide a balanced presentation and multiple perspectives. Most of our lessons directly address national and state standards, and additionally we are aligning to the Common Core State Standards in English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social-Sciences. Your publications are wonderful, I consider them among the finest historical publications I receive, they enhance and deepen my own understanding. Thank you again for your consistently polished products. — Chris H., Teacher

Free Images - FreeJPG In freejpg can find images with three different types of license: License Basic You can: No Mention Author - No attribution to the original author . Edit image - to adapt the work . Commercial Use - use this picture for commercial purposes. The Art Institute of Chicago Puts 44,000+ Works of Art Online: View Them in High Resolution After the fire that totally destroyed Brazil’s Museu Nacional in Rio, many people lamented that the museum had not digitally backed up its collection and pointed to the event as a tragic example of why such digitization is so necessary. Just a couple decades ago, storing and displaying this much information was impossible, so it may seem like a strange demand to make. And in any case, two-dimensional images stored on servers—or even 3D printed copies—cannot replace or substitute for original, priceless artifacts or works of art. But museums around the world that have digitized most--or all--of their collections don’t claim to have replicated or replaced the experience of an in-person visit, or to have rendered physical media obsolete. Digital collections provide access to millions of people who cannot, or will not, ever travel to the major cities in which fine art resides, and they give millions of scholars, teachers, and students resources once available only to a select few.

60 Totally Free Design Resources for Non-Designers Creating engaging visual content doesn’t have to require a financial investment. Sure, at one time graphic designers needed expensive software and even more costly images to craft a winning visual campaign. But thanks to a host of free online resources, anyone can design high-quality visual stories with ease. Of course, navigating the sea of online images and editing tools is easier said than done.

List of medical ethics cases - Wikipedia From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Some cases have been remarkable for starting broad discussion and for setting precedent in medical ethics. Research[edit] Piktochart Infographics Gallery Login Sign Up Over 600 Templates To Make Information Beautiful 25 Million Images From 14 Art Institutions to Be Digitized & Put Online In One Huge Scholarly Archive Digital art archives, says Thomas Gaehtgens, director of the Getty Research Institute, are “Sleeping Beauties, and they are waiting to be discovered and kissed.” It’s an odd metaphor, especially since the archive to which Gaehtgens refers currently contains photographic treasures like that of Medieval Christian art from the Netherlands Institute for Art History. But soon, Pharos, the “International Consortium of Photo Archives,” will host 25 million images, Ted Loos reports at The New York Times, “17 million of them artworks and the rest supplemental material." The archive aims to have 7 million online by 2020.

Download 100,000 Free Art Images in High-Resolution from The Getty When I want to get a good look at the city of Los Angeles, I go up to the Getty Center in the Santa Monica Mountains. I can also, of course, get a pretty good look at some art at the museum there. But if I don’t feel like making that trek up the hill — and if you don’t feel like making the trek from wherever you live — The Getty can give you, in some ways, an even better way to look at art online. Just visit the Getty’s Open Content Program. Seeing as this sort of free cultural resource fits right into our wheelhouse here at Open Culture, we’ve tried to keep you posted on the archive’s development over the past few years. Last time we passed the word along, the Getty’s digital public-domain archive of high-resolution images had grown to 87,000, and now it has nearly hit the 100,000 mark (99,989, to be exact)— which sounds to us like just the time to keep you posted on what you can find therein.

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