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What Meaningful Reflection On Student Work Can Do for Learning

The following excerpt is from “Authentic Learning in the Digital Age: Engaging Students Through Inquiry,” by Larissa Pahomov. This excerpt is from the chapter entitled “Making Reflection Relevant.” Characteristics of Meaningful Reflection For student reflection to be meaningful, it must be metacognitive, applicable, and shared with others. Let’s look at each of these characteristics in turn. Metacognitive Although it’s something of a buzz word, “metacognition” is a state of mind that can be useful for all the core values presented in this book. When children are first learning to reflect on their work, their educators use simple prompts to get them thinking: Do you like what you made? Of course, there’s a danger of this metacognition turning into a kind of feedback loop: Am I reflecting adequately on my reflection? ➤ The digital connection. Applicable This kind of isolated, after-the-fact reflection dominates our understanding of the process. ➤ The digital connection. Shared

https://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2014/12/03/what-meaningful-reflection-on-student-work-can-do-for-learning/

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iPad students learn the most important skill There’s something in the air and like the best of things, it’s exciting and scary at the same time. More and more articles like this one and this one and even this one proclaim the death of so many jobs over the next 20 years and magazines like this one explain why people not learning to adapt will be disastrous for everyone, especially current school kids. The major problem for school children is that traditionally, the classroom doesn’t demand they practice adapting to a situation or problem solve open-ended enough scenarios. Reimagining Literacy Through Global Collaboration Since 2010, my students and I have been bringing the world in. We have asked others to be our teachers, whether authors, experts, children. We have asked others to share more of their world with us so that we could make more sense of our own. We have created, we have become experts. We have made the world smaller by becoming a moving piece of the world, and we have grown. In our literacy collaborations and creations, we have become authors, poets, performers, and teachers.

Making Learning Visible: Doodling Helps Memories Stick Shelley Paul and Jill Gough had heard that doodling while taking notes could help improve memory and concept retention, but as instructional coaches they were reluctant to bring the idea to teachers without trying it out themselves first. To give it a fair shot, Paul tried sketching all her notes from a two-day conference. By the end, her drawings had improved and she was convinced the approach could work for kids, too. “It causes you to listen at a different level,” said Jill Gough, director of teaching and learning at Trinity Schools.

The concept of different “learning styles” is one of the greatest neuroscience myths Are you a visual learner who writes notes in a rainbow of different colors, or do you have to read something aloud before it will sink it? Chances are, you’ve been asked a similar question at some point in your life, and believe the concept of different “learning styles” is perfectly valid. But, as Quartz reported in December, we all learn in fundamentally similar ways. We Aren't Using Assessments Correctly Published Online: October 27, 2015 Published in Print: October 28, 2015, as The Effective Use of Testing: What the Research Says Commentary By John Hattie Much of the testing discussion in the United States today is grounded on several widely accepted notions: that we first must get the actual assessment instrument right, that there is an important distinction between "formative" and "summative" assessment, that teachers need to understand the language of assessment, and that we should drop tests on schools like "precision bombs" for the purpose of measuring a student's performance and progress. These notions are misguided, as decades of research from around the world on what matters most in student learning demonstrates.

Teaching Students to Reflect in Steps Self-assessment and reflection is key to the forward movement of a student’s learning and potential achievement. The more able a student is to talk about his/her learning in a cognizant way, the better chance he/she has in achieving his/her goals. This is why it is imperative for us to teach students how to do this effectively. We can’t merely assume that by saying to a student, “go reflect on this last assignment,” that he/she will know what we mean. It’s likely, they won’t. When we say reflection, students hear, “what did you like about this assignment?”

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Wix Launches WixEd, A Free Online School For Website Design DIY website creator Wix wants to make starting a career in web design as easy as it’s made building your own site. Today, the company is launching WixEd, a free online education program that teaches Wix users everything they need to know to launch their own website design business. The course consists of three parts: Wix Webmaster, which teaches web design with the tools Wix provides, and two business and marketing classes that cover all aspects of running a small business with intros to SEO, e-commerce, accounting, and photography. A group of Wix instructors are on call to answer questions and review the homework that’s assigned after each section, including building a website for a real small business client. “It’s not only about building websites, it’s about being the person who is responsible for the online presence of a small business,” says Yuval Finkelstein, who is running the WixEd program for Wix.

Involving students / Topics / Gathering evidence / Using evidence for learning / Home You are here: Assessment is done with the student, not to the student As is the case with teaching and learning, assessment is a collaborative endeavour between the teacher and the student – where both want to determine what the student knows and what might be learnt next. Therefore, a major role for the teacher is to manage the learning culture of the classroom in order to maximise students' motivation to engage keenly with assessment. If the student is not motivated to try with the assessment, it is likely that the results will not really show what the student knows or can do.

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