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A Trip to the Moon / Le Voyage dans la lune - 1902

A Trip to the Moon / Le Voyage dans la lune - 1902
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Griffiths psilocybin The following Q&A is with Roland Griffiths, the study’s lead researcher. Q 1: Why did you undertake this research? In the 1950s and 1960s, basic science and applied research studies were taking place with hallucinogens, offering hints that they might be of value in psychotherapy, addiction treatment, and creativity enhancement, and suggestions that the hallucinogens can occasion mystical-type experiences. Laws enacted in response to excesses of the "psychedelic 1960s" stopped almost all that work, leaving some promising threads dangling. Despite ongoing illicit and licit use, remarkably little is known, from the standpoint of modern psychopharmacology research, about the acute and long-term effects of the hallucinogens. Q 2: Do you have any sign that the same brain "machinery" affected by psilocybin is identical to what people experience in spiritual epiphanies that occur without drugs? Q 3: Is this God in a pill? Q 5: Should religions feel threatened by this work? I can’t see why. Dr.

Peter Gandy (author) The Complete Guide to World Mysticism (1998)The Hermetica: The Lost Wisdom of the Pharaohs (1998)The Wisdom of the Pagan Philosophers (The Wisdom of the World) (1999)The Jesus Mysteries: Was the "Original Jesus" a Pagan God? (1999)Jesus and the Lost Goddess: The Secret Teachings of the Original Christians (2002)The Laughing Jesus: Religious Lies and Gnostic Wisdom (2005)The Gospel of the Second Coming (2007)

Aldous Huxley Aldous Leonard Huxley /ˈhʌksli/ (26 July 1894 – 22 November 1963) was an English writer, philosopher and a prominent member of the Huxley family. He was best known for his novels including Brave New World, set in a dystopian London, and for non-fiction books, such as The Doors of Perception, which recalls experiences when taking a psychedelic drug, and a wide-ranging output of essays. Early in his career Huxley edited the magazine Oxford Poetry, and published short stories and poetry. Huxley was a humanist, pacifist, and satirist. Early life[edit] Huxley began his learning in his father's well-equipped botanical laboratory, then went to Hillside School, Malvern. I believe his blindness was a blessing in disguise. Following his education at Balliol, Huxley was financially indebted to his father and had to earn a living. Career[edit] Huxley completed his first (unpublished) novel at the age of 17 and began writing seriously in his early 20s. Bloomsbury Set[edit] United States[edit]

Kathleen Harrison Vault : Kat Harrison, Botanical Dimensions, and the Shamanic Plant Mind Since the introduction of shamanic plants and medicines to Western science, many anthropologists and laboratory wizards have struggled to divine their cultural significance and figure out how they work their peculiar magic. Yet, in spite of all the work done in university laboratories, sterile hospitals, and million-dollar pharmaceutical research wings, conventional science has done little to unravel the ancient mysteries of shamanic healing power. Divorced from traditional contexts, shamanic folk medicines and visionary practices have remained a mystery. It is only recently, through the work of researchers in the "softer" sciences of ethno- and entheobotany, that the true role of these plants could be understood in terms the Western mind could appreciate. Despite the ancient wisdom and power offered by these plant spirits, shamanic plants and practices are now threatened by the encroachment of industrialized forces into rainforest societies.

Kathleen Harrison Vault Kathleen Harrison is an ethnobotanist, artist, and photographer who researches the relationship between plants and people, with a particular focus on art, myth, ritual, and spirituality. Harrison teaches in Hawaii, California, and the Peruvian Amazon. She has done fieldwork in Latin America for 30 years, and is the President and Projects Director of Botanical Dimensions, a non-profit foundation devoted to preserving medicinal and shamanic plant knowledge from the Amazonian rainforest and tropics around the world. Harrison co-founded the organization in 1985 with former husband, the late Terence McKenna. Harrison is a popular lecturer at conferences, seminars, and workshops; she continues to document the many faces of ethnobotany with photographs, which she combines with stories in her slide presentations.

Michael Persinger Michael A. Persinger (born June 26, 1945) is a cognitive neuroscience researcher and university professor with over 200 peer-reviewed publications. He has worked at Laurentian University, located in Sudbury, Ontario, since 1971. He is primarily notable for his experimental work in the field of neurotheology, work which has been increasingly criticized in recent years.[1][3][4][5][6] Early life[edit] Research and academic work[edit] Much of his work focuses on the commonalities that exist between the sciences, and aims to integrate fundamental concepts of various branches of science.[8] He organized the Behavioral Neuroscience Program at Laurentian University in Sudbury, Ontario, integrating chemistry, biology and psychology. Research in parapsychology[edit] Research in neurotheology[edit] During the 1980s he stimulated people's temporal lobes artificially with a weak magnetic field to see if he could induce a religious state (see God helmet). Tectonic Strain Theory[edit] Books[edit]

Entheogen A group of peyotes, in cultivation. Peyote has been used in ritual contexts for thousands of years.[1][2][3] With the advent of organic chemistry, there now exist many synthetic drugs with similar psychoactive properties, many derived from these plants. Many pure active compounds with psychoactive properties have been isolated from these organisms and chemically synthesized, including mescaline, psilocybin, DMT, salvinorin A, ibogaine, ergine, and muscimol, respectively. Etymology[edit] The neologism entheogen was coined in 1979 by a group of ethnobotanists and scholars of mythology (Carl A. Entheogen was coined as a replacement for the terms hallucinogen and psychedelic. Ruck et al. argued that the term hallucinogen was inappropriate owing to its etymological relationship to words relating to delirium and insanity. Entheogens[edit] Species[edit] High caffeine consumption has been linked to an increase in the likelihood of experiencing auditory hallucinations. Chemicals[edit] L. Osiris Other

Jeremy Narby Jeremy Narby (born 1959) is an anthropologist and writer. Narby grew up in Canada and Switzerland, studied history at the University of Canterbury, and received a doctorate in anthropology from Stanford University. Narby spent several years living with the Ashaninca in the Peruvian Amazon cataloging indigenous uses of rainforest resources to help combat ecological destruction. Books[edit] External links[edit] "The Cosmic Serpent" an interview in ascent magazine.

Dr Andrija Puharich, Official website

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