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Knitting Patterns - Chic Knits FALL 2010 - Designed by Bonne Marie Burns

Knitting Patterns - Chic Knits FALL 2010 - Designed by Bonne Marie Burns
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Knitting Design for Beginners: Designing Knitwear Patterns; Getting Started. Once you can knit, there is nothing to stop you from designing your own simply shaped garments. This is the first part of a series of articles which will show you how. Knitting is maths; knitwear design even more so. This is a thought that often scares people, but nobody who knits need be afraid of the numbers, as all knitters are already counting and measuring as they go. The mathematical side doesn’t have to be difficult or complex, but it is vital. Designing your own patterns is straightforward and satisfying. Equipment Knitting needles (of course)Yarn – do you have enough? A quick way to compare yarn weights is to check their “wraps per inch” (wpi). Other essentials Tape measurePinsCalculator (unless your mental arithmetic is exceptional)Notepad and pen to mark down your measurements, and write your design. Useful to have Graph paper (you can make your own using this link). Working your swatch: Select your yarn and needles and knit a swatch.

Home Page - Knitting Yarns | Knitting Accessories - Stash Fine Yarns. Kaffe Fassett Studio : Welcome Weaving in Ends I have some good news. And, I have some bad news. Good news first: there is no one right way to weave in your ends. So, chances are, you haven’t been doing it wrong! Having options, it’s a blessing and a curse. Some of our most seasoned customers would come in to find a knitting newbie at the communal table, finishing up a project in some newfangled kind of way. The perhaps unsettling truth is that there is probably another way to do whatever it is you are doing. Stockinette Weaving in Ends with Duplicate Stitch (on the ‘Right Side’) Weaving your ends using the duplicate stitch method means you will sew along your fabric, following the path of the stitched yarn. With your tapestry needle threaded, bring your needle from the back or ‘wrong side’ of the fabric to the front or ‘right side’ of your fabric at the base of the nearest ‘V’ created by the knit stitches. Next, insert the needle back into the bottom of the ‘V’, the same place where you began. Weaving in Ends on the Vertical Garter Rib

Wool & Tea: Designers Tzuri Gueta is a innovator in technologies for textiles. Having consulted for Armani, Dior, Mugler, and Gaultier, he has launched his own collection of accessories incorporating lace and silicon, and laser cut textiles. Cast On: Provisional A provisional cast-on keeps cast-on stitches "live" so that they can be knit later. It's a very useful technique when you're not sure what kind of edging you'll want or how long to make something. With a provisional cast-on, you can make these decisions at the end of a project, allowing you to respond to the actual garment. I made this tutorial to go with my 70's Ski Hat Project Journal, the provisional cast-on is used to make a cashmere lining for the hat. There are a few ways to make a provisional cast-on. With some smooth waste yarn and a crochet hook, chain a few more stitches than you will be casting on. Examining the chain, the front side is made up of V's. The back of the chain has bumps in it. Insert a knitting needle into each bump on the back of the chain, and using the yarn you are knitting with, pick up however many stitches you're casting on. Then just knit! When you're ready to use the cast on stitches, thread a knitting needle through the right side of each stitch.

Sideways Edge Cast-On, a knitting unvention! plus, Swerve! So I just released a new pattern (Swerve!) and you’ll notice how the cuffs and hands are knit in opposite directions (or, perpendicular directions really) – but hey guess what! There’s no picking up stitches and no seaming! The method – which has existed, of course, as all knitterly things have, and I have just unvented, as the great Elizabeth Zimmermann liked to say – I am calling the sideways edge cast-on, because edges (cuffs, brims, etc) are what I’ve been using it for and what it seems great for. My how-to, notes, etc in this post can be used by designers, of course, but I think it spreads further than that – if you are a knitter who hates picking up stitches, you can take any pattern that involves a sideways brim/cuff/etc and calls for picking up the stitches, and convert it to a sideways edge cast-on instead! Below is an example of a version of the method having been worked as a hat brim. Now, what was up with that “ratio of stitches to rows” issue mentioned above?

BACK to the back join The back join (subject of a previous post) is a method for working in the tails AS YOU GO in multi-color knitting. The back join is NOT confusing, but judging from the e-mails in the TECHknitting in-box, the first post about it WAS confusing. It would be a pity to obscure such a useful technique with badly-written instructions, so here's another run at it--with an additional illustration showing the back join as it is being knitted. The back join (one more time) The back join is usually used in circular knitting (around and around) because back-and forth knitters usually change at the fabric edge. So, suppose you are knitting around and around on circular needles in LAVENDER and you want to switch to PURPLE. 1) (above) Begin the back join by knitting to the last LAVENDER stitch. 2) (above) Once you have this spot marked, UNRAVEL the last three stitches you have knit, and RETURN the unraveled stitches to the LEFT NEEDLE. I apologize to those of you I confused the first time.

How to Cable Without a Cable Needle | Lion Brand Notebook - StumbleUpon November 7th, 2011 by Jess Now that you’ve learned to use a cable needle, what do you do if you want to start a cabled project and don’t have a cable needle on hand? Don’t fret; you can cross your stitches without using a separate needle! Here’s how to do it. Now, a few notes on this technique. Cabling without a cable needle works best on smaller cables.

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