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Burberry uses first ever Snapcode to let in-store customers unlock online Sna...

Burberry uses first ever Snapcode to let in-store customers unlock online Sna...
The Snapcode allows in-store shoppers to scan a barcode using their mobile device to unlock content from Burberry’s new campaign for male fragrance Mr Burberry. Burberry is running the content on Snapchat’s Discover channel, offering access to style and fragrance content, including tailoring and grooming tips. The channel will also feature the full-length director’s cut and behind-the-scenes content from the campaign. The content will be available for two months. READ MORE: Burberry in Snapchat first as it premieres new fashion collection online Launching today (4 April) and directed by Oscar-winner Steve McQueen, the ad tells the story of a couple madly in love. From 25 April, there will be scent-dispensing posters in Knightsbridge, London, which will spray the fragrance directly onto the user’s wrist when inserted underneath the sensor. Customers are able to personalise their Mr. This is not the first time that the brand has used Snapchat and personalisation to engage consumers.

https://www.marketingweek.com/2016/04/04/burberry-uses-first-ever-snapcode-to-let-in-store-customers-unlock-online-snapchat-content/

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