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Social Development Theory (Vygotsky

Social Development Theory (Vygotsky
Summary: Social Development Theory argues that social interaction precedes development; consciousness and cognition are the end product of socialization and social behavior. Originator: Lev Vygotsky (1896-1934). Key terms: Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD), More Knowledgeable Other (MKO) Vygotsky’s Social Development Theory Vygotsky’s Social Development Theory is the work of Russian psychologist Lev Vygotsky (1896-1934), who lived during Russian Revolution. Vygotsky’s work was largely unkown to the West until it was published in 1962. Vygotsky’s theory is one of the foundations of constructivism. Major themes: Social interaction plays a fundamental role in the process of cognitive development. Vygotsky focused on the connections between people and the sociocultural context in which they act and interact in shared experiences (Crawford, 1996). Applications of the Vygotsky’s Social Development Theory For more information, see: Luis C.

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Lev Vygotsky Lev Semyonovich Vygotsky (Russian: Лев Семёнович Вы́готский or Выго́тский, born Лев Симхович Выгодский (Lev Simkhovich Vygodsky), November 17 [O.S. November 5] 1896 – June 11, 1934) was a Soviet psychologist, the founder of cultural-historical psychology, and the leader of the Vygotsky Circle. In the early 1920s, his birth name was changed from Vygodskii (with "d") into Vygotskii (with middle "t"). Lev Vygotsky was born in Orsha, Byelorussia, in the Russian Empire (present-day Belarus) into a nonreligious Jewish family. He was raised in the city of Gomel, where he obtained both public and private education. He was influenced by his cousin, David Vygodsky.

Educational Psychology Review, Volume 3, Number 3 Dual coding theory (DCT) explains human behavior and experience in terms of dynamic associative processes that operate on a rich network of modality-specific verbal and nonverbal (or imagery) representations. We first describe the underlying premises of the theory and then show how the basic DCT mechanisms can be used to model diverse educational phenomena. The research demonstrates that concreteness, imagery, and verbal associative processes play major roles in various educational domains: the representation and comprehension of knowledge, learning and memory of school material, effective instruction, individual differences, achievement motivation and test anxiety, and the learning of motor skills. DCT also has important implications for the science and practice of educational psychology — specifically, for educational research and teacher education.

Connectivism: Learning theory of the future or vestige of the past? Rita KopUniversity of Wales Swansea Adrian HillOpen School BC, Canada Abstract Zone of proximal development In the middle circle, representing the zone of proximal development, students cannot complete tasks unaided, but can complete them with guidance. The zone of proximal development, often abbreviated as ZPD, is the difference between what a learner can do without help and what he or she can do with help.[1] It is a concept introduced, yet not fully developed, by Soviet psychologist Lev Vygotsky (1896–1934) during the last ten years of his life.[2] Vygotsky stated that a child follows an adult's example and gradually develops the ability to do certain tasks without help.[3] Vygotsky and some educators believe that education's role is to give children experiences that are within their zones of proximal development, thereby encouraging and advancing their individual learning.[4] Origins[edit] The concept of the zone of proximal development was originally developed by Vygotsky to argue against the use of academic, knowledge-based tests as a means to gauge students' intelligence.

B. F. Skinner Burrhus Frederic (B. F.) Skinner (March 20, 1904 – August 18, 1990) was an American psychologist, behaviorist, author, inventor, and social philosopher.[1][2][3][4] He was the Edgar Pierce Professor of Psychology at Harvard University from 1958 until his retirement in 1974.[5] Skinner invented the operant conditioning chamber, also known as the Skinner Box.[6] He was a firm believer of the idea that human free will was actually an illusion and any human action was the result of the consequences of that same action. If the consequences were bad, there was a high chance that the action would not be repeated; however if the consequences were good, the actions that led to it would be reinforced.[7] He called this the principle of reinforcement.[8]

Education-2020 - Connectivism Skip to main content Create interactive lessons using any digital content including wikis with our free sister product TES Teach. Get it on the web or iPad! Classroom Applications of Vygotsky's Theory Ch. 2, p. 47 Classroom Applications of Vygotsky’s Theory Vygotsky’s concept of the zone of proximal development is based on the idea that development is defined both by what a child can do independently and by what the child can do when assisted by an adult or more competent peer (Daniels, 1995; Wertsch, 1991). Knowing both levels of Vygotsky’s zone is useful for teachers, for these levels indicate where the child is at a given moment as well as where the child is going. The zone of proximal development has several implications for teaching in the classroom. According to Vygotsky, for the curriculum to be developmentally appropriate, the teacher must plan activities that encompass not only what children are capable of doing on their own but what they can learn with the help of others (Karpov & Haywood, 1998).

learning, networks, knowledge, technology, community The Learning Analytics and Knowledge conference (LAK16) is happening this week in Edinburgh. I unfortunately, due to existing travel and other commitments, am not in attendance. I have great hope for the learning analytics field as one that will provide significant research for learning and help us move past naive quantitative and qualitative assessments of research and knowledge. I see LA as a bricolage of skills, techniques, and academic/practitioner domains.

key to learning Viva Vygotsky! Freedom of Thought Galina Doyla & Sue Palmer He lived for only 38 years, but in his last decade (1924-1934), the Russian thinker Lev Vygotsky transformed the study of developmental psychology. Cooperative Learning Strategies and Children ERIC Identifier: ED306003 Publication Date: 1988-00-00 Author: Lyman, Lawrence - Foyle, Harvey C. Source: ERIC Clearinghouse on Elementary and Early Childhood Education Urbana IL. Cooperative learning is a teaching strategy involving children's participation in small group learning activities that promote positive interaction. This digest discusses the reasons for using cooperative learning in centers and classrooms, ways to implement the strategy, and the long-term benefits for children's education. Cooperative learning promotes academic achievement, is relatively easy to implement, and is not expensive.

MOOCs and More: Connectivism Connectivism Knowledge is distributed across a network of connections thus learning consists of the ability to construct and traverse those networks.Knowledge is not acquired, it is a set of connections formed by actions and experiences. These connections are formed naturally, through a process of association and not through some intentional act. Therefore, in connectivism one does not transfer, make or build knowledge. Instead, connectivisim is focused on partaking in activities to learn by growing or developing ourselves and our society in connected ways.

§14. The problem of the environment by Vygotsky Vygotsky 1934 §14. The problem of the environment Source: The Vygotsky Reader, pp. 338-354, ed. Jan05_01 Editor’s Note: This is a milestone article that deserves careful study. Connectivism should not be con fused with constructivism. George Siemens advances a theory of learning that is consistent with the needs of the twenty first century. His theory takes into account trends in learning, the use of technology and networks, and the diminishing half-life of knowledge. It combines relevant elements of many learning theories, social structures, and technology to create a powerful theoretical construct for learning in the digital age.

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