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$15 Earth Berm Eco House Filmed 30 Years Later

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$50 And Up Underground House – Underground Housing & Shelter Earthship Un article de Ékopédia, l'encyclopédie pratique. Les Earthships (ou Vaisseaux terrestres) sont des habitations inventées par l'architecte américain Mickael Reynolds dans les années 70 avec comme perspective de créer des habitations totalement autonomes à moindre coût. Exemple de construction Earthship autonome Pour atteindre ses objectifs, Mickael Reynolds s'est basé sur : la récupération de matériaux (pneus usés, des canettes, des bouteilles en verre, chutes de bois...), la production d'énergie à l'aide de panneaux solaires, d'éoliennes ou d'autres sources d'énergies renouvelables, une orientation au sud, une construction de mur isolante massive, la récupération et l'épuration des eaux de pluie. Le but ultime des Earthships étant l'auto-suffisance, on peut également trouver des toilettes sèches, et autres installations, afin de recycler les déchets humains pour rendre le raccordement aux égouts inutiles. Concept Le concept de l'Earthship est donc basé sur trois idées: Module-U Module Serre

Alternative Energy | Home Solar Power Systems | Energy Scavenging | Solar LED Lighting | Solar Powered Telemetry | Solar Tracking System | Wind Turbine Pitch Control | Newark.com There are many viable reasons for considering an alternative energy solution to power new designs, especially for those with ultra-low power requirements. Lower total cost of ownership, environmental benefits, and ease of implementation are just some of the many benefits that alternative energy sources can bring. A solar-powered home is probably the most economical and practical use for an alternative energy at this point in time. Small scale wind power generation schemes have been used for household electricity generation in conjunction with battery storage over many decades, especially in remote areas. It is easy to think of all alternative energy as giant wind farms or hydro plants, but many alternative energy sources can be as simple as a single solar cell powering a remote sensor and wireless transmitter.

Man Builds Fairy Tale Home for His Family – For Only £3,000 Simon Dale is a family man in Wales, the western part of Great Britain. His interest in self-sustainability and an ecological awareness led him to dig out and build his own home—one of the loveliest, warmest, most inviting dwellings you could ever imagine. And it cost him only £3,000, about $4,700 American dollars! Can you imagine a more charming entrance than this? Simon gives two reasons for building the home. It’s fun. His second reason is a plea for sustainability, in which he states that “our supplies are dwindling and our planet is in ecological catastrophe”. Simon is also a photographer, and as you can see throughout this article, a talented one. The tools are fairly simple. The home is constructed from wood, stone, straw, and has a sod roof. Most amazingly, the home didn’t require years of training or experience. He was fortunate in obtaining the land for his home. This building is one part of a low-impact or permaculture approach to life.

Malawi, Africa – Join Us! The Malawi flower has happened. Three rooms, two toilets, and a shower are built. We want to thank the local people of Kapita who made all of us feel at home while we worked with them. We want to thank the student soldiers who helped to both finance and build this project. We want to thank Empower Malawi for facilitating the initial beginnings of this project. We want to thank the many who donated and are still donating funds toward this project. We are hoping that the local people of Kapita can finish this flower just as the people of Sierra Leone finished theirs. Thank you all michael reynolds photo by Frederica Miglio and Alessandro Turci photos by Frederica Miglio and Alessandro Turci Being Somewhere - Low Impact Living

Earthship Project - Guatemala The Earthship crew has completed the 3-week build that donated a home to a family in Comalapa, Guatemala for the second time around. Working with Long Way Home, a non-profit organization in Comalapa working to build sustainable schools, we were able to raise the appropriate amount of money as well as gather volunteers and organize to allow this project to take place. We are thankful for all who participated and donated to this project. The 3-U Survival Pod for Romeo Apen and his family has been enclosed with power and water systems in place. The last two days on the job site were spent finishing the plasterwork, planting and fine-tuning the systems so that Romeo can work on his own finishes unique to his liking. A final Q&A session was held by Phil Basehart, the project director, which included all of our volunteers as well as the crew of Long Way Home who with the help of a volunteer translator, were able to ask about the building and the principles of Earthships. Comments comments

Glenn's Underground Cob House Well, maybe not so simple... An older interior shot with a bit of a Montana Lodge flavor. Here's the big family room where up to 30 people can gather. Ancient iron roofing panels were reclaimed as a wall finish and room divider. "The walls in the great room were stick framed with reject 2x4s and then covered with salvaged plywood from fruit bins. Next the walls were paneled with corrugated sheeting rescued from a burned out old gold mine mill, giving it that ancient 'out of our price range restaurant' look that custom commercial builders strive for today." The floor has its own interesting history. "In the kitchen we partially solved that problem with the torn paper bag floor sealed and glued with layers of waterbase polyurethane. "We have finally settled on the CBRI light duty concrete floor designed in India and brought to our attention in Ken Kern's book, 'The Owner Built Home'. "Variations of it that I have designed can be used over nearly any surface.

Earth Sheltered Homes Earth Sheltered Homes "Another type of building is emerging: one that actually heals the scars of its own construction. It conserves rainwater and fuel and it provides a habitat for creatures other than the human one. The earth sheltered house uses the ground as insulating blanket which effectively protects it from temperature extremes, wind, rain and extreme weather events. Fifteen feet below ground the soil maintains a fairly constant temperature equal to the annual average temperature of the area's surface air. There are two types of earth sheltered building. Honingham Earth Sheltered Social Housing. Looks like vertical placed logs are helping to support the berm on the right. Earth sheltered home with conventional facade. Earth sheltered home, as above. The facade may accommodate any architectural styling of the home owners choosing. This earth sheltered house, in the wilds of the Outer Hebrides, provides a perfect living environment for harsh weather. Earth bermed home. Resources:

Glenn's Underground Cabin Update I received an e-mail from Becky Bee this morning and sent her a reply about keeping dry in the underground cabin. Becky is the author of "The Cob builders Handbook" and in my opinion a foremost authority on building with cob. A link to her site follows the copy of the reply. ----- Original Message ----- From: Bex To: glenn kangiser Sent: Sunday, February 20, 2005 9:29 AMSubject: Re: ref books I looked at your pictures this am! Beautiful! Becky Bee GroundworksPO Box 381Murphy, Oregon 97533USA cobalot@cpros.com Hi Becky, I built using the methods in Mike Oehler's "$50 and Up Underground House" book. Glenn For a lot of interesting information on cob, her cob books, and lots of cool pictures go to Becky's site.

Earthship South and East view of an Earthship passive solar home Earthship typical floorplan Earthships are primarily designed to work as autonomous buildings using thermal mass construction and natural cross ventilation assisted by thermal draught (Stack effect) to regulate indoor temperature. Earthships are generally off-the-grid homes, minimizing their reliance on public utilities and fossil fuels. Earthships are built to utilize the available local resources, especially energy from the sun. For example, windows on sun-facing walls admit lighting and heating, and the buildings are often horseshoe-shaped to maximize natural light and solar-gain during winter months. History[edit] Michael Reynolds' first building, the Thumb House. A building being built of cans in the 1970s The design used with most earthships. Eventually, Reynolds' vision took the form of the common U-shaped earth-filled tire homes seen today. Systems[edit] Water[edit] Collection[edit] A domestic rainwater harvesting system

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