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The Focusing Institute

The Focusing Institute
Focusing shows how to pause the on-going situation and create a space for new possibilities for carrying forward. This practice, developed from the Philosophy of the Implicit, shows how to apply open attention to something which is directly experienced but is not in words. Your body knows more about situations than you are explicitly aware of. For example, your body picks up more about another person than you consciously know. With a little training, you can get a bodily feel for the 'more' that is happening in any situation. From that bodily feel come small steps that lead toward resolution.

http://www.focusing.org/

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Focus: Single-Tasking and Productivity, by Leo Babauta ‘Concentrate all your thoughts upon the work at hand. The sun’s rays do not burn until brought to a focus.’ ~Alexander Graham Bell Many of us grew up in the age of multi-tasking, where you couldn’t call yourself productive if you weren’t a good multi-tasker. We learned to always have several balls in the air at once — while writing something on the computer, we had a phone call going, we were writing something on a notepad or paper form, we were reviewing documents, sometimes even holding a meeting at the same time. That’s the productive worker, the effective executive.

Getting Started with Todoist Projects help you organize your tasks into separate lists. Your Todoist comes with a list of standard projects to get you started, but you can create, delete, re-name, re-arrange, and color-code your projects any way you like. Creating new projects Most users find it helpful to separate their tasks into broad projects like and . Then they create new Todoist projects for bigger, long-term things they’re working on.

How to Focus and Get a Felt Sense: 12 Steps Edit Article Focusing is a mode of inward bodily attention that most people don’t know about yet. It was first developed in 1960-early 70s by Eugene Gendlin and others in Chicago, following on work with Carl Rogers and Richard McKeon. Most of the information here is a mash-up of the Focusing Institute's materials (www.focusing.org) based on users' experiences since then. Focusing is more than being in touch with your feelings and different from body work. Focusing occurs exactly at the interface of body-mind.

The ONE Thing: How to Get Things Done Using The Focusing Question Source: PicJumbo. On June 23, 1885, Andrew Carnegie stood before a room of wide-eyed students at Curry Commercial College and addressed the audience. “‘Don’t put all your eggs in one basket’ is all wrong” he said. [1] Carnegie, then 49 years old, was at his peak of success: his company, the Carnegie Steel Company, was the largest and most profitable company in the world. “I tell you ‘put all your eggs in one basket, and then watch that basket’” counselled Carnegie, “Look round you and take notice; men who do that do not often fail”.

Curiosity Is as Important as Intelligence - Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic by Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic | 11:00 AM August 27, 2014 There seems to be wide support for the idea that we are living in an “age of complexity”, which implies that the world has never been more intricate. This idea is based on the rapid pace of technological changes, and the vast amount of information that we are generating (the two are related). Yet consider that philosophers like Leibniz (17th century) and Diderot (18th century) were already complaining about information overload. The “horrible mass of books” they referred to may have represented only a tiny portion of what we know today, but much of what we know today will be equally insignificant to future generations.

Six Steps (en) Introduction Most people find it easier to learn focusing through individual instruction than through simply reading about it. The actual process of focusing, experienced from the inside, is fluid and open, allowing great room for individual differences and ways of working. Yet to introduce the concepts and flavor of the technique, some structure can be useful. The Psychology of Flow What is it like to be fully alive, right now, engaged with what you are doing? That’s the psychology of flow. When the happiness and creativity expert Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi was studying how painters work, he noticed an odd thing.

Two Keys for Regulating Your Breathing and Circulating Qi The keys to regulating the breathing and transporting Qi (energy) are in two places: the Huiyin cavity located between the genitals and anus, and the palate of the mouth. The Huiyin cavity is the connecting point of the four Yin Qi vessels and is the controlling and releasing gate for the four Yin Qi reservoirs. When the Huiyin is pushed out, the Qi in the Yin vessels is released and when the Huiyin is lifted upward, the Qi in the Yin vessels is contained and condensed. For example, when you laugh out loud, your exhalation is longer than your inhalation, and when you exhale, the Huiyin is pushed out naturally, the entire body’s Yang is manifested and the Guardian Qi is strengthened; consequently, the body gets warmer and begins to sweat.

Super-Focus: 10 Natural Steps to Nurture Your Attention How to deal with interruptions, structure your environment, enter a flow state and much more… “Pay attention. It’s all about paying attention. Attention is vitality. It connects you with others. It makes you eager. Talent Psychology Consulting Ltd. » What is Talent Psychology? Talent psychology is the combined study of high potential and leadership toward the application of this new body of knowledge to talent management, organizational development, workplace dynamics, and career advancement. Dr. Mary Jacobsen is considered by many to be the foremost international expert on gifted/talented adults, and has been providing groundbreaking insights and research on high potential since 1998. In particular, she investigates the relationship between high ability and effective leadership.

Blue Mountain Center of Meditation & Nilgiri Press | Home| Thought for the Day “We all need joy, and we can all receive joy in only one way, by adding to the joy of others.” EKNATH EASWARAN(1910–1999)

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