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Getting screws to hold in end grain

Getting screws to hold in end grain
Because wood is relatively weak perpendicular to its grain, screws don't hold that well when screwed into the end grain. This firstly because the thread has a harder time cutting into the grain fro the side, and also because what it does grab shears out more easily, as the shear is cross-grain. Wood screws do, however, hold extremely well in cross grain. So the trick to making screws really hold in the end of a piece of wood is to give them a bit of cross-grained wood to bite into. The easiest way to do this is to put a hardwood plug into the wood, 5/8" or 3/4" in diameter. The illustration at left shows how far the screw would penetrate, if it was actually in the wood. This approach is much cheaper, and probably stronger, than using some specialized fastener using a machine screw and some sort of specialized nut to insert in a hole. I use this apporach for screwing bed rail clips into the ends of bed rails for my bed frame and my daybed, where good hold is very important. Related:  techniquesTravails Bois

How To Make Mission Furniture Part (1) 1 Copyrighted, 1909, by H.H. WINDSOR Suitable for Dining Room Use Details of Chair Construction A mission chair suitable for the dining room can be made from any one of the furniture woods to match the other articles of furniture. This book is one of the series of Handbooks on industrial subjects being published by the Popular Mechanics Company. CNC Panel Joinery Notebook I’ve been collecting clever ways of slotting flat stock together since I first read Nomadic Furniture back in 1999, well before the advent of the accessible hobby-class CNC tools that, today, make manufacturing parts like these pretty easy. Now, the world is full of people designing models, project enclosures, sculpture, furniture, and all kinds of other cool stuff to be assembled from parts made on laser cutters and CNC routers, and I keep expecting a definitive book or website to emerge that covers the “bag of tricks” in an organized way. So far, I haven’t found it. I may have missed it. Or maybe this article can serve as a jumping-off point. In presenting this material, I want to first acknowledge my respect for the world’s established and ancient traditions of joinery. I may abuse some terms, without meaning to, and I am glad to be corrected by those who are in the know about traditional joinery. To simplify things, at first, I’m only considering joints between two panels. Biasing

AW Extras 4/17/14 - Simple Kitchen Upgrades - Woodworking Projects Pull-Out Trash Drawer Whoever decreed that the trash can goes under the sink got it wrong.With plumbing in the way,there’s no space for a good-size can. Plus who likes to bend over and reach into the cabinet? Here’s a great alternative: In one cabinet,replace the shelves with a simple trash can holder mounted on drawer slides.By attaching the existing cabinet door to the front of the pull-out unit,you create a convenient trash drawer. Fig.C and the photos at right show how to build the unit. Melamine board—particleboard with a tough plastic coating—is a good material for this project because it’s easy to clean.A 4x8 sheet costs about $25 at home centers.The melamine coating,however, tends to chip during cutting.This chipping is worst where the saw teeth exit the material. You’ll also need iron-on edge banding ($6 at home centers) to cover the exposed edges (Photo 2). Use the same drawer slides you used for the drawers. Sources Woodworker’s Hardware, wwhardware.com, 800-383-0130. Fig. 1.

Repaint your kitchen cabinets without stripping or sanding, with... Disclosure: Rust-Oleum paid for my transportation, lodging and food to attend this special event in New Orleans, where I could test this new product and hear directly from their company experts. There was no promise of news coverage. Opinions are my own. Repainting your kitchen cabinets has historically been one of the most thankless home renovation projects. Last week, I was one of 10 home renovation and design bloggers invited by Rustoleum to see and experience this new product. Another benefit of Rustoleum’s new system is that everything you need comes in one kit, except for brushes and gloves. 5 steps to repaint your kitchen cabinets Step #1 is to use their special solution to clean the cabinets. Steps #2 and #3 — Paint the kitchen cabinets using the tinted “bond coat” paint provided. Step #4 — Optional — Add glaze, also provided. Step #5 — Apply clear top coat (oopsy, no photo)…. and you’re done and ready to reinstall your doors. Where to buy Rustoleum Cabinet Transformations Pricing:

Metal fabrication Metal fabrication is the building of metal structures by cutting, bending, and assembling processes: Fabrication comprises or overlaps with various metalworking specialties: Fabrication shops and machine shops have overlapping capabilities, but fabrication shops generally concentrate on metal preparation and assembly as described above. [edit] Metal fabrication is a value added process that involves the construction of machines and structures from various raw materials. Fabrication shops are employed by contractors, OEMs and VARs. Raw materials[edit] Standard raw materials used by metal fabricators are; Cutting and burning[edit] The raw material has to be cut to size. Special band saws designed for cutting metal have hardened blades and a feed mechanism for even cutting. Burn tables are CNC cutting torches, usually natural gas powered. Forming[edit] Machining[edit] Welding[edit] Special precautions may be needed to prevent warping of the weldment due to heat. Final assembly[edit] See also[edit]

A Place to Call ‘Hone’ When I think of all the things that improved my sharpening skills, two things loom large. No. 1 is practice, of course, but close behind that is a dedicated sharpening tray. About 14 years ago I built a shallow tray from scrap plywood, nails and glue. No fancy joinery, no water-resistant materials and no finish. The tray sat beside my bench and contained all my sharpening mess, keeping it off my workbench and project parts. Once I had the tray in place, a funny thing happened. My tools stayed sharper. I left that wooden sharpening tray behind when I left Popular Woodworking Magazine in 2011 (it was, after all, the magazine’s scrap plywood). It’s almost as good as my sharpening tray from my days in the magazine. I am such an advocate of a sharpening station that I set one up wherever I teach. This simple tray is, in my opinion, more important than what sort of sharpening media you select. — Christopher Schwarz

Template Cutting with a Jig Saw & Woodsmith Tips It’s much easier to rough cut large pieces using a jig saw. The trouble is trying to stay close to the layout lines. To make things a little easier, I came up with a way to guide the saw along a template (photo below). The guide is nothing more than a ¼" plywood base with narrow sides that cradle the saw foot. (It’s held in place with carpet tape.) To use the guide, I steer the jig saw with one hand and place the other hand on the base to keep the guide pin in contact with the template.

Adding a Hidden Compartment - Woodworking Project Adding a Hidden Compartment The current issue of Woodsmith (No. 127) features a drawer with a hidden compartment that's built into the back of the drawer. But there's more than one way to do this. In fact, adding a hidden compartment is a lot easier than you might think. A while back when I was working on some pigeon hole dividers for a desk, I added a simple hidden compartment behind one of the drawers, see photo. This hidden compartment (really just a "stubby" drawer) fits the opening exactly, so you can't see any gaps around the edges. To open the compartment, you have to know exactly where to push. There's really nothing difficult about building the compart- ment, but there are a couple of things to keep in mind. First of all, this won't work in every situation. And when building the compartment, it's best to start with the front piece, see Fig. 2. Have a great weekend, Jon Garbison Online Editor, Woodsmith

Kubb Kubbspel Contruction Game Plans - How to make Pictured in the table above are the four types of wooden pieces you will need to play Kubb. Kubb is played with one king, ten kubbs, six throwing batons ( dowels ) and four markers. Some Tips, Before You Get Started Use a hard wood. The kubbs and batons ( dowels ) get knocked around a lot. The King The King is 4x4x16 inches. 4x4 is a standard size for wood and can be found at most hardware stores. You can go as simple or elegant as you wish with this part. The Kubbs The Kubbs are 3x3x8 inches. The Throwing Batons ( dowels ) The batons are 1.75 inches in diameter and 12 inches long. The Markers The markers are just sticks of wood that you will be driving into the ground. Round off all the edges of your parts to reduce the possibility of slivers and enhance their appearance.

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