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One Hundred Interesting Mathematical Calculations, Number 7: Archive Entry From Brad DeLong's Webjournal

One Hundred Interesting Mathematical Calculations, Number 7 One Hundred Interesting Mathematical Calculations, Number 7: Julius Caesar's Last Breath What's the chance that the breath you just inhaled contains at least one air molecule that was in Julius Caesar's last breath--the one in which he said (according to Shakespeare) " Et tu Brute ? Then die Caesar"? Assume that the more than two thousand years that have passed have been enough time for all the molecules in Caesar's last breath to mix evenly in the atmosphere, and that only a trivial amount of the molecules have leaked out into the oceans or the ground. Assume further that there are about 10 44 molecules of air, and about 2 x 10 22 molecules in each breath--yours or Caesar's. That gives a chance of 2 x 10 22 /10 44 = 2x 10 -22 that any one particular molecule you breathe in came from Caesar's last breath. [1-2x10 -22 ] [2x10^22] How to evaluate this? [e [-2x10^(-22)] ] [2x10^(22)] From John Allen Paulos's Innumeracy .

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Top five regrets of the dying There was no mention of more sex or bungee jumps. A palliative nurse who has counselled the dying in their last days has revealed the most common regrets we have at the end of our lives. And among the top, from men in particular, is 'I wish I hadn't worked so hard'. Bronnie Ware is an Australian nurse who spent several years working in palliative care, caring for patients in the last 12 weeks of their lives. She recorded their dying epiphanies in a blog called Inspiration and Chai, which gathered so much attention that she put her observations into a book called The Top Five Regrets of the Dying. One Hundred Interesting Mathematical Calculations, Number 9: Archive Entry From Brad DeLong's Webjournal One Hundred Interesting Mathematical Calculations, Number 9 One Hundred Interesting Mathematical Calculations, Number 9: False Positives Suppose that we have a test for a disease that is 98% accurate: if one has the disease, the test comes back "yes" 98% of the time (and "no" 2% of the time), and if one does not have the disease, the test comes back "no" 98% of the time (and "yes" 2% of the time).

"Quantum Physics, Consciousness, Creativity, and Healing" with Amit Goswami (part 1 of 3) Visionary: Amit Goswami Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 In this 3-part audio presentation, Dr. Goswami provides a lucid explanation of three fundamental principals of quantum physics, laying the groundwork for a mind-expanding look at how they relate to consciousness, creativity, and healing. With clear definitions he contrasts the quantum principals with traditional scientific beliefs, and then provides examples from research and human experience to demonstrate their veracity.

Four Elements Presentation (Master’s Defense) — It's Elemental The following presentation was made literally thirty minutes before my Master’s thesis defense, when I thought to myself, hey, I should put together some slides! Luckily I had everything I needed already… you’ll have to imagine how I skilfully (ahem…) wove all the slides into a seamless tapestry. Tagged as: four elements, Master S Thesis, Master Thesis, Powerpoint, Presentation, Presentation Ppt, Slides, Tapestry, Thesis Defense, Thesis Presentation Ten Fun Facts Of The Week ← Previous Post Next Post → Ten Fun Facts Of The Week Aether (classical element) According to ancient and medieval science, aether (Greek: αἰθήρ aithēr[1]), also spelled æther or ether, also called quintessence, is the material that fills the region of the universe above the terrestrial sphere.[citation needed] The concept of aether was used in several theories to explain several natural phenomena, such as the traveling of light and gravity. In the late 19th century, physicists postulated that aether permeated all throughout space, providing a medium through which light could travel in a vacuum, but evidence for the presence of such a medium was not found in the Michelson–Morley experiment.[2] Medieval concept of the cosmos.

8 Things Everybody Ought to Know About Concentrating “Music helps me concentrate,” Mike said to me glancing briefly over his shoulder. Mike was in his room writing a paper for his U.S. History class. On his desk next to his computer sat crunched Red Bulls, empty Gatorade bottles, some extra pocket change and scattered pieces of paper. In the pocket of his sweat pants rested a blaring iPod with a chord that dangled near the floor, almost touching against his Adidas sandals. On his computer sat even more stray objects than his surrounding environment.

HOLOS GLOBAL SYSTEM Being in itself is the force. The action of being is the manifestation of its force. The force depends on the form while the aim of the action is an even greater force. Action in itself liberates the force. How to Disagree March 2008 The web is turning writing into a conversation. Twenty years ago, writers wrote and readers read. The web lets readers respond, and increasingly they do—in comment threads, on forums, and in their own blog posts. Many who respond to something disagree with it. That's to be expected.

Aura (paranormal) The Human Aura in a healthy woman after a diagram by Walter John Kilner (1847-1920). The picture depicts Kilner's "inner and outer auras." Colours have been added for illustrative purposes and have no other significance. An old Iranian Shi'a Muslim impression of Jesus and Mary shows an aura after the style of the farr In Iran the aura is known as farr or "glory": it is depicted in association with Zoroastrian kings.[10] Industry veteran: LimeWire pirates were iTunes’ best customers Internet pirates are always portrayed as parasitic freeloaders responsible for countless instances of DRM, the "death" of PC gaming, ISP bandwidth caps and more, but according to one industry veteran, that's entirely unfair. During a keynote speech at CA Expo in Sydney, former Google CIO and EMI executive Douglas C. Merrill said that he believes filesharers shouldn't be punished for downloading copyrighted material because it often drives them to make legitimate purchases. While employed by EMI (one of the world's largest music labels and an RIAA member), Merrill supposedly profiled LimeWire users and discovered that they were actually some of the biggest spenders on iTunes. "That's not theft, that's try-before-you-buy marketing and we weren't even paying for it… so it makes sense to sue them," Merrill said sarcastically. In an amusing analogy, he said that suing people for filesharing "is like trying to sell soap by throwing dirt on your customers."

Chakra From an 1899 Yoga manuscript in the Braj Bhasa language. Their name derives from the Sanskrit word for "wheel" or "turning", but in the yogic context a better translation of the word is 'vortex or whirlpool'.[1][note 1] The concept of chakra features in tantric and yogic traditions of Hinduism and Buddhism. Etymology[edit]

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