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One Hundred Interesting Mathematical Calculations, Number 7: Archive Entry From Brad DeLong's Webjournal

One Hundred Interesting Mathematical Calculations, Number 7 One Hundred Interesting Mathematical Calculations, Number 7: Julius Caesar's Last Breath What's the chance that the breath you just inhaled contains at least one air molecule that was in Julius Caesar's last breath--the one in which he said (according to Shakespeare) " Et tu Brute ? Then die Caesar"? Assume that the more than two thousand years that have passed have been enough time for all the molecules in Caesar's last breath to mix evenly in the atmosphere, and that only a trivial amount of the molecules have leaked out into the oceans or the ground. Assume further that there are about 10 44 molecules of air, and about 2 x 10 22 molecules in each breath--yours or Caesar's. That gives a chance of 2 x 10 22 /10 44 = 2x 10 -22 that any one particular molecule you breathe in came from Caesar's last breath. [1-2x10 -22 ] [2x10^22] How to evaluate this? [e [-2x10^(-22)] ] [2x10^(22)] From John Allen Paulos's Innumeracy . Related:  (0.1) Core & Keys concept....

Top five regrets of the dying There was no mention of more sex or bungee jumps. A palliative nurse who has counselled the dying in their last days has revealed the most common regrets we have at the end of our lives. And among the top, from men in particular, is 'I wish I hadn't worked so hard'. Bronnie Ware is an Australian nurse who spent several years working in palliative care, caring for patients in the last 12 weeks of their lives. She recorded their dying epiphanies in a blog called Inspiration and Chai, which gathered so much attention that she put her observations into a book called The Top Five Regrets of the Dying. Ware writes of the phenomenal clarity of vision that people gain at the end of their lives, and how we might learn from their wisdom. Here are the top five regrets of the dying, as witnessed by Ware: 1. "This was the most common regret of all. 2. "This came from every male patient that I nursed. 3. "Many people suppressed their feelings in order to keep peace with others. 4. 5.

Metta Sutta Metta Sutta This is what should be done by one who is skilled in goodness And who knows the path of peace: Let them be able and upright, straightforward and gentle in speech, Humble and not conceited, contented and easily satisfied. Unburdened with duties and frugal in their ways. Peaceful and calm, and wise and skilful, not proud and demanding in nature. Let them not do the slightest thing that the wise would later reprove. They should wish: In gladness and in safety May all beings be at ease. Let none deceive another, or despise any being in any state, Let none through anger or ill-will wish harm upon another. Even as a mother protects with her life her child, her only child, So with a boundless heart should one cherish all living beings, Radiating kindness over the entire world, Spreading upwards to the skies, and downwards to the depths, Outwards and unbounded, freed from hatred and ill-will.

Four Elements Presentation (Master’s Defense) — It's Elemental The following presentation was made literally thirty minutes before my Master’s thesis defense, when I thought to myself, hey, I should put together some slides! Luckily I had everything I needed already… you’ll have to imagine how I skilfully (ahem…) wove all the slides into a seamless tapestry. Tagged as: four elements, Master S Thesis, Master Thesis, Powerpoint, Presentation, Presentation Ppt, Slides, Tapestry, Thesis Defense, Thesis Presentation Aether (classical element) According to ancient and medieval science, aether (Greek: αἰθήρ aithēr[1]), also spelled æther or ether, also called quintessence, is the material that fills the region of the universe above the terrestrial sphere.[citation needed] The concept of aether was used in several theories to explain several natural phenomena, such as the traveling of light and gravity. In the late 19th century, physicists postulated that aether permeated all throughout space, providing a medium through which light could travel in a vacuum, but evidence for the presence of such a medium was not found in the Michelson–Morley experiment.[2] Medieval concept of the cosmos. Medieval scholastic philosophers granted aether changes of density, in which the bodies of the planets were considered to be more dense than the medium which filled the rest of the universe.[6] Robert Fludd stated that the aether was of the character that it was "subtler than light".

HOLOS GLOBAL SYSTEM Being in itself is the force. The action of being is the manifestation of its force. The force depends on the form while the aim of the action is an even greater force. Action in itself liberates the force. Every reactive action provokes other actions. What’s more every reactive action in itself liberates force. The action can be directed externally or internally of the being. The action that is directed internally causes a decomposition of the being that carries it out. The action directed externally results in disintegration or aggregation. Disintegration occurs when the action provokes contrast between the behaviour of the parts and the rules that hold them together. Aggregation occurs when the act proposes a new rule that encourages the parts to adopt suitable behaviour to improve relationships. If the being is alone, and therefore there is no external subject to the being, its first action can only be directed towards itself. The decomposition of the single being results in two or more parts.

3 (nombre) Un article de Wikipédia, l'encyclopédie libre. Dans un grand nombre de cultures, trois est le plus grand nombre écrit avec autant de lignes que le nombre représente. Même les Romains ont remplacé le nombre 4 écrit sous la forme IIII par la forme soustractive IV ; aujourd'hui en chinois, 3 est écrit avec trois lignes. La graphie « 3 » n'est pas la seule utilisée dans le monde ; un certain nombre d'alphabets — particulièrement ceux des langues du sous-continent indien et du sud-est asiatique — utilisent des graphies différentes. Trois est Un nombre élevé à la puissance trois est un cube. Les puissances entières successives de 3 sont : 1, 3, 9, 27, 81, 243, 729, 2187, 6561 ... Beaucoup de cultures humaines ont donné au concept de triplet des sens symboliques. Un groupe de trois est souvent appelé triade, trinité, trilogie, trio ou triplet. L'expression "haut comme trois pommes"L'expression "Jamais deux sans trois". Sur les autres projets Wikimedia :

Aura (paranormal) The Human Aura in a healthy woman after a diagram by Walter John Kilner (1847-1920). The picture depicts Kilner's "inner and outer auras." Colours have been added for illustrative purposes and have no other significance. An old Iranian Shi'a Muslim impression of Jesus and Mary shows an aura after the style of the farr In Iran the aura is known as farr or "glory": it is depicted in association with Zoroastrian kings.[10] Ideas of the aura are well represented in Indian religions. In the classical western mysticism of neoplatonism and Kabbalah the aura is associated with the lustre of the astral body, a subtle body identified with the planetary heavens, which were in turn associated with various mental faculties in an elaborate system of correspondences with colours, shapes, sounds, perfumes etc.[14] The symbolism of light found in the Bible is at times associated with the idea of the aura or "body of light":[15] similar interpretations are found in Islamic traditions.[16]

Chakra From an 1899 Yoga manuscript in the Braj Bhasa language. Their name derives from the Sanskrit word for "wheel" or "turning", but in the yogic context a better translation of the word is 'vortex or whirlpool'.[1][note 1] The concept of chakra features in tantric and yogic traditions of Hinduism and Buddhism. Etymology[edit] Sanskrit chakra derives from the Proto-Indo-European *kʷekʷlos; its cognates include Greek kuklos, Lithuanian kaklas, Tocharian B kokale, and English "wheel," as well as "circle" and "cycle".[2] M. "Circle," used in a variety of senses, symbolising endless rotation of shakti.A circle of people. The linguist Jorma Koivulehto wrote (2001) of the annual Finnish Kekri celebration, having borrowed the word from early Indo-Aryan Languages.[5] History[edit] Characteristics[edit] The texts and teachings present different numbers of chakras. "In fact, there is no "standard" system of the chakras. The following features are common: Use in religious traditions[edit] Hindu Tantra[edit]

Tolérance religieuse Un article de Wikipédia, l'encyclopédie libre. Histoire[modifier | modifier le code] Les religions monothéistes nient l'existence d'autres dieux que le leur. Ainsi les religions abrahamiques (judaïsme, christianisme, islam) qualifient les autres dieux d'idoles. Le judaïsme antique ordonnait la destruction des idoles à l'intérieur de ce qu'il considérait comme la Terre Promise. Certes, la tolérance dépend du corpus d'interprétations produit par les autorités religieuses. qui s'adressent aux autres religions ;qui expliquent aux fidèles et aux croyants comment se comporter avec les fidèles et croyants des autres religions. Avant le monothéisme, l'histoire semble montrer que les guerres de religion n'existaient pas (des guerres dont l'un des motifs, sinon le seul, était d'imposer sa religion, son dieu à l'ennemi) . Depuis Moïse, il semble qu'il n'y ait pas eu de conflit religieux sans que l'une des parties au moins n'ait été monothéiste. Le polythéisme antique[modifier | modifier le code]

Loyauté Un article de Wikipédia, l'encyclopédie libre. La loyauté est une qualité morale. La loyauté est le dévouement envers une cause ou une personne. Dans le confucianisme[modifier | modifier le code] La loyauté confucéenne se trouve dans le complexe fidélité-rectitude des relations sociales. Elle se rapporte aussi à la fiabilité (relation intention-réalisation) et la crédibilité. Dans les thérapies familiales[modifier | modifier le code] La loyauté est définie par rapport à un système relationnel qui relie un individu à un autre ou à un groupe. Suivant Karine et Thierry Albernhe[2]les loyautés sont définies par des caractéristiques, des formes et une dynamique particulière dans le cas du conflit de loyauté. Parmi les différentes formes de loyauté : la loyauté verticale (parents-enfants par exemple), asymétrique, irrésistiblela loyauté horizontale (entre amis par exemple), égalitaire, choisieles loyautés clivées (un enfant parentifié par exemple) Bibliographie[modifier | modifier le code]

Métaphysique (Aristote) Un article de Wikipédia, l'encyclopédie libre. La Métaphysique est un ensemble de quatorze livres écrits par Aristote réunis uniquement après sa mort. Le titre Métaphysique n'est pas d'Aristote lui-même, mais a été donné par le bibliothécaire Andronicos de Rhodes, qui a rassemblé et organisé les livres. Les traités qui forment la Métaphysique semblent avoir été publiés du vivant d'Aristote [1] Néanmoins, cette hypothèse est contredite par Asclépios de Tralles : Le présent ouvrage n'a pas l'unité des autres écrits d'Aristote, et manque d'ordre et d'enchaînement. Il laisse à désirer sous le rapport de la continuité du discours ; on y trouve des passages empruntés à des traités sur d'autres matières ; souvent la même chose y est redite plusieurs fois. Le texte ne fut donc publié qu'après la mort d'Eudème, et il est vraisemblable que ce dernier l'avait corrigé, peut-être avec l'aide de ses condisciples selon Alexandre d'Aphrodisie[2]. Les pythagoriciens se consacrèrent aux mathématiques. 1.

Causality The Illustrated Sutra of Cause and Effect. 8th century, Japan In common usage, causality is also the relation between a set of factors (causes) and a phenomenon (the effect). Anything that affects an effect is a factor of that effect. A direct factor is a factor that affects an effect directly, that is, without any intervening factors. The philosophical treatment on the subject of causality extends over millennia. History[edit] Western philosophy[edit] Aristotelian[edit] Aristotle identified four kinds of answer or explanatory mode to various "Why?" Of Aristotle's four kinds or explanatory modes, only one, the 'efficient cause' is a cause as defined in the leading paragraph of this present article. In some works of Aristotle, the four causes are listed as (1) the essential cause, (2) the logical ground, (3) the moving cause, and (4) the final cause. The word "efficient" used here can also be translated from Aristotle as "moving" or "initiating".[3] Aristotle himself explained, 1. 2. 3. 4.

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