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Bug-out bag

Bug-out bag
Off-the-shelf Red Cross preparedness kit . A bug-out bag[1][2] is a portable kit that contains the items one would require to survive for seventy-two hours[3][4] when evacuating from a disaster. The focus is on evacuation, rather than long-term survival, distinguishing the bug-out bag from a survival kit, a boating or aviation emergency kit, or a fixed-site disaster supplies kit. The kits are also popular in the survivalism subculture.[5] The term "bug-out bag" is related to, and possibly derived from, the "bail-out bag" emergency kit many military aviators carry. Other names for such a bag are a BOB,[7] 72-hour kit,[8] a grab bag,[9] a battle box, a Personal Emergency Relocation Kits (PERK), a go bag or a GOOD bag (Get Out Of Dodge) INCHbag (I'm Never Coming Home).[10] Rationale[edit] Some survivalists also recommend keeping a 'get me home' kit in the car and/or at work. Typical contents[edit] Enough food and water to last for 72 hours. See also[edit] References[edit] Jump up ^ J.

Bug Out Bag – The 7 Types of Gear You Must Have to Survive Bug Out Bag For someone new to being a Survivalist building your first Bug Out Bag can seem like a big task. Everybody you read about has been tweaking theirs for months or even years and has a pile of gear built up. It’s hard to know where to start, but if you cover all of the basics in a survival situation you will still be much better off that 99% of the people. A Bug Out Bag, also called a BOB, I.N.C.H Bag (I’m Never Coming Home Bag),Get Out of Dodge Bag (GOOD Bag), or 72 Hour Bag is usually designed to get you out of an emergency situation and allow you to survive self-contained for up to 3 days. Here are the 7 basic types of gear you will need for your Bug Out Bag: 1. It should go without saying that water is a survival basic for any situation. 1 Liter per day per person is really the bare minimum. To expand your capability or survive longer than a couple of days you will need a water purification system. 2. Backpack Meals 3. 4. They Don’t have a ground tarp… 5. 6. 7.

Survival Gear & Bug Out Bags A Bug out bag is basically a large survival kit that’s filled with everything you need to survive after a disaster. A Bug Out Bag allows you quickly grab what you need should you be forced to evacuate during a disaster. Most experts suggest that your BOB should contain enough supplies to last for at least seventy-two hours. Since most major disasters often disrupt services and normal life for longer than 72 hours, we think it is a good idea to have a Bag that will allow you survive for an indefinite period of time. Make sure your Bag is built to fit your needs; some people may need items that are not listed on this list. Remember that these are just some general guidelines meant to help you get your bag together. Below we discuss some of the items that you may want to include in your Bug Out Bags, as well as some items that will hold up when it really counts. This will depend on a number of factors, such as the area you live in (climate, elevation, etc….)

34 Essential Items For Your Bug Out Bag Imagine the following scenario. You are awakened in the middle of the night by the jolt of a powerful earthquake. Your house is leveled, but thankfully you and your family are uninjured. However, the roads are impassable, your utilities have been cut off, and many of your neighbors were injured or killed in the earthquake. Unfortunately, this was a very real scenario for the people of Haiti. What exactly is a bug out bag? A bug out bag is a collection of basic survival gear that might be required in a disaster scenario, natural or otherwise. The actual bag could be as simple as an extra frameless backpack or duffel bag, or as elaborate as a framed ALICE pack or similar framed backpack. What About Bugging In? In some cases, it might make sense to “bug in.” What goes in a bug out bag? Anticipating worst-case scenarios is never fun, but to properly pack your bug out bag with only the essential items, you must start here. A couple rations of food (I buy from MountainHouse.com).

Bug Out Bags – The Ultimate Resource Guide What’s a Bug Out Bag? Most people who have a basic understanding of survival and preparedness understand the need for a good Bug Out Bag. It’s probably one of the most talked about items on survival websites and is something that has become a bit of an iconic symbol for preppers and survivalists. If you haven’t heard of the term Bug Out Bag you may have heard someone refer to it as a; Go Bag, 72 Hour Bag, Get Home Bag, Get out of Dodge bag or some other variation. The basic idea behind a Bug Out Bag (BOB) is pretty simple. What items do you really need in your Bug Out Bag? There really is no One Size Fits All Bug Out Bag solution. Starting with a good plan is really the only way to get started. What are the most likely disaster situations you will face? Once you’ve thought about the above considerations, you can then start to pack your bag. Considerations to think about before packing your BOB: Who will be traveling with you? THE BIG 4 – Water, Shelter, Food, Protection

How do I go about becoming independent Lots of us had little or no experience and financial education before we hit the trail either. Planning a bit will help make the transition smooth and fun. It's good you're getting a checking acct. Learn to track your spending as accurately as possible. Avoid bouncing checks!! Speaking of credit... I know it might seem early to start thinking of things like retirement, but I WISH someone had told me about the importance of saving early. Create a budget for yourself. If possible try to avoid getting hooked into a lot of unnecessary bills, like cable, cell phones, eating out... Take some time and look through the apt listings for the various areas where you live. Transportation can be a HUGE cost. Room mates can help defer some of the costs, but they can be a HUGE pain in the butt too, so only consider one if you really can't manage the costs solo. If you can, save a thousand or two before you leave home, so you have a cushion in case you lose your job, get ill or whatever.

When Should I Become Financially Independent? Question: When Should I Become Financially Independent? Recently I have heard many questions about people wondering if it is okay to accept a little bit of extra money from their parents after they graduate from college. These are not generally the people still living with parents. Most of these people already have jobs, not great jobs, but decent jobs, but want to continue with a higher lifestyle or they may want to move to a more expensive place to live. It is an important question to ask yourself. Answer: Ideally you should become financially independent from your parents as soon as possible. If you are having difficulty covering your monthly expenses then you have a serious income or spending problem that you need to address. Many people also wonder about whether or not it is acceptable to accept the occasional help from your parents. You can prevent this from happening by establishing a good size emergency fund.

MacGyver, Survivalist, or Stockpiler: The Urban Survival Skills Everyone Should Know It's your word against his.. If he ain't talkin, your word pretty much wins. Also, don't try draggin him back in your house after he's dead.. The cops will be able to tell he was shot inside your house. As soon as you're involved in a shooting like this, call the cops, then a lawyer.. You are so bad ass. Seriously, you're advocating shooting a potential burglar with your "Mossy, Remy or Mr. We're not all in middle school, you know, and life is not like a Die Hard movie. I don't want to kill anyone. I am not running from my house. You can be a moral coward and subject yourself to the will of a criminal, however I will suffer no such victimization. @jodark It's not cowardly to leave and certainly not morally cowardly to leave if there is an intruder in your house. Unless you were a soldier or a police officer, you have probably not faced a life or death situation, and frankly, you are likely not equipped to fight back adequately.

Are You Ready to Move Out? If you moved back in after you graduated from college or if you stayed at home while attending school, you may be anxious and ready to move out on your own. It can be frustrating to live at home with your parents when you are no longer a teenager. However, if you move out before you are in a position to support yourself, you may end up hurting your credit and setting yourself up to live at home again. 1. Before you move out you need to make sure that you can afford to live on your own. 2. It is also important to consider the amount of debt you currently have. 3. Before you move out you should have an emergency fund saved up and set aside. 4. When you move out you will need to have money saved for your first and last month’s rent, any deposit and rental application fee that you may have.

12 Gadgets Now is a good time to ponder the apocalypse. Iran and North Korea are going nuclear, the wonky weather is a harbinger of catastrophic climate change, and end-of-the-world blockbusters abound. (Tim Burton's '9' came out last week and '2012,' 'The Road,' and 'Zombieland' are all coming up later this fall.) In that dismal spirit, the Switched team has gathered its first choices for last-chance gadgetry -- a collection of 12 must-haves if society is in peril, whether it be by fire or ice, zombies or aliens. Using our handy "What Type of Apocalypse Will It Be?" ACR Electronics Microfix Personal Beacon Good for: Zombie Attack, Rapidly Spreading Virus, Aliens, Floods With an internal GPS, this little guy signals satellites to identify your exact location, as well as your name, address, and medical info. Scope Ford F-650 XUV Eton American Red Cross Solarlink FR360 Radio 400 Ft. Therm-A-Rest Tech Blanket LIFESAVER Bottle Jetboil Personal Cooking System Orange Solar Concept Tent Voltaic Solar Bags

Do-it-yourself Survival Kit The Do-it-yourself Coffee Can Survival Kit This is a compact kit that can be carried in the car, on the boat, or in a pack for hunting, hiking, exploring, etc. Most of the contents will fit in a one-pound coffee can which doubles as a pot for melting snow and device with which to dig an emergency snow shelter. (However, if you can carry it, include a small shovel. It is far, far better than trying to use a coffee can.) Keep three points in mind when putting together a survival kit. Thirdly, bring enough to enable you to spend at least one night out. Thanks to Allan Priddy who helps teach the Wilderness Survival class for putting this list together. General Items Repair Kit Sewing kit Dental floss (It's strong and useful as thread for sewing, or a fishing line or for lashing branches for improvised shelters.) First Aid Kit (Also see Lightweight First Aid Kit) Moleskin Sterile pads (2 x 2 and 4 x 4) Sterile Gauze Neosporin Bandaids Aspirin First Aid Tape Nourishment Optional

How to eat wild stuff and not get poisoned (how-to) Let's play pretend for a moment. Are you with me? Let's pretend you can't go down to the supermarket for food to eat. In fact, let's pretend that there is not a supermarket for one hundred miles in any direction, and you don't have any food with you. Does this seem unlikely? What this guide is:This is a guide to wild things that are 100% safe to eat. What this guide is not:This is NOT a guide to figuring out if something may or may not be safe to eat. BerriesThis is very easy to make 100% foolproof. Unless you are completely sure, do not eat non-aggregate berries - berries that are shaped like blueberries or gooseberries. Green StuffMost "green stuff" is not outright toxic, but can definitely cause you some distress. Note: You should use caution when eating any plant, particularly plants found in the water - they can harbor any creepy crawly that may have been living in the water, including giardia cryptosporidium among others. CrittersNever eat wild critters raw!

Homemade MREs For quite a while now, I've wanted to make up my own "MREs" for my Get Home Bag (GHB). I was recently out scouting some properties, and realized that my GHB only had some packs of tuna and some candy in them. I had broken my own Cardinal Rule - If you use it, replace it immediately. So, I went about making up some MRE packages. I assembled my "ingredients" based on "Best By" date, calories and protein content. The idea was to put long-life food together and vacuum seal it in a FoodSaver bag. For my first MRE, here's what I included - It includes: One individual serving of Beef-a-roni, 2 ounces (by weight - about 1/2 cup) of dry roasted peanuts, one pack of Land-o-Lakes French Vanilla cappuccio, one Promax energy bar, 4 pieces of Jolly Rancher hard candy, and utensiles (plastic spoon, knife and 2 napkins). Since the peanuts were loose, I wanted to separate them in the pouch. I then filled that with the peanuts and sealed it. Here are the stats - Here's the result - Times have changed!

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