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ECDC 12/05/09 ECDC Webcast on Personal Protective Measures regarding Influenza A(H1N1)

ECDC 12/05/09 ECDC Webcast on Personal Protective Measures regarding Influenza A(H1N1)
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EUROPE 05/05/09 Le nouveau virus de la grippe sous surveillance Les États membres et les institutions de l'UE coopèrent étroitement afin d'endiguer la propagation de la grippe A/H1N1. Les cas de grippe continuent d'augmenter dans le monde, dans des proportions proches de la pandémie. Toutefois, il est peu probable que le virus entraîne une mortalité élevée. Androulla Vassiliou, commissaire chargée de la santé, demande à chacun de garder son calme. La plupart des cas de grippe sont bénins et traités efficacement. Le virus A/H1N1 est une combinaison inédite d'éléments humains et animaux. Si de nouveaux cas ont été confirmés en Europe, rien n'indique que la grippe y soit en phase de propagation rapide. Nouveaux cas de grippe: mise à jour quotidienne Action concertée face à l'apparition de la nouvelle grippe

EUROPE AOUT 2009 A/H1N1 virus rears its ugly head in… pigs Researchers in Germany have added a twist to the pandemic currently affecting humans: the influenza virus A/H1N1 has been shown to be infectious in pigs and to spread quickly in a trial pig population. Published in The Journal of General Virology, the results of the study are part of the EU-funded EPIZONE ('Network on epizootic disease diagnosis and control') project, which is supported under the Sixth Framework Programme (FP6) to the tune of EUR 14 million. The objectives of the German study were to determine whether experimental intranasal infection of pigs with the novel influenza virus results in clinical signs and causes virus excretion, whether infection triggers changes in T- or B-lymphocyte subsets, and whether uninfected pigs and chickens could become infected. A total of three 'naïve' pigs and five naïve chickens were housed together in direct contact with the infected animals.

EUROPE 30/07/09 Questions and answers about the influenza A(H1N1) Introduction Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 (also known as "swine flu") is a new type of influenza that is characterized by its rapid spread among humans all over the world since its emergence in April 2009. The virus has been found to contain genes from pig, bird and human influenza viruses, in a combination that has never been observed before. At the European Union (EU) level, the Commission has been working from the very beginning of the crisis in five strategic areas: vaccine development, vaccination strategies, joint procurement of the vaccine, communication with the public and support to non EU countries. The European Commission continues to work in cooperation with the 27 Member States, the EEA countries (Iceland, Norway and Liechtenstein) and key global partners such as the Global Health Security Initiative (includes the G7 countries – Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, United Kingdom, USA – and Mexico and World Health Organization). Read more What the Commission is doing

Eurosurveillance, Volume 14, Issue 26, 02 July 2009 Eurosurveillance, Volume 14, Issue 26, 02 July 2009 Table of Contents Rapid communications by L Marinova, M Kojouharova, Z Mihneva After seven years without indigenous transmission of measles in Bulgaria, an increasing number of cases have been reported since 15 April 2009. show more... After seven years without indigenous transmission of measles in Bulgaria, an increasing number of cases have been reported since 15 April 2009. Hide text by A Tarantola, T Mollet, J Gueguen, P Barboza, E Bertherat Plague is circulating regularly in localised areas worldwide, causing sporadic cases outside Africa and remains endemic or causes limited outbreaks in some African countries. Plague is circulating regularly in localised areas worldwide, causing sporadic cases outside Africa and remains endemic or causes limited outbreaks in some African countries. by G Cruz-Pacheco, L Duran, L Esteva, AA Minzoni, M López-Cervantes, P Panayotaros, A Ahued Ortega, I Villaseñor Ruíz by N Wilson, MG Baker Research articles

CDC EID Volume 16, Number 1–January 2010 - Dispatch - Serologic Cross-Reactivity with Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Virus in Pigs, Europe Skip directly to local search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options CDC Home CDC 24/7: Saving Lives. Protecting People.™ <div class="noscript"> Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported by your browser. Emerging Infectious Disease ISSN: 1080-6059 Volume 16, Number 1—January 2010 Dispatch Serologic Cross-Reactivity with Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Virus in Pigs, Europe Article Contents Constantinos S. Author affiliations: Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium (C.S. Suggested citation for this article Abstract We tested serum samples from pigs infected or vaccinated with European swine influenza viruses (SIVs) in hemagglutination-inhibition assays against pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus and related North American SIVs. Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus is a reassortant of >2 circulating swine influenza viruses (SIVs) (1). Recent experimental studies confirmed pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus can become established in swine populations (3,4).

EUROPE 15/07/09 food safety - Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza virus - Surveillance and control measures for the pandemic (H1N1 The pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza virus is a new virus subtype of influenza A (H1N1) viruses that spreads from human to human and is causing a human influenza pandemic in accordance with the declaration made by the WHO on 11 June 2009. The pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza virus contains gene segments from pig, bird and human influenza viruses in a combination that has never been observed before. Apart from humans, the virus has been found on some rare occasions in pigs in North America, South America, Australia and Europe including some Member States. So far there is no evidence that animals play a role in the spread of this pandemic influenza which is primarily a human disease. However, it is expected that more infections will occur in pigs given the wide circulation of the virus in the human population. Related information on pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza in animals has been published by: OIE / WHO / FAO. Swine influenza is not a food borne zoonoses.

AASP 02/07/09 EU H1N1 Research Supports ARS Findings July 2, 2009 — Harry Snelson Research into the novel A/H1N1 influenza virus funded by the European Union supports recent findings by the USDA's National Animal Disease Center regarding clinical presentation and pathogenicity in swine. Preliminary results of the studies coordinated by the Veterinary Laboratory in Weybridge indicate that pigs infected with the novel A/H1N1 virus experience clinical signs similar to routine exposure with swine influenza virus and that the virus is shed to naïve animals for up to 10 days peaking between 3 to 5 days post-inoculation. Researchers concluded that pigs are susceptible to infection with influenza A (H1N1) virus that results in the induction of detectable levels of clinical disease, virus shedding and pathology in an experimental setting. Source: Defra Harry Snelson is the Director of Communications for the AASV

EFSA 11/05/09 Nouvelle influenza A (H1N1) L’EFSA suit de près le foyer du nouveau virus de l’influenza de type A (initialement appelée « grippe porcine ») signalé pour la première fois chez des humains au Mexique et aux États-Unis et notifié à l’Organisation mondiale de la santé. En accord avec sa mission, l’EFSA surveille plus particulièrement les aspects de la situation qui concernent la santé animale et la sécurité des aliments. Le virus en cause dans le foyer actuel de grippe humaine – et découvert aussi dans un élevage de porcs au Canada – est une nouvelle souche du virus de l’influenza H1N1. Elle contient des gènes des virus de la grippe porcine, aviaire et humaine, combinés sous une forme qui n’a jamais été observée auparavant. Ce nouveau virus est un réassortiment de virus qui ont circulé chez les porcs en Europe, en Asie et en Amérique depuis 1998. Rôle de l’EFSA Le virus en cause dans le foyer actuel de grippe humaine est une nouvelle souche du virus de l’influenza H1N1. Quid des consommateurs de viande de porc crue?

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