background preloader

Geologic Time

Geologic Time
The Earth is very old -- 4.5 billion years or more according to recent estimates. Most of the evidence for an ancient Earth is contained in the rocks that form the Earth's crust. The rock layers themselves -- like pages in a long and complicated history -- record the surface-shaping events of the past, and buried within them are traces of life --the plants and animals that evolved from organic structures that existed perhaps 3 billion years ago. Also contained in rocks once molten are radioactive elements whose isotopes provide Earth with an atomic clock. Within these rocks, "parent" isotopes decay at a predictable rate to form "daughter" isotopes. By determining the relative amounts of parent and daughter isotopes, the age of these rocks can be calculated.

http://pubs.usgs.gov/gip/geotime/time.html

Related:  Âges préhistoriquesMCHS SCIENCEno

100 Coolest Science Experiments on YouTube - X-Ray Technician Schools Although YouTube has something of a reputation as a repository for the inane mental diarrhea of stunted man-children injuring each other for cheap laughs or shrill teenage drama queens shrieking like harpies over the latest bland, interchangeable lump passing as the epitome of masculine beauty, many others thankfully take advantage of its services as a portal to share their knowledge and educate viewers. While few of the scientific offerings formally follow the scientific method or test an explicitly stated hypothesis, even those videos veering more towards demonstrating various principles, theories, and laws still offer visitors a chance to learn something about how the world around them operates. By this point, it should go without saying that many of the following videos contain procedures that may be dangerous to perform at home or without the proper equipment and/or training. Please do not duplicate any of these experiments unless assured that they are entirely safe for amateurs.

Frightening Monsters Drawn On Post-It Notes I love how these monster drawings channel the spirits of Edward Gorey and Maurice Sendak in perfect measure. Created in artist John Kenn’s spare time (between raising twins and directing childrens shows) each of these images is very tiny: it was drawn using only office supplies on Post-It notes. Check out Kenn’s large collection of top-notch work at johnkenn.blogspot.com. Known in some circles as the most amazing man in the universe, he once saved an entire family of muskrats from a sinking, fire engulfed steamboat while recovering from two broken arms relating to a botched no-chute wingsuit landing in North Korea.

A rich club in the human brain Wednesday, November 2, 2011 This image shows the group connectome, with the nodes and connections colored according to their rich-club participation. Green represents few connections. Red represents the most. Credit: Reprinted with permission: Van den Heuvel, et al. The Journal of Neuroscience 2011 Science Classroom Lessons Microscope Mania Pond Water Survey Hydra Investigation Animal Classification Challenge Incredible Edible Cells - Cell Project Construction Zone - Cell Project Mitosis Flip Books Genetics with a Smile + SpongeBob Genetics DNA Keychains & Replication Protein Power Game Egg-cellent Ideas for Osmosis & Diffusion Human Body Activities (Body Systems, Skeletal System, Muscular System) Also see Silly Science - a dichotomous key activity in General Science section! Internet Lessons • The Organ Trail - Challenge your students to create a "Wanted" poster about an organ. This download provides project guidelines, student information, and project worksheets. Links for students can be found on the Health & Human Body links page of the Kid Zone.

ClassicScienceLife Mr.Q's LabNotes is a free monthly newsletter which provides lessons and insights as to new developments in Mr.Q's world. Free is good. Free is our friend! Check out the Blog of Mr.Q for new ways to supplement the Classic Science curriculum at home! This is Why I'll Never be an Adult I have repeatedly discovered that it is important for me not to surpass my capacity for responsibility. Over the years, this capacity has grown, but the results of exceeding it have not changed. Normally, my capacity is exceeded gradually, through the accumulation of simple, daily tasks. But a few times a year, I spontaneously decide that I'm ready to be a real adult. I don't know why I decide this; it always ends terribly for me.

Human Thought Controls Neurons in Brain Neuroscience research involving epileptic patients with brain electrodes surgically implanted in their medial temporal lobes shows that patients learned to consciously control individual neurons deep in the brain with thoughts. Subjects learned to control mouse cursors, play video games and alter focus of digital images with their thoughts. The patients were each using brain computer interfaces, deep brain electrodes and software designed for the research. The article below offers more detail. Controlling Individual Cortical Nerve Cells by Human Thought

Synthetic Biology Synthetic biology is perhaps the most accelerating science. In fact, since biology became an information technology, for the past several years synthetic biology has been developing even faster than Moore's Law. And just one example - paralel to the pioneering days of computer science, is the explosion in DIY biology garage-based hacker labs. There is a large and rapidly growing number of relevant YouTube videos. This page will post a collection of some of the most interesting ones I could find but feel free to contribute more clips of your own:

Force and Motion Facts Motion makes the world go 'round. Motion makes the moon go 'round too. In fact, motion makes lots of things go. When we think of motion we often think of cars, bicycles, kids running, basketballs bouncing and airplanes flying. But motion is so much more. Motion is important to our lives and impacts so many things that we do. How to Draw Girls: The Molly Crabapple Way As the founder of Dr. Sketchy’s Anti-Art School, I’m besieged by newbies who want to attend, but have the terror they’re not good enough. Here’s an basic guide to the complex art of figure drawing, so you can show up to your local alt.drawing salon and wield you pencil with pride. 1.)

Yosemite: Where a Waterfall Catches Fire In nature's game, water beats fire -- which is why I'm dying to see a dramatic interpretation of the opposite at Horsetail Falls in Yosemite National Park. Apparently during the last two weeks of February, orange sunsets are reflected in the falls each evening, which makes the cascading water look like it's on fire. "Fire-water is falling from a cliff" is what your brain thinks. ABC Science Hot tags Weather Climate Change Planets and Asteroids Archaeology Fossils Editor's choice Sunday, 15 January 2017 RN Offtrack Counting birds to save the Murray-Darling Friday, 18 November 2016 Professor Richard Kingsford has spent much of his life counting birds: a critical body of work that shows Australia's rivers are under threat. Great Moments in Science

Related:  CPBIOmuddslingerPaleontologyperlacopernikEvolution & organismerHistory & Scienceusa scienceother science stuffScience