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Five Time-Saving Strategies for the Flipped Classroom

Five Time-Saving Strategies for the Flipped Classroom
A few months ago, I heard a podcast by Michael Hyatt, a best-selling author and speaker who helps clients excel in their personal and professional lives. This particular podcast focused on how to “create margins” in life to reduce stress and avoid burnout. Quoting Dr. Richard Swenson’s work, Hyatt defines a margin as “the space between our load and our limits. It is the amount allowed beyond that which is needed. . . . Margin is the gap between rest and exhaustion. . . . As I listened to this podcast, I realized that the idea of creating margins also applies to the flipped classroom. If these comments sound familiar, it might be helpful to create margins in your flipped classroom. Recommendation #1: Find flippable moments.Faculty interested in the flipped classroom get really excited about the flipped classroom. Recommendation #2: Make small changes.Once you identify the flippable moments in a course, focus on a specific lesson. Let’s keep the conversation going. Resources:Hyatt, M.

http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/blended-flipped-learning/five-time-saving-strategies-flipped-classroom/

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Five Ways to Motivate Unprepared Students in the Flipped Classroom In the previous article “Ready to Flip: Three Ways to Hold Students Accountable for Pre-Class Work,” I mentioned that one of the most frequently asked questions about the flipped classroom model is, “How do you encourage students to actually do the pre-class work and come to class prepared?” A few days after the article was published, a reader emailed me to ask a follow up question. It’s actually the second most popular question I hear from educators. She asked, “What do you do when students still aren’t coming to class prepared?” The flipped classroom model—or any active, student-centered learning model—relies heavily on students being prepared and ready to engage in the learning activities.

Ready to Flip: Three Ways to Hold Students Accountable for Pre-Class Work - Faculty Focus One of the most frequent questions faculty ask about the flipped classroom model is: “How do you encourage students to actually do the pre-class work and come to class prepared?” This is not really a new question for educators. We’ve always assigned some type of homework, and there have always been students who do not come to class ready to learn. However, the flipped classroom conversation has launched this question straight to the top of the list of challenges faculty face when implementing this model in their classrooms. By design, the flipped model places more emphasis on the importance of homework or pre-class work to ensure that in-person class time is effective, allowing the instructor and the students to explore higher levels of application and analysis together. If students are unprepared, it leads to frustration, stress, and anxiety for everyone.

Four Assessment Strategies for the Flipped Learning Environment Flipped learning environments offer unique opportunities for student learning, as well as some unique challenges. By moving direct instruction from the class group space to the individual students’ learning spaces, time and space are freed up for the class as a learning community to explore the most difficult concepts of the course. Likewise, because students are individually responsible for learning the basics of new material, they gain regular experience with employing self-regulated learning strategies they would not have in an unflipped environment. But because initial engagement with new material is done independently as a preparation for class time rather than as its focus, many things could go wrong.

11 Indicators of Excellence in Instruction (Flipped or Otherwise) In 2013, the Flipped Learning Network published an official definition of Flipped Learning. Along with this definition, the FLN defined these 4 Pillars of Flipped Learning, revolving around the acronym, F-L-I-P: The 4 Pillars of Flipped Learning are … Flexible EnvironmentLearning CultureIntentional ContentProfessional Educator

Flipped Classroom Survey Highlights Benefits and Challenges Perhaps no other word has been as popular in higher education during the past few years as the term “flipped.” As a result, there is no shortage of ideas and opinions about flipped learning environments. Some faculty consider it another way to talk about student-centered learning.

The First Thing I Ever Designed: Elana Schlenker and Gratuitous Type MagazineEye on Design “I have what’s probably not a great inclination to pursue what I love first and figure out the money later,” says Elana Schlenker matter-of-factly as she recounts putting together the very first issue of Gratuitous Type, her celebrated “journal of typographic smut.” These words are ones that probably ring true to anyone who’s ever started their own independent magazine, a notoriously ambitious, time-consuming venture. The story of Schlenker’s first issue of Gratuitous Type is a lot like the story of many first issues, which are often a tense combination of a passionate desire to make and say something new, a lot of head bashing with printers and distributors, and a clueless, frantic stab in the dark. Magazines have become key portfolio pieces for young designers, the perfect medium for showcasing a range of skills.

Flipped Classroom: Engaging Students with EdPuzzle The flipped classroom model is a blended learning strategy I use to present my vocabulary, writing, and grammar instruction online. Students watch videos at home where they can control the pace of their learning, then they come to class prepared to apply that information in collaborative student-centered activities. One thing I emphasize when I lead professional development for teachers is the importance of flipping and engaging.

Four Assessment Strategies for the Flipped Learning Environment Flipped learning environments offer unique opportunities for student learning, as well as some unique challenges. By moving direct instruction from the class group space to the individual students’ learning spaces, time and space are freed up for the class as a learning community to explore the most difficult concepts of the course. Likewise, because students are individually responsible for learning the basics of new material, they gain regular experience with employing self-regulated learning strategies they would not have in an unflipped environment. But because initial engagement with new material is done independently as a preparation for class time rather than as its focus, many things could go wrong. If students do the assigned pre-class work but don’t acquire enough fluency with the basics—or if they simply don’t do it at all—then the in-class experience could be somewhere between lethargic and disastrous. A key to achieving this kind of environment is assessment.

A veteran teacher turned coach shadows 2 students for 2 days – a sobering lesson learned The following account comes from a veteran HS teacher who just became a Coach in her building. Because her experience is so vivid and sobering I have kept her identity anonymous. But nothing she describes is any different than my own experience in sitting in HS classes for long periods of time. And this report of course accords fully with the results of our student surveys.

How to Create a Learning Video They’ll Want to Watch Hiring Mark Zuckerberg to deliver a workshop or run a retreat is not always the most practical or cost-effective solution. Know what’s not impractical? Bringing thousands of today’s industry leaders and visionaries to your employees through short-form video to share the lessons they’ve learned through triumphs and failures in their own careers. This kind of video-driven thought leadership education is an efficient way companies can adopt to scale best practices from visionaries who are out there right now, setting the pace in every industry. But watching a TED Talk on creativity and becoming a more creative problem-solver at work are two different things. How can a chief learning officer transform inspiring thought-leadership into practical know-how, especially in the soft skill areas so crucial to leading-edge businesses today?

Flipping Assessment: Making Assessment a Learning Experience If you’re a regular reader of this blog, you’re already aware that flipped instruction has become the latest trend in higher education classrooms. And for good reason. As it was first articulated by Bergmann and Sams, flipped instruction personalizes education by “redirecting attention away from the teacher and putting attention on the learner and learning.” How to Criticize with Kindness: Philosopher Daniel Dennett on the Four Steps to Arguing Intelligently By Maria Popova “In disputes upon moral or scientific points,” Arthur Martine counseled in his magnificent 1866 guide to the art of conversation, “let your aim be to come at truth, not to conquer your opponent. So you never shall be at a loss in losing the argument, and gaining a new discovery.” Of course, this isn’t what happens most of the time when we argue, both online and off, but especially when we deploy the artillery of our righteousness from behind the comfortable shield of the keyboard. That form of “criticism” — which is really a menace of reacting rather than responding — is worthy of Mark Twain’s memorable remark that “the critic’s symbol should be the tumble-bug: he deposits his egg in somebody else’s dung, otherwise he could not hatch it.” But it needn’t be this way — there are ways to be critical while remaining charitable, of aiming not to “conquer” but to “come at truth,” not to be right at all costs but to understand and advance the collective understanding.

How to Create Assessments for the Flipped Classroom It seems like everyone is talking about the flipped classroom. But how do you use this new model to construct lessons and assessments that reinforce student learning? “Flipping” involves turning Bloom’s Taxonomy on its head. Instead of using class time to convey the basic information you want your students to remember and asking them to work on more difficult learning tasks alone, a flipped class asks students to come to class prepared with the foundational information and then to work on the challenging tasks of analysis, evaluation, and creation with others. Barbi Honeycutt, PhD, is the director of graduate teaching programs at North Carolina State University and the founder of Flip It Consulting.

Flipped Courses: A Few Concerns about the Rush to Flip I have some concerns about flipping courses. Maybe I’m just hung up on the name—flipping is what we do with pancakes. It’s a quick, fluid motion and looks easy to those of us waiting at the breakfast table. I’m not sure those connotations are good when associated with courses and that leads to what centers my concerns.

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