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John William Waterhouse: Comprehensive Painting Gallery of Artwo

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Welcome :: John William Waterhouse :: johnwilliamwaterhouse.com Sea monster Sea monsters are sea-dwelling mythical or legendary creatures, often believed to be of immense size. Marine monsters can take many forms, including sea dragons, sea serpents, or multi-armed beasts. They can be slimy or scaly and are often pictured threatening ships or spouting jets of water. Sightings and legends[edit] Plate ca. 1544 depicting various sea monsters; compiled from the Carta Marina. Historically, decorative drawings of heraldic dolphins and sea monsters were frequently used to illustrate maps, such as the Carta marina. Sea serpent reported by Hans Egede, Bishop of Greenland, in 1734. Sea monster accounts are found in virtually all cultures that have contact with the sea. a most terrible creature, resembling nothing they saw before. Other reports are known from the Pacific, Indian and Southern Oceans (e.g. see Heuvelmans 1968). It is debatable what these modern "monsters" might be. Alleged sea monster carcasses[edit] Legendary sea monsters[edit] Sea monsters in fiction[edit]

"Dear Mr. Rockwell: You painted one of my sons black." From the Norman Rockwell fan mail archive: “Dear Mr. Rockwell, Let me start this letter by telling you that I am the mother of two of the boys that posed for the 1974 Boy Scout Calendar. “This is a very difficult letter to write as my boys happen to be twins and you painted one of them ‘black.’ Of course, they are both ‘white.’ “The boys have been eagerly awaiting the calendars and so have all our friends. “I realize nothing can be done now but maybe you could write Steve (the one you painted black) a little note of apology so he’ll know it was a mistake. “The twins never even cashed your check as they are saving them as a souvenir of the day they posed for you. “Mr. Yours sincerely, Jennie Negron” For the 1975 calendar, Norman Rockwell cast an African-American young man for the role.

Groups - Drawing Paradise Heads: ___________________________________________________Front View Begin by drawing a large circle. Divide this circle horizontally into thirds, and cut it in half with a vertical line. Next, draw a little mark (a short line, not a dot) directly beneath the circle. Next, you want to flesh out the face so it isn't so thin. Now that you have the shape of the face down, you will want to add the eyes, nose and mouth. Next, erase those diagonal guidelines and fill in the detail on the eyes. Begin with a large circle, just like you did with the frontal view, except now rotate all the guidelines up and to the left. Next, extend the curved vertical guideline down the sphere, and select a point beneath the sphere to represent the chin. To flesh out the face a little more, draw round triangles on the sides of each of the diagonal guidelines. Next, draw the eyes, nose, and mouth. The nose generally starts right beneath the eyes, and the mouth right beneath the nose. Hair: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Sylvia Ji Loch Ness Monster The Loch Ness Monster is a cryptid, a creature whose existence has been suggested but is not discovered or documented by the scientific community.[3] It is reputedly a large unknown animal that inhabits Loch Ness in the Scottish Highlands. It is similar to other supposed lake monsters in Scotland and elsewhere, though its description varies from one account to the next. Popular interest and belief in the animal's existence has varied since it was first brought to the world's attention in 1933. Evidence of its existence is anecdotal, with minimal and much-disputed photographic material and sonar readings. Origins Loch Ness History Saint Columba (6th century) The earliest report of a monster associated with the vicinity of Loch Ness appears in the Life of St. Spicers (1933) In August 1933 a motorcyclist named Arthur Grant claimed to have nearly hit the creature while approaching Abriachan on the north-eastern shore, at about 1 a.m. on a moonlit night. Chief Constable William Fraser (1938) C.

The Seven Works of Mercy (Caravaggio) The Seven Works of Mercy (Italian: Sette opere di Misericordia), also known as The Seven Acts of Mercy, is an oil painting by Italian painter Caravaggio, circa 1607. The painting depicts the seven corporal works of mercy in traditional Catholic belief, which are a set of compassionate acts concerning the material welfare of others. The painting was made for, and is still housed in, the church of Pio Monte della Misericordia in Naples. Originally it was meant to be seven separate panels around the church; however, Caravaggio combined all seven works of mercy in one composition which became the church's altarpiece. The painting is better seen from il "coreto" (little choir) in the first floor. The titular seven works/acts of mercy are represented in the painting as follows: Bury the dead In the background, two men carry a dead man (of whom only the feet are visible). Visit the imprisoned, and feed the hungry On the right, a woman visits an imprisoned man and gives him milk from her breast.

Russian Mother Takes Magical Pictures of Her Two Kids With Animals On Her Farm These wonderful photographs by Elena Shumilova plunge the viewer into a beautiful world that revolves around two boys and their adorable dog, cat, duckling and rabbit friends. Taking advantage of natural colors, weather conditions and her enchanting surroundings, the gifted Russian artist creates cozy and heartwarming photography that will leave you amazed. Show Full Text The boys in the photographs are the photographer’s sons and the animals belong to the farm she runs. “I largely trust my intuition and inspiration when I compose photos. Rural settings, natural phenomena and the changing seasons seem to be the greatest stimuli in her works. Shumilova told us her passion for photography manifested in early 2012 when she got her first camera. We suggest you take a cup of tea, lean back comfortably in your armchair and browse this beautiful collection of Elena Shumilova’s photographs. See her gallery on: Flickr | 500px “Children and animals – it’s my life.

Amy Shackleton

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