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John William Waterhouse: Comprehensive Painting Gallery

The Galleries Guide - Want to know where to find Waterhouse paintings to see in person? View the list of galleries, each complete with detail information, map, directions, opening hours, and even current weather condition and 5-day forecast! Modern Day Models - Checkout the Waterhouse women of today. See photos of visitors who could have been a Waterhouse model. Very cool! Kind Words

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Sea monster Sea monsters are sea-dwelling mythical or legendary creatures, often believed to be of immense size. Marine monsters can take many forms, including sea dragons, sea serpents, or multi-armed beasts. They can be slimy or scaly and are often pictured threatening ships or spouting jets of water. Artists Turn Their Palettes into Paintings for the Exhibition “Point of Origin” Denis Sarazhin After completing a series of miniature paintings two years ago, Dina Brodsky (previously) turned to her palette, experimenting with the tool of the series’ creation until it became a work of its own. During a studio visit with a friend she noticed he too had created a work on an old palette, however the work was far different than her own. This discovery led Brodsky to investigate other artists’ palettes and how they might manipulate them into works, inviting both friends and strangers to experiment with their palettes. “Everyone I asked made a phenomenal painting, and because they were sharing the images on social media, a few other artists asked if they could participate,” said Brodsky to Colossal.

Artodyssey Robert Liberace Robert Liberace is equally accomplished in drawing, painting, and sculpture. His work is inspired by the centuries of knowledge, skill, and elegance of the old masters. He works in a variety of mediums including pencil, chalk, pen and ink, watercolor, and oil. Waterhouse's Versions of Ophelia Many artists painted Shakespeare's Ophelia, the tragic heroine of Hamlet, who became insane after Hamlet killed her father and deserted her. According to Peter Trippi, many Victorian artists used her as a symbol of “female fragility and missed opportunities,” Many artists depicted scenes of Ophelia’s watery death (Trippi 95). The artist J.W. Frederick Ferdinand Schafer Catalog, Home Page by Jerome H. Saltzer, Professor of Computer Science Emeritus Massachusetts Institute of Technology Frederick Ferdinand Schafer, Mount Hood from the Dalles, Oregon 44 x 72 inches Photo credit: Braarud Fine Art/LaConner, Washington Overview. This is an initial inventory of the paintings of Frederick Ferdinand Schafer, a nineteenth-century landscape artist of what is sometimes called the San Francisco or Rocky Mountain school. Schafer was born in Germany but most of his known works were painted in America, in California and other far western states, between 1876 and 1911.

jewish folklore Middle Ages[edit] There is considerable evidence of Jewish people helping the spread of Eastern folktales in Europe.[2] Besides these tales from foreign sources, Jews either collected or composed others which were told throughout the European ghettos, and were collected in Yiddish in the "Maasebücher".[2] Numbers of the folktales contained in these collections were also published separately.[3] It is, however, difficult to call many of them folktales in the sense given above, since nothing fairy-like or supernormal occurs in them.[2] Legends[edit] There are a few definitely Jewish legends of the Middle Ages which partake of the character of folktales, such as those of the Jewish pope Andreas and of the golem, or that relating to the wall of the Rashi chapel, which moved backward in order to save the life of a poor woman who was in danger of being crushed by a passing carriage in the narrow way. Aggadah and folklore compilations[edit]

Body Painting by Craig Tracy Article by James Pond I am the owner of Pondly.com / art lover / electrical engineer / software developer / MBA in e-business student. I blog for pleasure and love to share my Internet findings. johnwilliamwaterhouse.com Ophelia Date: 1889Medium: Oil on canvasSize: 38.5 x 62 in Waterhouse depicts Ophelia lying in a riverside meadow in an attitude of deranged abandon, one hand in her tousled hair, the other grasping flowers. The entry in Academy Notes for 1889 reads: "Ophelia lying in the grass, with the wild flowers she has gathered in the folds of her dress.

Winslow Homer: The Obtuse Bard Winslow Homer: The Obtuse Bard Homer viewed the world influenced by the ideas of those who surrounded him as a child in Cambridge, Massachusetts, especially the ideas of painter/poet Washington Allston, Allston's brother-in-law Richard Henry Dana Sr., and Allston's friend Benjamin Welles. In the writings of Allston's friends, especially Dana Sr. and Welles, there are discussions encouraging people to literally see "forms of departed friends in the white clouds" as common everyday experiences. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (to whom Allston read his "Lectures on Art"), William Cullen Bryant (a friend of Dana Sr.), and James Russell Lowell (who replaced Longfellow at Harvard) also made references to seeing such illusions in their poetry. For most people today, experience with such images is usually more abstracted, limited to images such as "The Man in the Moon" or the constellations. An artist who paints the moon might "improve," or idealize, the image of the "man in the moon."

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