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What Is Qi (Chi)?

What Is Qi (Chi)? Central to Taoist world-view and practice is qi (chi). Qi is life-force -- that which animates the forms of the world. It is the vibratory nature of phenomena -- the flow and tremoring that is happening continuously at molecular, atomic and sub-atomic levels. In Japan it is called “ki,” and in India, “prana” or “shakti.” The ancient Egyptians referred to it as “ka,” and the ancient Greeks as “pneuma.” In China, the understanding of qi is inherent in the very language. Many Different Kinds of Qi Practitioners of Chinese Medicine and qigong have identified many different kinds of qi. Balanced & Free-Flowing Qi = Health The fundamental insight of qigong and Chinese Medicine (acupuncture and herbal medicine) is that balanced and free-flowing qi results in health; while stagnant or imbalanced qi leads to disease. Feeling the Qi We might be in the habit of perceiving our world in terms of solid shapes and forms. Recommended reading: Orr, Katherine. Of Related Interest:

http://taoism.about.com/od/qi/a/Qi.htm

Related:  meditation

Mindfulness meditation training changes brain structure in eight weeks Participating in an 8-week mindfulness meditation program appears to make measurable changes in brain regions associated with memory, sense of self, empathy and stress. In a study that will appear in the January 30 issue of Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging, a team led by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) researchers report the results of their study, the first to document meditation-produced changes over time in the brain's grey matter. "Although the practice of meditation is associated with a sense of peacefulness and physical relaxation, practitioners have long claimed that meditation also provides cognitive and psychological benefits that persist throughout the day," says Sara Lazar, PhD, of the MGH Psychiatric Neuroimaging Research Program, the study's senior author. "This study demonstrates that changes in brain structure may underlie some of these reported improvements and that people are not just feeling better because they are spending time relaxing."

Qi Etymology[edit] The etymological explanation for the form of the qi logogram (or chi) in the traditional form 氣 is "steam (气) rising from rice (米) as it cooks". The earliest way of writing qi consisted of three wavy lines, used to represent one's breath seen on a cold day. The Twelve Primary Qi Channels - Part 1 Here will briefly review the twelve primary Qi channels along with the eight extraordinary meridians. You should also know the organ's Yin and Yang. In our body, there are six Yang organs and six Yin organs. Each Yang organ is associated with and harmonized by a Yin organ. Paired Yin and Yang organs belong to the same phase in the Five Phases. Their channels are sequential to each other in the circulation of Qi, their functions are closely related, and disease in one usually affects the other.

Chi and the Martial Arts by Rich Robson Almost everybody has heard that martial arts practice is good for improving one's health. Indeed, in most ads promoting a martial arts studio, health is given as the reason right after self-defense for studying the martial arts. Most of us believe this claim without thought. 10 Steps to Enhance Your Natural Telepathic Abilities Galactic Transmission HJ: We all have telepathic abilities, but like any skill, it takes a bit of practice to get good at it and when you don’t use it, it tends to fade. For most of us, our telepathic abilities come in flashes here and there, randomly and without warning. While this is proof that they exist, results are haphazard at best. Despite what many people believe, however, there is an actual art and science to mastering telepathic abilities.

The Ying Qi Cycle By William Morris, DAOM, PhD, LAc Editor's note: This article is from an upcoming book, Neoclassical Pulse Diagnosis. It is the result of clinical application of classical passages. "When one is joyous, then the qi is in harmony and the mind is unimpeded. “A Glimpse of the True Nature and High Potential of Chi power” “I am trying to keep an open mind. Can someone show a video clip of a Taichi Master throwing animals like a big dog or a bear? That will certainly convince me”.- therainbowsurf, top rated You Tube commentator

Shotokan Karate What is Shotokan Karate? Shotokan Karate is one of the most popular Martial Arts practised today. It has its root in the ancient Chinese Martial Arts and, in common with many Martial Arts, can be traced back to the early activities of monks at the Shoalin Temple. Although its early roots are Chinese, Shotokan was originally developed in Okinawa (a small island between China and Japan) and from there spread to Japan (where it was named) and has since spread to the world at large. Shotokan differs in style from other martial arts like Aikido and Tai Chi Chuan that emphasise soft, circular movements.

Understanding the Merkabah and Inter-Dimensional Travel June 24, 2014 Free Spirit, Guest Waking Times The Merkabah Vehicle is the means for travelling to higher dimensional planes and for ascending the physical body out of the 3rd dimension. Our Merkabah Vehicle is in essence our own inter-dimensional star-craft – similar to the structure in the Contact movie, albeit far more complex. The degree to which we have assembled our Merkabah Vehicle, will determine how far we can progress through the Astral Planes and whether we are able to use the interstellar and intergalactic wormholes. As we awaken to our higher dimensional selves and engage in conscious astral travel, we begin to ‘build’ our Merkabah.

Qigong Qigong, qi gong, chi kung, or chi gung (simplified Chinese: 气功; traditional Chinese: 氣功; pinyin: qìgōng; Wade–Giles: chi gong; literally: "Life Energy Cultivation") is type of spiritual practice intended to "align" body, breath, and mind for health, meditation, and martial arts training. With roots in Chinese medicine, philosophy, and martial arts, qigong is traditionally viewed as a practice to cultivate and balance qi (chi) or what has been translated as "life energy".[1] According to Daoist, Buddhist, and Confucian philosophy, respectively, qigong allows access to higher realms of awareness, awakens one's "true nature", and helps develop human potential.[2]

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