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What Is Qi (Chi)?

What Is Qi (Chi)? Central to Taoist world-view and practice is qi (chi). Qi is life-force -- that which animates the forms of the world. It is the vibratory nature of phenomena -- the flow and tremoring that is happening continuously at molecular, atomic and sub-atomic levels. In China, the understanding of qi is inherent in the very language. Many Different Kinds of Qi Practitioners of Chinese Medicine and qigong have identified many different kinds of qi. Balanced & Free-Flowing Qi = Health The fundamental insight of qigong and Chinese Medicine (acupuncture and herbal medicine) is that balanced and free-flowing qi results in health; while stagnant or imbalanced qi leads to disease. Feeling the Qi The capacity to perceive the flow of qi directly -- to actually see or feel it -- is something that can be cultivated through training in qigong or acupuncture. We might be in the habit of perceiving our world in terms of solid shapes and forms. Recommended reading: Orr, Katherine. Related:  meditation

Qi Etymology[edit] The etymological explanation for the form of the qi logogram (or chi) in the traditional form 氣 is "steam (气) rising from rice (米) as it cooks". The earliest way of writing qi consisted of three wavy lines, used to represent one's breath seen on a cold day. Definition[edit] References to concepts analogous to the qi taken to be the life-process or flow of energy that sustains living beings are found in many belief systems, especially in Asia. Within the framework of Chinese thought, no notion may attain such a degree of abstraction from empirical data as to correspond perfectly to one of our modern universal concepts. The ancient Chinese described it as "life force". Although the concept of qi has been important within many Chinese philosophies, over the centuries the descriptions of qi have varied and have sometimes been in conflict. Pronunciation[edit] Philosophical roots[edit] The earliest texts that speak of qi give some indications of how the concept developed.

Welcome to the National Qigong Association (Chi Kung) Mindfulness meditation training changes brain structure in eight weeks Participating in an 8-week mindfulness meditation program appears to make measurable changes in brain regions associated with memory, sense of self, empathy and stress. In a study that will appear in the January 30 issue of Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging, a team led by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) researchers report the results of their study, the first to document meditation-produced changes over time in the brain's grey matter. "Although the practice of meditation is associated with a sense of peacefulness and physical relaxation, practitioners have long claimed that meditation also provides cognitive and psychological benefits that persist throughout the day," says Sara Lazar, PhD, of the MGH Psychiatric Neuroimaging Research Program, the study's senior author. "This study demonstrates that changes in brain structure may underlie some of these reported improvements and that people are not just feeling better because they are spending time relaxing."

Chi and the Martial Arts by Rich Robson Almost everybody has heard that martial arts practice is good for improving one's health. Indeed, in most ads promoting a martial arts studio, health is given as the reason right after self-defense for studying the martial arts. Most of us believe this claim without thought. While all of that is true, there is an area of health benefits, more powerful than those mentioned above, that is virtually unknown by the non-martial artist and, unfortunately, too often little understood by martial art instructors themselves! While the study of chi has been part of Oriental culture for thousands of years, it was unknown in the West until only a few years ago when Nixon opened the doors to China in the 1970s. It is axiomatic that the human body requires energy, or chi, to run efficiently. When it comes to human chi, there are two basic types of chi: pre-birth chi and post-birth chi. However, the chi produced by the metabolic process is not that which actually makes a person "alive."

The Ying Qi Cycle By William Morris, DAOM, PhD, LAc Editor's note: This article is from an upcoming book, Neoclassical Pulse Diagnosis. It is the result of clinical application of classical passages. "When one is joyous, then the qi is in harmony and the mind is unimpeded. The nutritive qi and the protective qi pass freely," states Qi Bo in The Yellow Emperor's Classic. This article examines a method of diagnosing and treating the flow of the nutritive qi that is commonly used in Europe and America. Ying Qi Ying qi is translated as "construction qi" by Wiseman2 and "camp qi" by Unschuld.1 The definitions of nutrient qi and protective qi find root in military metaphors and could be likened to the U.S. The circulation of ying qi takes place throughout the day, remaining approximately two hours in each vessel. The two fire radicals in the upper portion of the character ying suggest not only a campfire, but also the fire of the sun, with the line below suggesting a rooftop. Figure 1: The Nan Jing pulse system.

The Twelve Primary Qi Channels - Part 1 Here will briefly review the twelve primary Qi channels along with the eight extraordinary meridians. You should also know the organ's Yin and Yang. In our body, there are six Yang organs and six Yin organs. Each Yang organ is associated with and harmonized by a Yin organ. Paired Yin and Yang organs belong to the same phase in the Five Phases. Their channels are sequential to each other in the circulation of Qi, their functions are closely related, and disease in one usually affects the other. In the limbs, the Yang channels are on the external side of the limbs while the Yin channels are on the internal side. The organs are further subdivided in order to distinguish the different levels of the Yin/Yang characteristics. Lung Channel of Hand Greater Yin The lungs (Yin) and the large intestine (Yang) are considered paired organs. In Qigong practice, since the lungs belong to Metal, they are able to regulate heartburn. Large Intestine Channel of Hand - Yang Brightness End of Part 1

the elements Chi sensation Qigong Qigong, qi gong, chi kung, or chi gung (simplified Chinese: 气功; traditional Chinese: 氣功; pinyin: qìgōng; Wade–Giles: chi gong; literally: "Life Energy Cultivation") is type of spiritual practice intended to "align" body, breath, and mind for health, meditation, and martial arts training. With roots in Chinese medicine, philosophy, and martial arts, qigong is traditionally viewed as a practice to cultivate and balance qi (chi) or what has been translated as "life energy".[1] According to Daoist, Buddhist, and Confucian philosophy, respectively, qigong allows access to higher realms of awareness, awakens one's "true nature", and helps develop human potential.[2] Qigong practice typically involves moving meditation, coordinating slow flowing movement, deep rhythmic breathing, and calm meditative state of mind. Over the centuries, a diverse spectrum of qigong forms developed in different segments of Chinese society. Etymology[edit] Main articles: Qi and Gongfu History and origins[edit]

“A Glimpse of the True Nature and High Potential of Chi power” “I am trying to keep an open mind. Can someone show a video clip of a Taichi Master throwing animals like a big dog or a bear? That will certainly convince me”.- therainbowsurf, top rated You Tube commentator From the YouTube video’s description: Ven Lama Dondrup Dorje, a renowned master, teacher of international champions who collected 370 gold medals from 1992 to 1998; here demonstates at the Fifth International Chinese Internal Arts Festival, England in 1996. From The Pathgate website: Qi is the Intrinsic Energy which sustains the configuration and integrity of all forms and substances in the Universe. I’ve always been amazed at the unbelievable claims made regarding “chi” energy. At the end of this video there are some suggestions from the world famous martial arts master George Dillman regarding advanced combat techniques which may help you defend yourself against a “chi” attack, should an assailant decide to use their incredible powers upon you! In summary these include: Footnotes:

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