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Spiritualism

Spiritualism
By 1853, when the popular song Spirit Rappings was published, Spiritualism was an object of intense curiosity. Spiritualism developed and reached its peak growth in membership from the 1840s to the 1920s, especially in English-speaking countries.[1][2] By 1897, it was said to have more than eight million followers in the United States and Europe,[3] mostly drawn from the middle and upper classes. The religion flourished for a half century without canonical texts or formal organization, attaining cohesion through periodicals, tours by trance lecturers, camp meetings, and the missionary activities of accomplished mediums. Beliefs[edit] Although various Spiritualist traditions have their own beliefs, known as Principles, there are some shared concepts:[citation needed] Mediumship and spirits[edit] Spiritualists believe in communicating with the spirits of discarnate humans. Compared with other religions[edit] Christian Protestantism Judaism Islam Spiritism Occult Origins[edit]

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Spirituality The term "spirituality" lacks a definitive definition, although social scientists have defined spirituality as the search for "the sacred," where "the sacred" is broadly defined as that which is set apart from the ordinary and worthy of veneration. Definition[edit] There is no single, widely-agreed definition of spirituality.[note 1] Social scientists have defined spirituality as the search for the sacred, for that which is set apart from the ordinary and worthy of veneration, "a transcendent dimension within human experience...discovered in moments in which the individual questions the meaning of personal existence and attempts to place the self within a broader ontological context." According to Waaijman, the traditional meaning of spirituality is a process of re-formation which "aims to recover the original shape of man, the image of God. Waaijman points out that "spirituality" is only one term of a range of words which denote the praxis of spirituality.

The World's Sixteen Crucified Saviors The World's Sixteen Crucified Saviors (1875) The World's Sixteen Crucified Saviors (or Christianity Before Christ) is an 1875 book written by Kersey Graves. It asserts that Jesus was not an actual person, but was a creation largely based on earlier stories of deities or god-men saviours who had been crucified, and descended to and ascended from the underworld. Parts were the reprinted in The Book Your Church Doesn't Want You to Read edited by Tim C. Leedom in 1994, and was republished in its entirety in 2001. Atheist activist Madelyn Murray O'Hair was a fan of the book.

THE FOX SISTERSThe Rise & Fall of Spiritualism's Founders In 1888, Maggie made the infamous appearance when she denounced Spiritualism as a total sham. The years of alcohol abuse, loneliness and grief had taken their toll on her and she weighed the idea of committing suicide before finally choosing confession instead. She booked the stage at the New York Academy of Music and walked out on stage to announce she and Kate had created the strange rappings heard in their Hydesville home by simply cracking their toes. She also stated that Leah had forced them into performing as mediums for the public. "I have seen so much miserable deception," she reportedly said. "That is why I am willing to state that Spiritualism is a fraud of the worst description."

Mysticism Index Contents Start Reading Page Index Text [Zipped] Evelyn Underhill (b. 6 Dec. 1875, d. 15 Jun 1941) was an English Anglo-Catholic writer who wrote extensively on Christian mysticism. A pacifist, novelist, and philosopher, she was widely read during the first half of the 20th century. List of occult terms List of occult terms From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. Mysticism Votive plaque depicting elements of the Eleusinian Mysteries, discovered in the sanctuary at Eleusis (mid-4th century BC) Mysticism ( pronunciation ) is "a constellation of distinctive practices, discourses, texts, institutions, traditions, and experiences aimed at human transformation, variously defined in different traditions."[web 1] The term "mysticism" has Western origins, with various, historically determined meanings.

Chakra From an 1899 Yoga manuscript in the Braj Bhasa language. Their name derives from the Sanskrit word for "wheel" or "turning", but in the yogic context a better translation of the word is 'vortex or whirlpool'.[1][note 1] The concept of chakra features in tantric and yogic traditions of Hinduism and Buddhism. Etymology[edit] Sanskrit chakra derives from the Proto-Indo-European *kʷekʷlos; its cognates include Greek kuklos, Lithuanian kaklas, Tocharian B kokale, and English "wheel," as well as "circle" and "cycle".[2] M.

Esotericism Esotericism (or esoterism) signifies the holding of esoteric opinions or beliefs,[1] that is, ideas preserved or understood by a small group of those specially initiated, or of rare or unusual interest.[2] The term derives from the Greek, either from the comparative ἐσώτερος (esôteros), "inner", or from its derived adjective ἐσωτερικός (esôterikos), "pertaining to the innermost".[3] The term can also refer to the academic study of esoteric religious movements and philosophies, or to the study of those religious movements and philosophies whose proponents distinguish their beliefs, practices, and experiences from mainstream exoteric and more dogmatic institutionalized traditions.[4] Although esotericism refers to an exploration of the hidden meanings and symbolism in various philosophical, historical, and religious texts, the texts themselves are often central to mainstream religions. For example, the Bible and the Torah are considered esoteric material.[7] Etymology[edit]

LGBT topics and Wicca In support of this philosophy, many Wiccans cite the Charge of the Goddess, which says "All acts of Love and Pleasure are My rituals".[3] Therefore all forms and expressions of sexuality, as long as they are otherwise healthy and consensual, are accepted. LGBT issues in Gardnerian practice[edit] Anti-homosexuality[edit]

Atheist, Gnostic, Theist, Agnostic Too many times I have informed someone that I am an atheist, only to have them reply, “Oh, but how could you know that God doesn’t exist? You’re taking a faith position!” Many headaches later, we finally come to an agreement over the definitions of these words. This arrangement is an attempt to clarify and classify these words, so that their rogue meanings no longer confuse and muddle religious debate. To begin with, here are the four key terms arranged on a graph with their opposites across from them. This should allow a very rough placement of one’s theological position.

That is interesting. The Tibetan book of the dead in a way works similar to help prevent ghost. As does the egyptian book of the dead. There are quite a many rituals to help the living and the dead. To prevent haunting like experiences or bad luck or bad feelings. by bobbyb Oct 25

This webpage relates to the topic of animism. It speaks of spiritualism, which is the belief that the spirits of the dead can intervene in the mortal world. The Aboriginals thought that when they killed a certain animal, they had to do a series of rituals to prevent this animal's spirit from giving them bad luck, as in a bad hunt. by zacharytremblay Oct 25

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