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Aerogel

Aerogel
A block of aerogel in a person's hand Aerogel was first created by Samuel Stephens Kistler in 1931, as a result of a bet with Charles Learned over who could replace the liquid in "jellies" with gas without causing shrinkage.[3][4] IUPAC definition Gel comprised of a microporous solid in which the dispersed phase is a gas. Note 1: Microporous silica, microporous glass, and zeolites are common examples of aerogels. Note 2: Corrected from ref. [4], where the definition is a repetition of the incorrect definition of a gel followed by an inexplicit reference to the porosity of the structure. [6] Properties[edit] A flower is on a piece of aerogel which is suspended over a flame from a Bunsen burner. Aerogels are good thermal insulators because they almost nullify two of the three methods of heat transfer (convection, conduction, and radiation). Owing to its hygroscopic nature, aerogel feels dry and acts as a strong desiccant. Knudsen effect[edit] Materials[edit] Silica[edit] Carbon[edit] Alumina[edit]

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Next Time Your Mom Says Don't Go Out in The Rain, Spray Yourself With This : Krulwich Wonders... OK, this is an ad. I can't vouch for it. I'm almost embarrassed to be showing it to you. But you have to take a look. Defence mechanism A defence mechanism is a coping technique that reduces anxiety arising from unacceptable or potentially harmful impulses.[1] Defence mechanisms are unconscious and are not to be confused with conscious coping strategies.[2] Sigmund Freud was one of the first proponents of this construct.[3] Healthy persons normally use different defences throughout life. An ego defence mechanism becomes pathological only when its persistent use leads to maladaptive behaviour such that the physical or mental health of the individual is adversely affected. The purpose of ego defence mechanisms is to protect the mind/self/ego from anxiety and/or social sanctions and/or to provide a refuge from a situation with which one cannot currently cope.[9] One resource used to evaluate these mechanisms is the Defense Style Questionnaire (DSQ-40).[10][11] Structural model: Id, ego, and superego[edit]

How Science Turned a Struggling Pro Skier Into an Olympic Medal Contender - Wired Science Saslong.org/R.Perathoner Steven Nyman is poised at the starting gate, alert, coiled, ready. A signal sounds: three even tones followed by a single, more urgent pitch, sending Nyman kicking onto the Val Gardena downhill ski course. He pushes five times with his poles, accelerating as quickly as possible, stabbing the snow frantically. He skates forward with abbreviated strokes, neon green boots moving up and down, his focus on building as much momentum as possible. Nyman is feeling good.

List of common misconceptions From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia This incomplete list is not intended to be exhaustive. This list corrects erroneous beliefs that are currently widely held about notable topics. Each misconception and the corresponding facts have been discussed in published literature. Note that each entry is formatted as a correction; the misconceptions themselves are implied rather than stated.

Company develops new fiber-reinforced wood, concrete ink for 3D printing Even though 3D printing is an emerging market and technology, aside from Defense Distributed’s gun, it seems like it has hit a plateau. You can make little or somewhat-bigger-than-little figurines, teacups and mugs that often have leaks, or fragile parts — such as gears — that you can include in a working item, but might quickly wear down. One of the things holding 3D printing back is the material used to print objects. A San Francisco-based company, Emerging Objects, has created new printing materials that aren’t just plastic, but composed of wood, concrete, and even salt. Do we really give introverts a hard time? 27 March 2012Last updated at 12:50 ET By Vanessa Barford BBC News Magazine In a group situation, it's not necessarily the talkers who have the best ideas It is often assumed extroverts do best in life, but according to a new best-selling book, introverts are just as high achievers.

The bacteria that turns water into ice Meet Pseudomonas syringae, a bacterium that causes disease in plants and helps make snow machines work. It all has to do with ice nucleation — the process that forms ice crystals in the atmosphere and, thus, snow. You probably know that raindrops and snowflakes form around something. There's always a central nucleus that serves as the backbone of the water molecule structure. Usually, when people talk about this process, they use soot or some other kind of particulate matter as the example of what a nucleus can be. But bacteria can also become the nucleus of a snowflake.

Howie Green Gallery: Fritz Trautmann - Personal Rhythms Personal Rhythmsby Fritz Trautmann When man feels his own personal rhythms vibrating in tune with the forces playing upon him, he calls the experience "Beauty." It may happen on the plane of the senses, on the level of the intellect, in the depths of his affections, or at the exalted heights of spiritual insight, but wherever met and however designated, it is - of its kind - a response to this sense of beauty. As sensory experience - described as savory or delicious, handsome or pretty, harmonious or melodic, soothing, exhilarating, aromatic or fragrant - it is Pleasure. To the intellect - when it is consistent, functional or logical it is Truth. To the heart - when sympathetic, compassionate or loyal it is Love.

Octave illusion Octave illusion. Experiment[edit] The two tones used were pitched at 400 Hz and 800 Hz, corresponding roughly to G4 and G5 in modern pitch notation. 3D Printing Droplet Networks Peter Rothman Oxford University scientists have demonstrated a custom-built programmable 3D printer which can create materials with several of the properties of living tissues. The new type of material consists of thousands of connected water droplets, encapsulated within lipid films, which can perform some of the functions of the cells inside our bodies. Abhisheka Abhisheka as a ritual[edit] Abhisheka, also called Abhishekam, is conducted by priests, by pouring libations on the image of the deity being worshipped, amidst the chanting of mantras. Usually, offerings such as milk, yogurt, ghee, honey, Panchaamrutam, sesame oil, rosewater, sandalwood paste may be poured among other offerings depending on the type of abhishekam being performed. This ritual is routinely performed in some Hindu and Jain temples. "Rudraabhisheka" (रुद्राभिषेक) (Abhisheka of Rudra) is performed on Shiva lingams.

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